Open source rails 2 books

Hello,
where can I find open source rails 2 books?

Thank you in advance.

Cheers,

Fla As wrote:

Hello,
where can I find open source rails 2 books?

Thank you in advance.

Cheers,

Go and buy the pdf AWDWR
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/rails3/agile-web-development-with-rails-third-edition
Your software has cost you nothing, putting your hand in your pocket to
find £15 ish is a no brainer and the best purchase you’ll ever make.
Otherwise go and google Ryan B. Rails casts and see what others in
here recommend but AWDWR is my Rails bible along with the pickaxe book
on Ruby (But that is for later :-))

James W. wrote:
[…]

Go and buy the pdf AWDWR
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/rails3/agile-web-development-with-rails-third-edition

I suspect the OP knows about AWDWR – he was looking for open-source
books.

Your software has cost you nothing, putting your hand in your pocket to
find £15 ish is a no brainer and the best purchase you’ll ever make.

Why is it a no-brainer? It’s not like the money goes to support the
Rails core team.

Otherwise go and google Ryan B. Rails casts and see what others in
here recommend

Yesyesyes. Railscasts (and ASCIIcasts) freakin’ rock!

but AWDWR is my Rails bible

I understand that it’s very good. Just by way of comparison, though, I
am an experienced Rails developer who’s never read a single commercial
Rails book (aside from leafing through a couple in the bookstore).
Depending on your learning style, it may be feasible.

along with the pickaxe book
on Ruby (But that is for later :-))

No! The pickaxe book is not “for later”. To use Rails effectively,
it is essential to have a good basic understanding of how Ruby works.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

James W. wrote:
[…]

Go and buy the pdf AWDWR
http://www.pragprog.com/titles/rails3/agile-web-development-with-rails-third-edition

I suspect the OP knows about AWDWR – he was looking for open-source
books.

Your software has cost you nothing, putting your hand in your pocket to
find £15 ish is a no brainer and the best purchase you’ll ever make.

Why is it a no-brainer? It’s not like the money goes to support the
Rails core team.

AWDWR is a no brainer because I learned more about Rails in 1 week than
I did in 3 months of looking at resources on the net and I find myself
answering the same questions over and over again that are covered in the
book. If the info was so easily found the questions would not be asked.
It’s also pretty up to date.

Otherwise go and google Ryan B. Rails casts and see what others in
here recommend

Yesyesyes. Railscasts (and ASCIIcasts) freakin’ rock!

but AWDWR is my Rails bible

I understand that it’s very good. Just by way of comparison, though, I
am an experienced Rails developer who’s never read a single commercial
Rails book (aside from leafing through a couple in the bookstore).
Depending on your learning style, it may be feasible.

I have not come accross anyone that has had the latet book onthat
regrets doing so. Have you got it?

along with the pickaxe book
on Ruby (But that is for later :-))

No! The pickaxe book is not “for later”. To use Rails effectively,
it is essential to have a good basic understanding of how Ruby works.

Let me qualify that

It is most definitely for later if you have the AWDWR book. A newbie to
Rails never mind a newbie to development has enough to get their head
round and AWDWR teaches you 90% of what you need to know to write a
professional application in RoR.'s essential, and it’s for later if you
have the AWDWR book

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

James W. wrote:

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

Why is it a no-brainer? It’s not like the money goes to support the
Rails core team.

AWDWR is recommended reading on the Rails website.
[…]
David Heinemeier H. is the creator of
the Rails framework.

I got confused about the authorship somehow – I didn’t think DHH was
involved.

Can’t think of a better way of learning Rails than by learning from the
guys that know what they are doing

Me, I’d rather write code than read books, particularly when the books
are about a framework that changes so fast that the books go out of date
as soon as they’re published.

But yeah, from everything I’ve heard, if you’re going to read one Rails
book, that’s the one.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

Why is it a no-brainer? It’s not like the money goes to support the
Rails core team.

AWDWR is recommended reading on the Rails website.

Quote from the publishers The Pragmatic Bookshelf

Sam Ruby is a prominent software developer who has made significant
contributions to many of the Apache Software Foundation’s open source
software projects, and to the standardization of web feeds via his
involvement with the Atom web feed standard and the popular Feed
Validator web service. He currently holds a Senior Technical Staff
Member position in the Emerging Technologies Group of IBM. As one of the
authors of the Agile Manifesto, Dave T. understands agility. As the
author of Programming Ruby, he understands Ruby and how to describe
writing Ruby applications. David Heinemeier H. is the creator of
the Rails framework.

Can’t think of a better way of learning Rails than by learning from the
guys that know what they are doing

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

James W. wrote:

Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

Why is it a no-brainer? It’s not like the money goes to support the
Rails core team.

AWDWR is recommended reading on the Rails website.
[…]
David Heinemeier H. is the creator of
the Rails framework.

I got confused about the authorship somehow – I didn’t think DHH was
involved.

Can’t think of a better way of learning Rails than by learning from the
guys that know what they are doing

Me, I’d rather write code than read books, particularly when the books
are about a framework that changes so fast that the books go out of date
as soon as they’re published.

You might have gathered that I’m a big fan of AWDWR
and it’s precisely for this reason that I love the book becaue it builds
a whole application and you code as you read.

But it goes a lot further than that.

It covers everything in quite a lot of detail from how to get your code
into source control, how to write tests, security, deployments, advanced
techniques as well as chapters that delve into the depths of each of the
packs.

Plus, as things change in Rails you get free updates to the book (At
least I did whilst the book was in BETA) and Sam promised me that they
would #ook into my suggestion for a subscription type of option, for
those who wish to keep up with events after the book was released but
don’t want to go through the whole depot and blog apps again.

Sorry to rant on about this book but I was in exactly the same situation
as the OP when I asked exactly the same question on another forum and
someone pointed me in the direction of AWDWR and I’m so glad that I took
the advice.
:slight_smile:

But yeah, from everything I’ve heard, if you’re going to read one Rails
book, that’s the one.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Thank you for the tips.

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