Open Source Subversion Hosting

Looking for Rubyist’s recommendations for free open-source Subversion
hosting now that Rubyforge is being (albeit ever so slowly) phased
out.

I host most of my work on Github and I am very happy with it (even
though I find using git itself a bit like working in a 1970s CS
lab ;). But I have a number of scrap projects, code snippets,
explorations, and so on, that I want to keep in a repo, something more
suitable to Subversion b/c it handles sub-projects well.

I tried Google Projects and was quickly disappointed by the
limitations on source code browsing (it stops working if you have “too
many” files). The interface also feels a bit clunky (IMO). But the
repo was fast.

At the moment I am back to Sourceforge.org. Unfortunately it is VERY
SLOW. It also feels very outdated, hard to navigate, feature bloat,
etc.

Wondering if there are better options out there that others could
recommend.

Thomas S. wrote:

Looking for Rubyist’s recommendations for free open-source Subversion
hosting now that Rubyforge is being (albeit ever so slowly) phased
out.

I host most of my work on Github and I am very happy with it (even
though I find using git itself a bit like working in a 1970s CS
lab ;).

Then you’re not using Git properly, I think.

But I have a number of scrap projects, code snippets,
explorations, and so on, that I want to keep in a repo, something more
suitable to Subversion b/c it handles sub-projects well.

So does Git. In fact, Git does everything Subversion does, but better.
Do yourself a big favor and drop Subversion entirely.

This goes double for open-source projects: Git really was designed with
the needs of open-source projects in mind, while Subversion was not. It
shows.

I tried Google Projects and was quickly disappointed by the
limitations on source code browsing (it stops working if you have “too
many” files). The interface also feels a bit clunky (IMO). But the
repo was fast.

At the moment I am back to Sourceforge.org. Unfortunately it is VERY
SLOW. It also feels very outdated, hard to navigate, feature bloat,
etc.

What’s wrong with feature bloat? In my book, that’s often a good thing.

Wondering if there are better options out there that others could
recommend.

The best option: use Git and Github. Failing that, I don’t remember:
does Unfuddle provide free hosting for open source?

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 11:48 AM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected] wrote:

But I have a number of scrap projects, code snippets,
explorations, and so on, that I want to keep in a repo, something more
suitable to Subversion b/c it handles sub-projects well.

So does Git. In fact, Git does everything Subversion does, but better.
Do yourself a big favor and drop Subversion entirely.

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:
That said, most other things about git are far nicer than git, so this
wart is something tolerable.

I love git, but it’s strange how people can get all militant fan-boy
over it. Oh well, such is life.

-greg

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 11:58 AM, Gregory B.
[email protected] wrote:

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 11:48 AM, Marnen Laibow-Koser [email protected] wrote:

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:
That said, most other things about git are far nicer than git, so this

whoops, I meant: things about git are far nicer than svn :slight_smile:

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 12:05 PM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected] wrote:

Gregory B. wrote:

So does Git. �In fact, Git does everything Subversion does, but better.
Do yourself a big favor and drop Subversion entirely.

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:

Is git submodule really any worse than svn external?

When things get complicated, yes. Google around for some of the
problems.

I’m not meaning to be a militant fanboy. Â The couple of times I’ve gone
back to Subversion after starting to work with Git have convinced me
that I never want to work with Subversion again.

Likewise, but that’s mainly because I have a lot of needs that Git
meets. Otherwise, it might not be so important which one I choose.
I know a lot of really smart Rubyists that still have this hangup
where they don’t get git. I don’t know why that is, but personally,
I rather them use svn than hear them constantly complain about how
“unintuitive” git is.

I do agree on your point that there are a lot of incentives for using
Git in open source, though.

-greg

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 09:05, Marnen Laibow-Koser [email protected]
wrote:

Is git submodule really any worse than svn external?

I’d say that currently released versions of Git make working with
submodules pretty awkward. However, the upcoming 1.7 release of Git
gets rid of almost every last one of my complaints about working with
submodules. They’re a lot harder to get out of sync, without
realizing it.

-Jacob

Gregory B. wrote:

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 11:48 AM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected] wrote:

But I have a number of scrap projects, code snippets,
explorations, and so on, that I want to keep in a repo, something more
suitable to Subversion b/c it handles sub-projects well.

So does Git. �In fact, Git does everything Subversion does, but better.
Do yourself a big favor and drop Subversion entirely.

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:

Is git submodule really any worse than svn external?

That said, most other things about git are far nicer than git, so this
wart is something tolerable.

I love git, but it’s strange how people can get all militant fan-boy
over it. Oh well, such is life.

I’m not meaning to be a militant fanboy. The couple of times I’ve gone
back to Subversion after starting to work with Git have convinced me
that I never want to work with Subversion again.

-greg

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

On Jan 26, 12:05 pm, Marnen Laibow-Koser [email protected] wrote:

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:

Is git submodule really any worse than svn external?

To clarify, I wasn’t referring to submodules or externals. By
“subproject” I meant literally keeping multiple projects in a single
repo. Subversion’s advantage here is that a subdirectory can be
handled as an independent unit within the whole.

On Jan 26, 2010, at 11:29 AM, Intransition wrote:

Do yourself a big favor and drop Subversion entirely.

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:

Is git submodule really any worse than svn external?

To clarify, I wasn’t referring to submodules or externals. By
“subproject” I meant literally keeping multiple projects in a single
repo. Subversion’s advantage here is that a subdirectory can be
handled as an independent unit within the whole.

Yeah, it was nice how you could pretty much check out a folder of a huge
repository.

James Edward G. II

Gregory B. wrote:

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 12:05 PM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected] wrote:

Gregory B. wrote:

So does Git. �In fact, Git does everything Subversion does, but better.
Do yourself a big favor and drop Subversion entirely.

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:

Is git submodule really any worse than svn external?

When things get complicated, yes. Google around for some of the
problems.

I’m not meaning to be a militant fanboy. Â The couple of times I’ve gone
back to Subversion after starting to work with Git have convinced me
that I never want to work with Subversion again.

Likewise, but that’s mainly because I have a lot of needs that Git
meets. Otherwise, it might not be so important which one I choose.

It’s still important. The typical Subversion user never realizes the
full potential of branching because Subversion makes merging so hard.

I know a lot of really smart Rubyists that still have this hangup
where they don’t get git. I don’t know why that is, but personally,
I rather them use svn than hear them constantly complain about how
“unintuitive” git is.

I would say the opposite. I didn’t get Git for a long time. I only get
it now because I heard enough good things about it that I sort of forced
myself to use it.

I do agree on your point that there are a lot of incentives for using
Git in open source, though.

-greg

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

On Jan 26, 11:48 am, Marnen Laibow-Koser [email protected] wrote:

So does Git. In fact, Git does everything Subversion does, but better.
Do yourself a big favor and drop Subversion entirely.

This goes double for open-source projects: Git really was designed with
the needs of open-source projects in mind, while Subversion was not. It
shows.

I agree that on the whole git is better, but not in all ways.
Subversion has certain merits, including being a bit more intuitive
(IMO).

Believe me I would use git if I felt it fit my needs here. I was using
Darcs way back when. I enjoy the benefits of distributed VCS. But in
this case, where I have a bunch of little odds-and-ends that I want to
keep subdivided but within a single repo, svn fits better.

On Tue, Jan 26, 2010 at 4:48 PM, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected]wrote:

Wondering if there are better options out there that others could
recommend.

The best option: use Git and Github. Failing that, I don’t remember:
does Unfuddle provide free hosting for open source?

Unfuddle has a free hosting option for private projects - only one user
has
access to them.
I don’t know if there is a GitHub equivalent option.

On Jan 26, 2010, at 12:54 PM, Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

repo. Subversion’s advantage here is that a subdirectory can be
handled as an independent unit within the whole.

I used to structure my Subversion repositories this way. In retrospect,
it’s hard to see a particularly good reason for it – at least in my
case, I never did the sort of cross-project reuse that it would have
facilitated. I certainly don’t see it as a reason to avoid Git.

We used it a lot with the TextMate bundles. We could have users
checkout just the files related to their issues. It was nice for
support.

If we would have made them checkout the entire repository, it
dramatically raises the maintenance they are obligated to. They need to
keep up with newer versions.

James Edward G. II

Thomas S. wrote:

On Jan 26, 12:05�pm, Marnen Laibow-Koser [email protected] wrote:

Git handles subprojects, sure… but it’s arguable whether it does
them well :slight_smile:

Is git submodule really any worse than svn external?

To clarify, I wasn’t referring to submodules or externals. By
“subproject” I meant literally keeping multiple projects in a single
repo. Subversion’s advantage here is that a subdirectory can be
handled as an independent unit within the whole.

I used to structure my Subversion repositories this way. In retrospect,
it’s hard to see a particularly good reason for it – at least in my
case, I never did the sort of cross-project reuse that it would have
facilitated. I certainly don’t see it as a reason to avoid Git.

If you still want to do this, git-subtree looks like it might be the
right tool.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

On 1/26/2010 10:45 AM, Intransition wrote:

I agree that on the whole git is better, but not in all ways.
Subversion has certain merits, including being a bit more intuitive
(IMO).

I’ve heard many people say this, which I find interesting. I guess it’s
all what you started with,
because I’ve always found Subversion less intuitive than Git. Things
like to create branches
or tags in svn it’s ‘svn copy’ whereas git has ‘git branch’ and ‘git
tag’ have always been
stumbling blocks for me. It also drives me nuts that ‘svn rm’ and ‘svn
move’ can’t take
wild-cards.

All things considered though, I don’t think it’s worth a religious war,
or even a hard
sell for one or the other. Use what works for you.

As to the original question, SpringLoops(https://www.springloops.com/)
might
be worth a look. It’s not as feature rich as some others, but it has
the bonus
of letting you deploy via ftp/sftp.

Gregory B. wrote:

I love git, but it’s strange how people can get all militant fan-boy
over it. Oh well, such is life.

“I love #{@app}, but it’s strange how people can get all militant
fan-boy over it. Oh well, such is life.”

This seems especially prevalent in the Ruby/Rails communities, but
maybe I don’t spend enough time in other crowds.

But, seriously, git works best when used with vim hacking Ramaze
projects on Kubuntu running on a Dell laptop. Otherwise you’re just a
luser.

James

Walton H. wrote:

All things considered though, I don’t think it’s worth a religious war,
or even a hard
sell for one or the other. Use what works for you.

I’m usually up for a good religious war because, as it just so happens,
I’m always right.

But I’d really like to see more pointers to good resources on various
tools to help people make up their own minds.

I was at a gathering of Web developers the other night, and someone
admitted to liking ans using Dreamweaver. The reaction from most of the
other people there was hysterical. No, really, I think people got a bit
hysterical because someone was using the Great Satan HTML Editor.

I’ve been guilty of playing that game myself, but now would rather just
try to understand why people make different choices than me. I figure
might actually learn something. :slight_smile:

It’s interesting to hear from people using svn (or whatever) given the
git push (ha ha) among many Rubyists. Perhaps they have a style of
working that others can steal from.


James B.

www.jamesbritt.com - Playing with Better Toys
www.ruby-doc.org - Ruby Help & Documentation
www.rubystuff.com - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff
www.neurogami.com - Smart application development

On Wed, Jan 27, 2010 at 01:43:19AM +0900, Intransition wrote:

I tried Google Projects and was quickly disappointed by the
limitations on source code browsing (it stops working if you have “too
many” files). The interface also feels a bit clunky (IMO). But the
repo was fast.

At the moment I am back to Sourceforge.org. Unfortunately it is VERY
SLOW. It also feels very outdated, hard to navigate, feature bloat,
etc.

Wondering if there are better options out there that others could
recommend.

http://beanstalkapp.com has a free option and I’ve heard they are good.
No personal experience though. Looks like codesion (formerly cvsdude)
also has a free subversion hosting option.

enjoy,

-jeremy

On 26.01.2010 19:49, Richard C. wrote:

Unfuddle has a free hosting option for private projects - only one user has
access to them.
I don’t know if there is a GitHub equivalent option.

Free hosting for public projects, and one contributor. Mitigated by
gits ability to fork, and GitHub allowing pull requests for free
repositories.

Size of the repo is limited to 300MB in the free plan, too.

On Feb 4, 2:51 pm, Jeremy H. [email protected] wrote:

recommend.

http://beanstalkapp.comhas a free option and I’ve heard they are good.
No personal experience though. Looks like codesion (formerly cvsdude)
also has a free subversion hosting option.

Beanstalk does look like one of the better systems --even though their
free plan is a bit small compared to some others.

http://www.codespaces.com/ also looks pretty good too, btw.

Of all the options I checked out I can’t say any of them really popped
out as “the clear choice for hosting an open source project”. I’m
probably wrong but until more info comes my way, or I have the time to
digg in deeper, I’ve decided to just hold out at SoureForge.

If anyone has any first hand knowledge of these providers, looks like
it’s a subject ripe for blogging.

Thanks.

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