(no subject)

On Jul 14, 2006, at 8:31 PM, Ryan R. wrote:

Pathing works most of the time, but I had some problems with RadRails/
Eclipse because it doesn’t appear to honor pathing provided
in .profile or .login. Which prompted the linking solution. It’s a
little ugly and might go away with future updates, but it was about
all I had left for a few programs that ignored my personal path
information.
-Mat

You can change path info in /etc/profile to make it system-wide.
As for ~/.profile, I tried all the shells listed in /etc/shells, and
none
of them ran the .profile I created as a test.

I don’t see why UNIX like systems have to have so many bin (and other)
directories. Let’s see, there is /bin, /usr/bin, /usr/local/bin,
/opt/local/bin, the same variants for sbin, plus executables in
/usr/libexec, /usr/local/libexec and (for shame) /etc.

Sheesh!

Thankfully someone invented the ‘which’ and ‘whereis’ commands.

Regards,
JJ

On Jul 17, 2006, at 3:29 PM, John J. wrote:

You can change path info in /etc/profile to make it system-wide.
As for ~/.profile, I tried all the shells listed in /etc/shells,
and none
of them ran the .profile I created as a test.

I don’t see why UNIX like systems have to have so many bin (and other)
directories. Let’s see, there is /bin, /usr/bin, /usr/local/bin,
/opt/local/bin, the same variants for sbin, plus executables in
/usr/libexec, /usr/local/libexec and (for shame) /etc.

It’s in our blood. Programmers like to categorize things. The
downside is that a lot of apps like to tread all over that
categorization. Ah… life.
-Mat

On 7/18/06, Mat S. [email protected] wrote:

It’s in our blood. Programmers like to categorize things. The
downside is that a lot of apps like to tread all over that
categorization. Ah… life.
-Mat

Paraphrasing from the green book (LAH) and adding a last one of my own:

  • /bin – commands needed for minimal system operability
  • /sbin – commands for booting, repairing, or recovering the system
  • /usr/local/bin – local executables (site-specific)
  • /usr/local/sbin – statically-linked local (site-specific) system
    maintenance commands
  • /usr/sbin – less essential commands for system admin and repair
  • ~/bin – your own commands :slight_smile:

—John

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