[OT] Rails development on desktop Linux?

I’m currently a Windows user, but I’m considering getting away from it.
I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are. A
discussion of your general experience would be great, too.

(Let’s say for the moment that Mac OSX is out of the picture, since I
already have very good non-proprietary hardware.)

hi, i tried to use ubuntu over the summer, but being a noob, i always
ran into problems with my hardware. linux couldnt use my wireless card
on my laptop, on my pc, i had trouble congifuring my sound card. i also
had problems with configuring everything to run smoothly(web apps,
software, mysql…). i felt that everytime i sudo installed something, i
was crossing my fingers in hope no error messages popped up. i finally
got around and got RoR up and running but then would run into minor
error prompts with mysql, webbrick, rails commands etc…i searched all
over the net and found that macOs seemed to have the most information
and support. i decided to ditch the linux and buy a mac. since then, i
been spending all my time developing and learning RoR as suppose to
always having that feeling of ‘i hope this installs clean…’ also, i am
now a mac fan and broke. buying a mac also forced me to upgrade my
monitors. =)

Hi

I’d like to defend ubuntu on the useability point. If you have not used
linux before, (as I hadn’t before the spring) it seems like a good one
to start with. Particularly on the hardware front where things (like USB
internet modems and - for me - soundcards) just work. Most of the
problems I have had getting things to work, like wireless and flash, I
put down to being on an AMD64 laptop which
has risible driver support at the mo.

i felt that everytime i sudo installed something, i
was crossing my fingers in hope no error messages popped up.

I don’t think you can get away from this if you are learning linux :slight_smile:

On the other hand, people do seem to have problems with getting RoR up
and running on it, perhaps due to poor package support. (google ubuntu
and rails and you should find tons of stuff)

For myself the experience has been invaluable, largely because if I had
gone with a Mac as I considered I would have then been completely
stuffed when I wanted to get my VPS up and running. But that’s only
because I was a linux newbie and needed to learn these things.

Apart from installation crap, developing on linux has for me been very
similar to developing on windows. It’s just RadRails + command line :slight_smile:

best
Dan

ps. When you make the switch, you’ll get some odd errors from your
previously working apps that I can’t remember off the top of my head.
Some of them will be due to windows/unix carriage return
incompatibility. Just a quick tip!

Like Daniel, I started RoR on Ubuntu in spring. Before that, I was
pretty much all Windows, C++/C#/ASP.NET. I’m using the Dapper Drake
release and I don’t have any problems so far. If I remember correctly,
I think I chose the “Server Install” option. It did take some getting
used to(may be a couple weeks to figure things out) but it has been
pretty much smooth sailing every since. I thought not having an IDE
with a good debugger would be troublesome but I’m actually surprised
that the command line breakpointer + development.log have been enough to
solve my problems.

Daniel L. wrote:

Hi

I’d like to defend ubuntu on the useability point. If you have not used
linux before, (as I hadn’t before the spring) it seems like a good one
to start with. Particularly on the hardware front where things (like USB
internet modems and - for me - soundcards) just work. Most of the
problems I have had getting things to work, like wireless and flash, I
put down to being on an AMD64 laptop which
has risible driver support at the mo.

i felt that everytime i sudo installed something, i
was crossing my fingers in hope no error messages popped up.

I don’t think you can get away from this if you are learning linux :slight_smile:

On the other hand, people do seem to have problems with getting RoR up
and running on it, perhaps due to poor package support. (google ubuntu
and rails and you should find tons of stuff)

For myself the experience has been invaluable, largely because if I had
gone with a Mac as I considered I would have then been completely
stuffed when I wanted to get my VPS up and running. But that’s only
because I was a linux newbie and needed to learn these things.

Apart from installation crap, developing on linux has for me been very
similar to developing on windows. It’s just RadRails + command line :slight_smile:

best
Dan

ps. When you make the switch, you’ll get some odd errors from your
previously working apps that I can’t remember off the top of my head.
Some of them will be due to windows/unix carriage return
incompatibility. Just a quick tip!

Bryan D. wrote:

I’m currently a Windows user, but I’m considering getting away from it.
I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are. A
discussion of your general experience would be great, too.

(Let’s say for the moment that Mac OSX is out of the picture, since I
already have very good non-proprietary hardware.)

I also like Ubuntu, I was a long time Suze/KDE user but recently
switched to Ubuntu/Gnome with little or no difficulties

Bryan D. wrote:

I’m currently a Windows user, but I’m considering getting away from it.
I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are. A
discussion of your general experience would be great, too.

(Let’s say for the moment that Mac OSX is out of the picture, since I
already have very good non-proprietary hardware.)

I currently do my Ruby/Rails development on an HP Intel box running
Gentoo Linux, and haven’t had a single problem.

If you’re new to Linux, I would also recommend OpenSuse, as it is much
simpler than Gentoo to configure and maintain, and I’ve had good
experiences doing Ruby development using it as well.

I use eclipse for my Ruby development, and a couple of great plug-ins:
RDT & RadRails. I’ve actually found these tools to be more stable on my
Gentoo box than on Windows (especially the debugger). If you’re familiar
with eclipse development, you’ll find the experience with RDT and
RadRails pretty familiar. The Ruby tools for eclipse are more or less
comparable with the Java tools, with the exception of the debugger and
the search functionality, which still need a bit of work. All in all,
I’ve found the experience developing in Ruby/Rails on Linux to be
positive.

Hope this helps.
cheers.

  • Bryan

I’m on FC5 and using Eclipse for RoR development. Works Great. Less
Filling.

Bryan D. wrote:

I’m currently a Windows user, but I’m considering getting away from it.
I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are. A
discussion of your general experience would be great, too.

I’m using Fedora on a ThinkPad. I use GEdit as my editor
(http://www.gnome.org/projects/gedit/) when I’m not using vi.

script/console is a great thing, and sometimes I dust off the
breakpointer or irb.

I’ve switched to FedoreCore 5 and RadRails, mongrel for by primary
development environment. I find it fast and reliable. If I could get
my wireless cards to work with it, I’d replace the Windows on my
laptop. ( still keep a windows box for pre-deployment testing if the
production environment will be a Windows platform).

Note: Just discovered that FederaCore6 is out, but haven’t checked it
out, yet.

-Larry

On 11/2/06, Bryan D. [email protected] wrote:

Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.


Best Regards,
-Larry
“Work, work, work…there is no satisfactory alternative.”
— E.Taft Benson

On 11/2/06, Bryan D. [email protected] wrote:

I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are.

SuSE 10, jEdit, VMWare for testing with IE

Switch now, and don’t look back… :slight_smile:

Hassan S. ------------------------ [email protected]

Ubuntu 6.06, Vim text editor with many plugins, mongreal,
gnome-terminal

I am considering mr_guid right now…

Ubuntu Edgy : Vim, Scribes, Mongrel and rails.

Ubuntu does not ship with ruby gems, so you have to download and
install the gems package and then install rails via gem. Have been
using Ubuntu for the last year and a half and have been very happy
with it. As a long time linux user, I have worked on all the major
distros out there, but have been really happy with Ubuntu.

I’m running SuSE 10.1 (soon to be Kubuntu) + RadRails and emacs. No
problems, but I’ve also been using Linux as my primary non-work desktop
for about 6 years.

I will likely move to a Mac next year, but I’m pretty happy with Linux.

On Nov 2, 6:06 pm, Bryan D. [email protected]

Check out RailsLive CD, it has all the essential tools for Rails
development on Linux. You have two options:

  1. Boot RailsLiveCD from a CD.
  2. Install VM ware player and run the RailsLiveCD.

I got the option two working after some struggle and help from the
creator of that product. Here is link:
http://bparanj.blogspot.com/2006/10/linux-railslivecd-and-vmware-player-on.html

Cool thing is that you can save all your work on a flash drive and
work on any machine.

Switched from OpenSuse (after 10.1) to Kubuntu Dapper (Edgy as of this
week) for my main workstation. Server is OpenSuse 10.0. I have Windows
Media Center Laptop that I share with my wife, as well. Quick Irony:
Kubuntu just works with my HP Officejet and USB devices. The Windows
laptop crashed with the OfficeJet (its an HP laptop) and flat out
refused to recognize my serial ATA drive. I had to dig out and install
a floppy drive to load the driver. Anecdotal, but there you go.

I think I prefer Adept/Apt over Yast/RMP (and whatever Novell
introduced to in 10.1).

Prefer KDE over Gnome, but that’s a preference.

Been giving Komodo 3.5, RadRails 7.x and jEdit a workout for the past
few months. BTW, each are available for Linux/OSX/Windows.

jEdit and it’s plugins are outstanding. Configurable and flexible. GPL,
I believe. Keeps you honest, too.

Komodo is flexible as well. It’s Ruby support is good, but Rails adds a
little nuance. Not free in any sense.

RadRails is Rails-centric (go figure) and is a good compromise between
Komodo and JEdit.

I’ve been using Komodo the most, then jEdit. RadRails is good
(especially debugging), but it is a single task critter. I guess if you
use it as a plug-in to Eclipse that is not true.

Firefox and Konqueror, Konsole (bash), the MySQL GUI stuff (cross
platform), DIA, and RapidSVN (also cross platform).

On 11/2/06, Bryan D. [email protected] wrote:


Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

I too, do some Ruby/Rails development on Linux. I have a post on my
site
where I described my process of how I install Ruby and Rails on Ubuntu.
Perhaps someone here might find it useful…

http://www.linuxlooney.com/past/2006/8/15/installing_ruby_and_rails_on/

Cheers,

Aaron K.

On Fri, Nov 03, 2006 at 01:06:44AM +0100, Bryan D. wrote:

I’m currently a Windows user, but I’m considering getting away from it.
I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are. A
discussion of your general experience would be great, too.

I’m running Debian testing. I use KDE and konqueror for file browsing.
Navicat Linux for DB administration, and my editor of choice is vim. It
is not noob friendly, but I find I am much faster with a highly scripted
vim setup rather than an ide such a RadRails.

RadRails is very nice and very very powerful, but I like my vim
keybindings :slight_smile:

-John

On 11/3/06, Ilan B. [email protected] wrote:

I also like Ubuntu, I was a long time Suze/KDE user but recently
switched to Ubuntu/Gnome with little or no difficulties


Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

I’m using Suse 10.1 with radrails as development tool.
Everything works fine, we also use Suse on our bigger servers. Very
stable no problems.

Suse 10.1 can also running on a USB disk,

John O. wrote:

On Fri, Nov 03, 2006 at 01:06:44AM +0100, Bryan D. wrote:

I’m currently a Windows user, but I’m considering getting away from it.
I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are. A
discussion of your general experience would be great, too.

I’m running Debian testing. I use KDE and konqueror for file browsing.
Navicat Linux for DB administration, and my editor of choice is vim. It
is not noob friendly, but I find I am much faster with a highly scripted
vim setup rather than an ide such a RadRails.

RadRails is very nice and very very powerful, but I like my vim
keybindings :slight_smile:

-John

Ditto here (mostly) on the setup. Debian Etch, and/or Ubuntu. I won’t
touch Suse with a 10 foot pole after Novell’s deal with Microsoft.
Novell is no friend of free software.

Anyway: vim for editing, fuse/sshfs for remote filesystems,
psql/pgadmin3 for database work and browsercam for cross-OS/browser
testing when needed. Dual 17 inch LCDs and an HP AMD 64-bit system set
me back around $1100 - fast, stable and cheap.

With linux, the whole OS is your IDE. The big issue with Radrails for me
is that it’s just too slow (for example - switching tabs - OUCH!) and
the editor is horrid compared to vim/emacs.

-DJCP

I’m currently a Windows user, but I’m considering getting away from it.
I was wondering if there are developers out there who are doing Rails on
a desktop Linux distribution, and what your essential tools are. A
discussion of your general experience would be great, too.

I’m running Ubuntu Edgy, I use vim for editing, and the TagList + my
RailsTagList patch
(http://en.logilogi.org/HomE/WyboWiersma/RailsTagList)
vim-plugin for file browsing within projects, the console for between.

Also don’t miss the rails.vim plugin if you decide to go for Vim.

Wybo

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