Objects within objects...?

I have a thought in my head, but I don’t know how to implement it, or
even if I am thinking about it in the right way… what I want to do is
store information in a header detail type way, but I would like to be
able to use methods directly on my data. I guess the example I have
pictured in my head is:
dealership_obj = dealership.new
and within that If I had data on vehicles it would be:
dealership.honda.new(data)
dealership.ford.new(data)
etc.

Am I thinking about this right? is there a better way but I just don’t
see it?

any ideas or links to web pages would be greatly appreciated!

Brandon

On Wed, 19 Jul 2006 07:26:36 +0200, Brandon Coleman
[email protected]
wrote:

Am I thinking about this right? is there a better way but I just don’t
see it?

any ideas or links to web pages would be greatly appreciated!

Brandon

For your example, is the following what you were thinking about?

------- Code --------

class Dealership
attr_accessor :honda, :ford
def initialize
@honda=Honda.new
@ford=Ford.new
end
end
class Honda
def to_s
return “Honda”
end
end
class Ford
def to_s
return “Ford’s to-string”
end
end

dealership_obj = Dealership.new
puts dealership_obj.honda
puts dealership_obj.ford

------- End Code --------

Wes Oldenbeuving

dealership_obj = Dealership.new
puts dealership_obj.honda
puts dealership_obj.ford

Yes it is! but I would like to be able to add and delete objects on the
fly. For instance I want to add Toyota: could the objects be stored in
an array so that I could add an object and delete an object when I
needed? I would like to be able to say something like
dealership.add(toyota.new(etc etc)) dealership.puts(toyota) I think
talking about it is showing the weakness of my idea. because then I
would probably need a dealership.modify(toyota.something()) and I would
really like to nest my objects about 4 deep.
Talking about it brought me to this example:

dealership.modify(toyota.modify(shelfb.add(bin1.new(carburetor)))).

which IS what I think I would like to do, I just think that code is ugly
and illedgible, and so I feel there is probably a better way.

Brandon

Brandon Coleman wrote:

dealership_obj = Dealership.new
puts dealership_obj.honda
puts dealership_obj.ford

Yes it is! but I would like to be able to add and delete objects on the
fly. For instance I want to add Toyota: could the objects be stored in
an array so that I could add an object and delete an object when I
needed? I would like to be able to say something like
dealership.add(toyota.new(etc etc)) dealership.puts(toyota) I think
talking about it is showing the weakness of my idea. because then I
would probably need a dealership.modify(toyota.something()) and I would
really like to nest my objects about 4 deep.
Talking about it brought me to this example:

dealership.modify(toyota.modify(shelfb.add(bin1.new(carburetor)))).

which IS what I think I would like to do, I just think that code is ugly
and illedgible, and so I feel there is probably a better way.

Brandon
…brandon…while i’m still a newbie at this…a perfect example is
the free tutorial learn-ruby…that does exactly what you want but with
address book as an example…each person is an address entry (really a
hash storing name,email,address,city,state) aka a car object (with hash
keys like carb tranny,etc…)…then an address book
is an object collection of many persons objects collected into an
array…

Thank you for taking the time to answer my question! that REALLY helped
push me in the right direction. :slight_smile:

Brandon

On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 03:24:05 +0200, Brandon Coleman
[email protected]
wrote:

Thank you for taking the time to answer my question! that REALLY helped
push me in the right direction. :slight_smile:

Brandon

My pleasure.

Wes

On Wed, 19 Jul 2006 14:56:24 +0200, Brandon Coleman
[email protected]
wrote:

Yes it is! but I would like to be able to add and delete objects on the
fly. For instance I want to add Toyota: could the objects be stored in
an array so that I could add an object and delete an object when I
needed?

I think that the easiest way to achieve something like this is to use a
hash.

Another way would be to try and setup something with
Kernel#method_missing. That way you could redirect invalid method calls
to
the hash, or whichever way you use to track things internally. The docs
for Kernel#method_missing:
http://www.ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Kernel.html#M002946

Here is an example using both methods:

----- Code -----

class Dealership
def initialize
@items=Hash.new
end
def add(name,new_item)
@items[name]=new_item
end
def
@items[name]
end
def method_missing(methId)
str = methId.id2name
self.
end
end

class Honda
def to_s
return “Honda”
end
end

class Ford
def sound_horn
puts “You sound the Ford’s horn!”
end
end

dealership_obj = Dealership.new

dealership_obj.add(“honda”, Honda.new)
dealership_obj.add(“ford”, Ford.new)

puts dealership_obj[“honda”]
dealership_obj[“ford”].sound_horn
dealership_obj.ford.sound_horn

----- End code -----

Talking about it brought me to this example:

dealership.modify(toyota.modify(shelfb.add(bin1.new(carburetor)))).

which IS what I think I would like to do, I just think that code is ugly
and illedgible, and so I feel there is probably a better way.

By putting the hash and method_missing inside the car brand classes and
classes that will be contained by them, your given example would look
like:

dealership.toyota.shelfb.add(‘bin1’,Bin1.new(carburetor))

Cheers,

Wes

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