New to Rails/Ruby how to proceed?


#1

Being a somewhat jaded Java programmer I’ve decided to make an
evaluation of Ruby and Rails. I’ve purchased both the Pragmatic books
(Programming Ruby, Agile Web D. with Rails) and I’d like to
get people’s opinions as to the best way to use them. When you were
learning Rails did you find that you had to read Programming Ruby
first or did you just keep it by your side for a reference whilst
reading thru the Agile Web D. book?


#2

On Apr 30, 2006, at 3:50 PM, Robert N. wrote:

Being a somewhat jaded Java programmer I’ve decided to make an
evaluation of Ruby and Rails. I’ve purchased both the Pragmatic
books (Programming Ruby, Agile Web D. with Rails) and I’d
like to get people’s opinions as to the best way to use them. When
you were learning Rails did you find that you had to read
Programming Ruby first or did you just keep it by your side for a
reference whilst reading thru the Agile Web D. book?

It really depends on how you enjoy learning.

Much of what Rails is great at… is due to being written in Ruby.
However, you can follow along with most Rails tutorials without
knowing much or any Ruby.

Is your goal to build a web application? Dig into Rails.

Is your goal to learn Ruby? Jump into irb and play around for a while.

Mileage will vary… just remember to do what you enjoy and attempt
to have some fun. :slight_smile:

Good luck!

Cheers,

robby

Robby R.
Founder & Executive Director

PLANET ARGON, LLC
Ruby on Rails Development, Consulting & Hosting


www.robbyonrails.com

+1 503 445 2457
+1 877 55 ARGON [toll free]
+1 815 642 4968 [fax]


#3

Robert,

Well, this is my first month. I used to be a Java / C++ programmer
(well ok it still pays the bills), but only until I can talk the boss
into using Rails for some of the appropriate projects. I have a few
ideas for Enterprise Rails development that I would like to try out…
Regardless, I got the Rails book first and worked through it. Then I
decided for my first “real” application I would simulate something
reasonable but easy. I started with the Login / Authentication portion
to expand upon what I learned in the book. I then added some stuff that
clients would likely want (content management, etc). It will end up
being a quick core application. So far it’s going pretty well. I’m now
to the point where I want to understand Ruby and I’m purchasing the
other book next week to start working through it and enhance my
knowledge.

But Rails apps are definitely possible to write without hardcore
understanding of Ruby. And you could even sell them. :wink: I have one
that a client (ok, a friend, but still anyone who pays me money is a
client) is looking at being enhanced for his line of business. It may
not impress the scholars, but I don’t intend to show the scholars the
code… :slight_smile: It impressed the clients and that’s what matters…

I’m also going to rewrite the core of my website in Rails, including
client account management and such… I think I could do all of it from
what I know now without even reading the Ruby book. And Rails code is
easy to refactor… Of course everything is in a Subversion repository
so…there you go! :wink:

-Curtis


#4

On Sun, 30 Apr 2006, Robert N. wrote:

Being a somewhat jaded Java programmer I’ve decided to make an
evaluation of Ruby and Rails. I’ve purchased both the Pragmatic books
(Programming Ruby, Agile Web D. with Rails) and I’d like to get
people’s opinions as to the best way to use them. When you were learning
Rails did you find that you had to read Programming Ruby first or did
you just keep it by your side for a reference whilst reading thru the
Agile Web D. book?

I’m just coming to Ruby and Rails (although not from Java) and have just
had to try and figure the same things out. Many people told me not to
look at Rails till I was quite comfortable with Ruby, and this slowed me
down a lot.

I wound up giving “Programming Ruby” a quick read, to see all the things
in the syntax and to get familiar with some of the more unique Ruby
idioms. Then, I went through the Agile Web Dev book, building the
examples along with them, and playing with the bits that seemed
interesting.

That seemed to work for me, and if you’re an experienced developer, I’d
suggest similar. I can tell there’s a ton of things I’m doing that
aren’t
the most idiomatic, but I’m getting things done. The idioms and details
will come.

Rails is pretty neat, so far.


Louis Erickson - removed_email_address@domain.invalid - http://www.rdwarf.com/~wwonko/

“Gee, Toto, I don’t think we are in Kansas anymore.”