Nested Models are not connecting/connected

I’m attempting to make a basic CRUD/data entry cookbook. I’ve got a
recipe model that is composed of other models. I’m intending of using a
single form to create the recipes such that n ingredients and n
instructions can be associated to a single recipe.

I understand why it’s not happening I just don’t know how to make it
stop.

This is what I have so far as far as models and schema.rb:

class Direction < ActiveRecord::Base
belongs_to :recipe

validates :number, :presence => true
validates :instruction, :presence => true

def step
  "#{number}.) #{instruction}"
end

end

class Ingredient < ActiveRecord::Base
has_one :measurement
belongs_to :recipe
validates :measurement, :presence => true
validates :quantity, :presence => true
validates :food, :presence => true
end

class Measurement < ActiveRecord::Base
belongs_to :ingredient
end

class Recipe < ActiveRecord::Base
has_many :ingredients
has_many :directions

validates :title, :presence => true
validates :description, :presence => true

accepts_nested_attributes_for :ingredients, :reject_if => proc { |a|
a[:food].blank? }
#accepts_nested_attributes_for :ingredients, :reject_if => proc { |a|
a[:food].blank? }
#we want to resuse ingredients if possible

accepts_nested_attributes_for :directions
#accepts_nested_attributes_for :directions, :reject_if => proc { |a|
a[:instruction].blank? }, :allow_destroy => true
#there should not be an issue with deleting directions associated to a
deleted recipe

#http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/Syntax/Method_Calls#Procs
end

This file is auto-generated from the current state of the database.

Instead

of editing this file, please use the migrations feature of Active

Record to

incrementally modify your database, and then regenerate this schema

definition.

Note that this schema.rb definition is the authoritative source for

your

database schema. If you need to create the application database on

another

system, you should be using db:schema:load, not running all the

migrations

from scratch. The latter is a flawed and unsustainable approach (the

more migrations

you’ll amass, the slower it’ll run and the greater likelihood for

issues).

It’s strongly recommended to check this file into your version control

system.

ActiveRecord::Schema.define(:version => 20110314191853) do

create_table “directions”, :force => true do |t|
t.integer “recipe_id”
t.integer “number”
t.text “instruction”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
end

create_table “ingredients”, :force => true do |t|
t.integer “measurement_id”
t.string “quantity”
t.string “food”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
end

create_table “measurements”, :force => true do |t|
t.string “size”
t.float “quantity”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
t.string “abbreviation”
t.string “measurement”
t.string “measurement_type”
t.string “equivalent”
end

create_table “recipes”, :force => true do |t|
t.integer “ingredient_id”
t.integer “direction_id”
t.string “title”
t.text “description”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
t.string “source”
t.string “image”
t.string “cooktime”
end

create_table “sessions”, :force => true do |t|
t.string “session_id”, :null => false
t.text “data”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
end

add_index “sessions”, [“session_id”], :name =>
“index_sessions_on_session_id”
add_index “sessions”, [“updated_at”], :name =>
“index_sessions_on_updated_at”

end

On Mar 17, 2:57pm, “R. K.” [email protected] wrote:

I’m attempting to make a basic CRUD/data entry cookbook. I’ve got a
recipe model that is composed of other models. I’m intending of using a
single form to create the recipes such that n ingredients and n
instructions can be associated to a single recipe.

I understand why it’s not happening I just don’t know how to make it
stop.

So what’s not working? The models you posted should be ok as long as
the forms are ok too (there’s also a railscast or 2 on this subject)

Fred

R. K. wrote in post #987926:

I’m attempting to make a basic CRUD/data entry cookbook. I’ve got a
recipe model that is composed of other models. I’m intending of using a
single form to create the recipes such that n ingredients and n
instructions can be associated to a single recipe.

I understand why it’s not happening I just don’t know how to make it
stop.

This is what I have so far as far as models and schema.rb:

class Direction < ActiveRecord::Base
belongs_to :recipe

validates :number, :presence => true
validates :instruction, :presence => true

def step
  "#{number}.) #{instruction}"
end

end

class Ingredient < ActiveRecord::Base
has_one :measurement
belongs_to :recipe
validates :measurement, :presence => true
validates :quantity, :presence => true
validates :food, :presence => true
end

class Measurement < ActiveRecord::Base
belongs_to :ingredient
end

class Recipe < ActiveRecord::Base
has_many :ingredients
has_many :directions

validates :title, :presence => true
validates :description, :presence => true

accepts_nested_attributes_for :ingredients, :reject_if => proc { |a|
a[:food].blank? }
#accepts_nested_attributes_for :ingredients, :reject_if => proc { |a|
a[:food].blank? }
#we want to resuse ingredients if possible

accepts_nested_attributes_for :directions
#accepts_nested_attributes_for :directions, :reject_if => proc { |a|
a[:instruction].blank? }, :allow_destroy => true
#there should not be an issue with deleting directions associated to a
deleted recipe

#http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/Syntax/Method_Calls#Procs
end

This file is auto-generated from the current state of the database.

Instead

of editing this file, please use the migrations feature of Active

Record to

incrementally modify your database, and then regenerate this schema

definition.

Note that this schema.rb definition is the authoritative source for

your

database schema. If you need to create the application database on

another

system, you should be using db:schema:load, not running all the

migrations

from scratch. The latter is a flawed and unsustainable approach (the

more migrations

you’ll amass, the slower it’ll run and the greater likelihood for

issues).

It’s strongly recommended to check this file into your version control

system.

ActiveRecord::Schema.define(:version => 20110314191853) do

create_table “directions”, :force => true do |t|
t.integer “recipe_id”
t.integer “number”
t.text “instruction”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
end

create_table “ingredients”, :force => true do |t|
t.integer “measurement_id”
t.string “quantity”
t.string “food”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
end

create_table “measurements”, :force => true do |t|
t.string “size”
t.float “quantity”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
t.string “abbreviation”
t.string “measurement”
t.string “measurement_type”
t.string “equivalent”
end

create_table “recipes”, :force => true do |t|
t.integer “ingredient_id”
t.integer “direction_id”
t.string “title”
t.text “description”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
t.string “source”
t.string “image”
t.string “cooktime”
end

create_table “sessions”, :force => true do |t|
t.string “session_id”, :null => false
t.text “data”
t.datetime “created_at”
t.datetime “updated_at”
end

add_index “sessions”, [“session_id”], :name =>
“index_sessions_on_session_id”
add_index “sessions”, [“updated_at”], :name =>
“index_sessions_on_updated_at”

end

Basically, children need to know their parents. Take a look in the log
at the queries generated, and you’ll see items like:

Querying to show a recipe with id = 1:
SELECT ‘directions’.* FROM ‘directions’ WHERE (‘directions’.recipe_id =
1)

So:

Recipe (top of the food chain - haha)

table has no _id fields

has_many :ingredients
has_many :directions

Ingredient
belongs_to :recipe # table must have recipe_id
has_one :measurement

Measurement
belongs_to :ingredient # table must have ingredient_id

Direction
belongs_to :recipe # table must have recipe_id

That should make your app happier.

Frederick C. wrote in post #987930:

So what’s not working? The models you posted should be ok as long as
the forms are ok too (there’s also a railscast or 2 on this subject)

Fred

Yes Fred and examining my code some more (with the advice I got from
here) that’s my conclusion as well.

I am however getting a different error after tweaking the form a bit. In
short I want to dynamically add my ingredients to my recipe so I can
have N ingredients. I am using jquery to accomplish this i.e. default to
one ingredient with a button to add the N that follow.

Here is my current error:

ActionController::RoutingError in Recipes#new

Showing /Users/mkidd/Sites/cookbook/app/views/recipes/_form.html.erb
where line #34 raised:

No route matches {:action=>“new”, :controller=>“ingredients”,
:format=>:js, :recipe_id=>#<Recipe id: nil, ingredient_id: nil,
direction_id: nil, title: nil, description: nil, source: nil, image:
nil, cooktime: nil, created_at: nil, updated_at: nil>}

Extracted source (around line #34):

31:
32:


33:

Ingredients


34: <%= link_to “Add Ingredient”, new_recipe_ingredient_path(@recipe,
:format => :js), :remote => true, :id => ‘new_ingredient_link’ %>
35:

36: <%#

<%= link_to_add_ingredient “Add Ingredient”, f,
:ingredients #%><%#

#%>
37: <%#

<%= link_to_add_fields “Add Ingredient”, f, :ingredients
#%><%#

#%>

Looking at this error again I thought i had it by looking at my routes
but I lost it. My routes don’t paste that well though.

And to stop cutting and pasting here is my github for the current
codebase: https://github.com/mkidd/cookbook

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