Newbie Question - .RHTML files

I am the newest member to ruby and rails. I have a strong desire to
learn and right now I purchased my first book (Ajax on Rails) with my
2nd on order at Amazon (Developing web applications using ruby on
rails).

My background - I have a computer science dagree taht I’ve never used
and dabbled some with .net but mostly been a Microsoft puppy thus far.

I want to learn RoR to develop web 2.0 applications/tools/etc…
primarily for now in the domain name industry.

My first question is how do I set my account at hostmonster to serve
.rtml files and .rjs files?

On Jun 1, 4:13 pm, Jonathan Goodapsture <rails-mailing-l…@andreas-
s.net> wrote:

My first question is how do I set my account at hostmonster to serve
.rtml files and .rjs files?

That’s your first question? Impressive :slight_smile:

Start by developing your rails apps locally on your machine, learn
Rails first, and worry about deployment later. You can run script/
server from your rails app directory to start a local webserver on
localhost:3000. Once you’ve developed your app, you can think about
deployment, and that’s a question for your hosting provider.

By the way, Ajax on Rails assumes you understand Rails basics already,
so you might want to pick up something else if you are really new to
Rails, and then use Ajax on Rails to get good at the Ajax part.

Jeff
softiesonrails.com

WEll answer me this then…

Should I learn ruby first and then rails?

What would be a good resource to srart first with?

And then can you list a few more resources to go from that in order of
importance please.

Jonathan Goodapsture wrote:

WEll answer me this then…

Should I learn ruby first and then rails?

What would be a good resource to srart first with?

And then can you list a few more resources to go from that in order of
importance please.

Jonathan,

 I'd recommend the book "Beginning Ruby on Rails" by Wrox to start. 

I bought and read the book. It is very good for starting out with Ruby
on Rails. It first teaches you Ruby the programming language and then
introduces you to the Rails framework. I think the book is good for
learning both parts. The book is helpful from the standpoint that it
shows you the code, then explains it afterwards. Another book that I
got which is very good is “Beginning Ruby on Rails E-Commerce.” This is
not a beginner book. What I mean is that it is a book that helps you
begin a e-commerce site using Ruby on Rails. It is not easy at all if
you don’t have some experience with Ruby on Rails. I learned this after
getting the book and then going back and buying the Beginning Ruby on
Rails book. The E-commerce book is good from the standpoint that it
helps you build an entire site so you get an idea of what it takes. It
is not as explanatory as I’d like though. Hope this helps.

Mike

i think deplayment was the headache of ror,i try a lot of to deplay ror
on windows 2003,but always got some wrong.who can help me ,thank you

On Jun 1, 11:46 pm, Jesse Z. [email protected]
wrote:

i think deplayment was the headache of ror,i try a lot of to deplay ror
on windows 2003,but always got some wrong.who can help me ,thank you


Posted viahttp://www.ruby-forum.com/.

Impossible to help you if you provide no information. Try again.

The two canonical references are Programming Ruby and Agile Web
Development with Rails, both by Dave T… I always keep these
handy when I’m programming in Rails just for the reference sections.

There’s really no need to learn Ruby first. Learning both at the same
time is great, especially because Rails showcases many advanced
features of Ruby. As a computer scientist, my recommendation would be
Ruby for Rails by David Black which goes into detail on a lot of Ruby
specifics that are different from other languages without too much
basic programming filler. Ruby syntax is pretty straightforward, but
it’s the dynamic bits that really set it apart from language like Java
and PHP. The discussion of Modules and Classes, for instance, was
worth the price of the book by itself. This is critical with Ruby
because code can be defined in any number of places and mixed in–if
you don’t understand those mechanisms, much of Rails will remain a
black box, and that is a bad place to be when you run into a deep bug.

On Jun 1, 7:18 pm, Jonathan Goodapsture <rails-mailing-l…@andreas-

I haven’t seen the Wrox book myself, but I heard such a scathingly bad
review of it that I’d be hard pressed to recommend it. Hampton Catlin,
who obviously knows a thing or two about RoR, says it’s the worst ruby/
rails book:

http://podcast.rubyonrails.org/programs/1/episodes/hampton_catlin

–Andrew V.

On Jun 1, 8:05 pm, Mike R. [email protected]

Thanks a buch everybody!!!

Well it sounds like I have some reading to do. And I understand what
your saying about that black box because that is exactly where I’m @
right now and I can’t stand it. I want to move forward but I don’t know
where to go because I can’t see anything.

Now while I’m working through these books and examples, what IDE is the
best out there? I’ve stumbpled across Aptana which seems like they are
definately going places with RoR. I also have a hostmonster account with
ssh access to run apps and test. Any suggestions in this area?

Is there a easier/better test ground anywhere?

thanks,
Jonathan

werdnativ wrote:

I haven’t seen the Wrox book myself, but I heard such a scathingly bad
review of it that I’d be hard pressed to recommend it. Hampton Catlin,
who obviously knows a thing or two about RoR, says it’s the worst ruby/
rails book:

http://podcast.rubyonrails.org/programs/1/episodes/hampton_catlin

–Andrew V.

On Jun 1, 8:05 pm, Mike R. [email protected]

Andrew,

 I am surprised I had not seen or heard of that review since I am 

subscribed to the RoR podcast. I don’t think it is as bad a book as was
reviewed. I think it serves it’s purpose. The book does cover Active
Record. I also don’t think the book jumps around randomly. For it’s
purpose (a beginner level), I think it does that job. It makes sense
that if the author has done a 100 other books, that it was not written
by someone very knowledgeable about RoR. I wouldn’t recommend it to
anyone if they have experience with RoR. I started out with a
intermediate level book and I struggled with it. Once I got the Wrox
book, it filled in a few (not a lot) of grey areas. Just my two cents.

Mike

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