Odd Ruby/Rubygems/gem path problem


#1

I’ve spent too much time trying to solve this little problem. I wonder
if you can help:

I work on a Mac OS X Leopard. I recently started using a different
account as my primary login. Things that shouldnt have, started
breaking. I suspect permissions, file ownership etc problems. But
check this out

I am using shoulda as a random example gem, this example has nothing

to do specifically with shoulda

see that I do have shoulda installed:

$ gem which shoulda
(checking gem thoughtbot-shoulda-2.10.1 for shoulda)
/opt/local/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/thoughtbot-shoulda-2.10.1/lib/shoulda.rb

see that I have Ruby automatically searching for gems

$ echo $RUBYOPT
rubygems

see that my ruby install works for a trivial case

$ ruby -e “puts 1”
1

see that it refuses to see the shoulda gem from the command line

$ ruby -rshoulda -e “puts 1”
ruby: no such file to load – shoulda (LoadError)
$ ruby -rubygems -rshoulda -e “puts 1”
ruby: no such file to load – shoulda (LoadError)
$ ruby -rubygems -rshoulda -e “puts 1”

#see this trivial program:
$ cat test1.rb
require ‘rubygems’
require ‘shoulda’
puts gem which shoulda/mydev/graphicsplay

does work as expected

$ ruby test1.rb
(checking gem thoughtbot-shoulda-2.10.1 for shoulda)
/opt/local/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/thoughtbot-shoulda-2.10.1/lib/shoulda.rb
/mydev/graphicsplay$

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. It’s probably something

stupid I am just missing it…

Thanks!

Pito


#2

On Apr 24, 2009, at 13:49, Pito S. wrote:

see that it refuses to see the shoulda gem from the command line

$ ruby -rshoulda -e “puts 1”
ruby: no such file to load – shoulda (LoadError)
$ ruby -rubygems -rshoulda -e “puts 1”
ruby: no such file to load – shoulda (LoadError)
$ ruby -rubygems -rshoulda -e “puts 1”

the -r command line option uses rb_require() the C function, not
Kernel#require the method. 1.9 does not have this limitation.


#3

Eric H. wrote:

On Apr 24, 2009, at 13:49, Pito S. wrote:

see that it refuses to see the shoulda gem from the command line

$ ruby -rshoulda -e “puts 1”
ruby: no such file to load – shoulda (LoadError)
$ ruby -rubygems -rshoulda -e “puts 1”
ruby: no such file to load – shoulda (LoadError)
$ ruby -rubygems -rshoulda -e “puts 1”

the -r command line option uses rb_require() the C function, not
Kernel#require the method. 1.9 does not have this limitation.

Eric, thanks. I am not sure of the implication of that. Are you saying
therefore that one cannot rely on -rrubygems -rshoulda to work?

  • Pito

#4

On Apr 24, 2009, at 17:38, Pito S. wrote:

the -r command line option uses rb_require() the C function, not
Kernel#require the method. 1.9 does not have this limitation.

Eric, thanks. I am not sure of the implication of that. Are you saying
therefore that one cannot rely on -rrubygems -rshoulda to work?

With ruby 1.8, no. There is a workaround though:

ruby -rubygems -e ‘require “shoulda”; …’


#5

Pito S. schrieb:

Another slight confusion: I’ve read about -rubygems as well as putting
-Cdirectory cd to directory, before executing your script
-n assume ‘while gets(); … end’ loop around your script
-x[directory] strip off text before #!ruby line and perhaps cd to

At this point I am just confused and curious about what’s going on.
What’s up with that -rubygems switch?
in fact it’s just the -r switch with ubygems to load
I have the ubygems.rb in /usr/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/
and the first line says:

This file allows for the running of rubygems with a nice

command line look-and-feel: ruby -rubygems foo.rb

all code it contains is:
require ‘rubygems’


#6

On Friday 24 April 2009 16:34:47 Eric H. wrote:

the -r command line option uses rb_require() the C function, not
Kernel#require the method. 1.9 does not have this limitation.

However, 1.9’s Kernel#autoload does seem to have that very limitation.

Worse, I cannot figure out how to duplicate autoload in pure Ruby, at
least on
1.9. I could do it in Rubinius, I think.

Is there a reason for this? Should I file a bug?


#7

Eric H. wrote:

On Apr 24, 2009, at 17:38, Pito S. wrote:

the -r command line option uses rb_require() the C function, not
Kernel#require the method. 1.9 does not have this limitation.

Eric, thanks. I am not sure of the implication of that. Are you saying
therefore that one cannot rely on -rrubygems -rshoulda to work?

With ruby 1.8, no. There is a workaround though:

ruby -rubygems -e ‘require “shoulda”; …’

Another slight confusion: I’ve read about -rubygems as well as putting
“rubygems” into RUBY_OPT in a document about gems.

But, in fact if I do a man ruby or a ruby --help there’s no mention of
the -rubygems option:

$ruby --h
Usage: ruby [switches] [–] [programfile] [arguments]
-0[octal] specify record separator (\0, if no argument)
-a autosplit mode with -n or -p (splits $_ into $F)
-c check syntax only
-Cdirectory cd to directory, before executing your script
-d set debugging flags (set $DEBUG to true)
-e ‘command’ one line of script. Several -e’s allowed. Omit
[programfile]
-Fpattern split() pattern for autosplit (-a)
-i[extension] edit ARGV files in place (make backup if extension
supplied)
-Idirectory specify $LOAD_PATH directory (may be used more than
once)
-Kkcode specifies KANJI (Japanese) code-set
-l enable line ending processing
-n assume ‘while gets(); … end’ loop around your script
-p assume loop like -n but print line also like sed
-rlibrary require the library, before executing your script
-s enable some switch parsing for switches after script
name
-S look for the script using PATH environment variable
-T[level] turn on tainting checks
-v print version number, then turn on verbose mode
-w turn warnings on for your script
-W[level] set warning level; 0=silence, 1=medium, 2=verbose
(default)
-x[directory] strip off text before #!ruby line and perhaps cd to
directory
–copyright print the copyright
–version print the version

$ ruby -v
ruby 1.8.7 (2009-04-08 patchlevel 160) [powerpc-darwin9]

By the way, my ruby install is via port, in case that matters.
$ which ruby
/opt/local/bin/ruby

At this point I am just confused and curious about what’s going on.
What’s up with that -rubygems switch?