Nginx-1.2.6

Changes with nginx 1.2.6 11 Dec
2012

*) Feature: the $request_time and $msec variables can now be used 

not
only in the “log_format” directive.

*) Bugfix: cache manager and cache loader processes might not be 

able to
start if more than 512 listen sockets were used.

*) Bugfix: in the ngx_http_dav_module.


Maxim D.

*) Bugfix: in the ngx_http_dav_module.

Maxim can you be a bit more detailed on this one (using dav module so
interested if affected)?

rr

Hello!

On Tue, Dec 11, 2012 at 05:08:52PM +0200, Reinis R. wrote:

*) Bugfix: in the ngx_http_dav_module.

Maxim can you be a bit more detailed on this one (using dav module
so interested if affected)?

http://trac.nginx.org/nginx/changeset/4955/nginx


Maxim D.
http://nginx.com/support.html

http://trac.nginx.org/nginx/changeset/4955/nginx

Thx.

p.s. using on a fuse filesystem - have never encountered something like
that

rr

On 11 December 2012 15:01, Maxim D. [email protected] wrote:

Changes with nginx 1.2.6 11 Dec 2012

*) Feature: the $request_time and $msec variables can now be used not
   only in the "log_format" directive.

This is great! Could you give some examples of other variables that
these can now be considered similar to, with respect to when and where
they’re available for use?

Jonathan

Jonathan M. // Oxford, London, UK
http://www.jpluscplusm.com/contact.html

Hello!

On Tue, Dec 11, 2012 at 06:46:14PM +0200, Reinis R. wrote:

http://trac.nginx.org/nginx/changeset/4955/nginx

Thx.

p.s. using on a fuse filesystem - have never encountered something like that

This is not about filesystem, but rather about configuration.

Configuring nginx to handle webdav PUT requests e.g. after error_page
fallback from another proxied location resulted in segmentation fault
rather than 500 (Internal Server Error) being returned due to
unsupported configuration.


Maxim D.
http://nginx.com/support.html

Hello!

On Tue, Dec 11, 2012 at 04:44:52PM +0000, Jonathan M. wrote:

On 11 December 2012 15:01, Maxim D. [email protected] wrote:

Changes with nginx 1.2.6 11 Dec 2012

*) Feature: the $request_time and $msec variables can now be used not
   only in the "log_format" directive.

This is great! Could you give some examples of other variables that
these can now be considered similar to, with respect to when and where
they’re available for use?

There are some (semi-)variables which were only available in the
log_format directive, see here for a full list:

http://nginx.org/r/log_format

These variables wasn’t available as generic ones as they weren’t
expected to be usable during request processing. For now this
aproach is reconsidered, and the plan is to eventually make all such
variables generic, even if they don’t make much sense till request
processing is complete. This will allow, in particular, to use
such variables in other modules similar to ngx_http_log_module, or
to log some derivative variables using map{}.

Semantic of such variables didn’t change when they are made
available as generic variables as long as they are used in the
“log_format” directive, i.e. evaluated during request logging. If
you’ll try to use them at other phases of a request processing, in
some cases previous definitions no longer apply or slightly
changes.

E.g. $msec, previously defined as (quote from
http://nginx.org/r/log_format):

time in seconds with a milliseconds resolution at the time of
log write

now defined as (quote from
http://nginx.org/en/docs/http/ngx_http_core_module.html#var_msec):

current time in seconds with a milliseconds resolution

Where “current” means a time of the variable evaluation. E.g. if
you’ll use it in proxy_set_header directive, it will be the time
when request to an upstream was created.

The $request_time was defined as (quote from
http://nginx.org/r/log_format):

request processing time in seconds with a milliseconds
resolution; time elapsed between the first bytes were read from
the client and the log write after the last bytes were sent to the
client

It remains the same when used in log format, but more generic
definition is now available (quote from
http://nginx.org/en/docs/http/ngx_http_core_module.html#var_request_time):

request processing time in seconds with a milliseconds
resolution (1.3.9, 1.2.6); time elapsed since the first bytes were
read from the client

Much like $msec, if you’ll use it in proxy_set_header, it will be
the time from a request start till nginx created a request to an
upstream. And if used in add_header, it will be the time from a
request start till sending response headers to a client.

Hope this helps.


Maxim D.
http://nginx.com/support.html

Hello Nginx U.s,

Now available: Nginx 1.2.6 For Windows http://goo.gl/FMg4H (32-bit and
64-bit
versions)

These versions are to support legacy users who are already using Cygwin
based builds of Nginx. Officially supported native Windows binaries are
at
nginx.org.

Announcements are also available via my Twitter stream (
http://twitter.com/kworthington), if you prefer to receive updates that
way.

Thank you,
Kevin

Kevin W.
kworthington @ (gmail] [dot} {com)
http://kevinworthington.com/
http://twitter.com/kworthington

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