NanoSail-D turns out isn't lost!

If you’re in a position to listen for the beacon packets of NanoSail-D,
some of the details are here:

http://nanosaild.engr.scu.edu/dashboard.htm

Wish my SBRAC dish was fully operational. I’d actually be able to
track it–I’ve got 400MHz feeds, and
a WBX-based receive chain. So much coolness, so little time :frowning:


Marcus L.
Principal Investigator
Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium
http://www.sbrac.org

On Fri, Jan 21, 2011 at 2:03 AM, Marcus D. Leech [email protected]
wrote:

If you’re in a position to listen for the beacon packets of NanoSail-D, some
of the details are here:

http://nanosaild.engr.scu.edu/dashboard.htm

Wish my SBRAC dish was fully operational. I’d actually be able to track
it–I’ve got 400MHz feeds, and
a WBX-based receive chain. So much coolness, so little time :frowning:

I tried earlier today with a handheld Arrow II yagi connected directly
to WBX. I could hear it but it was too weak to decode. A bigger yagi
should give sufficient signal.
In case you receive, it is very easy to decode the telemetry. It uses
1200 bps AFSK FM modulating the carrier, so a simple NBFM receiver and
the audio fed to e.g. multimon
(http://www.baycom.org/~tom/ham/linux/multimon.html) works. Decoded
telemetry can be submitted to the ops team at
http://beacon.engr.scu.edu/Submission.aspx

Have fun!

Alex

On 01/20/2011 08:35 PM, Alexandru C. wrote:

Have fun!

Alex


Yup, I knew it was 1200 AFSK FM.

Good to know you almost demodulated it successfully with WBX.

I rather doubt that I’ll be able to get to my groups 60ft dish before
the topic becomes
uninteresting :frowning:

But I do have a 70cm YAGI in my store-room somewhere, perhaps I shall
dig it out, and
wait for a pass over my city to see if I can demodulate the signal!


Principal Investigator
Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium
http://www.sbrac.org

On 01/21/2011 01:54 PM, Patrik T. wrote:

Hi All,

Is it linear polarized, if so which?
If not, then which circular polarisation?

Patrik
I don’t know, but this, from the Nansat-D mission dashboard, is not very
hopeful:

"

STATUS: NanoSail-D ejected on 1/17/11 at approximately 1900 PST. Beacon
data was routinely received by the public throughout the world from
1/19-21/11, and telemetry indicates that the sail deployed on schedule.
As of early morning PST on 1/21/11, no beacon packets are being
received. This combined with a plunging battery voltage may mean that
NanoSail-D is effectively out of power. The ops team and amateur radio
operators around the world are still making attempts to make contact
with the spacecraft.

We will be tracking the de-orbiting of NanoSail-D over the next few
months, and we will post any available visual photographs of the
satellite, which are being collected by the mission team at NASA
Marshall Space Flight Center."

Hi All,

Is it linear polarized, if so which?
If not, then which circular polarisation?

Patrik

----- Original Message -----
From: “Marcus D. Leech” [email protected]
To: [email protected]
Sent: Friday, January 21, 2011 5:35
Subject: Re: [Discuss-gnuradio] NanoSail-D turns out isn’t lost!

Hi Alex /Marcus & All

I have exactly the same result as Alexandur (not only once)
I guess we used almost the same RCP antenna
http://www.poes-weather.com/~patrik/AO-51/

Yesterday nite NanoSail passed FI at zenith, I could not hear anything
from
it (once the signal jumped but staid only for < 2 sec so I’m not sure
what
it was).
I thought, my system is erroneous? I cross checked against ECHO(AO-51)
today and it seems to work
http://www.poes-weather.com/~patrik/AO-51/Jan-22-2011/
I retried on NanoSail this evning (68 deg max elev) using the new keps
published on the NASA page but nothing, nada.

Sumthing is fundamentally wrong how I/we do it. I guess it could be
LHCP?
Perhaps someone (who speak English) could query NASA on howtos?

Patrik

----- Original Message -----
From: “Alexandru C.” [email protected]
To: [email protected]
Sent: Friday, January 21, 2011 3:35
Subject: Re: [Discuss-gnuradio] NanoSail-D turns out isn’t lost!

On Fri, Jan 21, 2011 at 2:03 AM, Marcus D. Leech [email protected]
wrote:

If you’re in a position to listen for the beacon packets of NanoSail-D,
some
of the details are here:

http://nanosaild.engr.scu.edu/dashboard.htm

Wish my SBRAC dish was fully operational. I’d actually be able to track
it–I’ve got 400MHz feeds, and
a WBX-based receive chain. So much coolness, so little time :frowning:

I tried earlier today with a handheld Arrow II yagi connected directly
to WBX. I could hear it but it was too weak to decode. A bigger yagi
should give sufficient signal.
In case you receive, it is very easy to decode the telemetry. It uses
1200 bps AFSK FM modulating the carrier, so a simple NBFM receiver and
the audio fed to e.g. multimon
(http://www.baycom.org/~tom/ham/linux/multimon.html) works. Decoded
telemetry can be submitted to the ops team at
http://beacon.engr.scu.edu/Submission.aspx

Have fun!

Alex


Discuss-gnuradio mailing list
[email protected]
http://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnuradio

Hi,

On 22/01/11 18:32, Patrik T. wrote:

Sumthing is fundamentally wrong how I/we do it. I guess it could be LHCP?
Perhaps someone (who speak English) could query NASA on howtos?

I believe NanoSail-D’s battery is now completely drained, and is now
silent.

-Phil

Yeah, I couldn’t find the UHF downlink polarization, I’ll try using an
OSCAR (435 MHz) RCP yagi
http://www.poes-weather.com/~patrik/AO-51/OSCAR%20Yagi%20007.jpg

It seems to pass FI at zenit tonite Jan 21st 2350Z
The downlink seems to be 437.270 MHz. I’ll use the TVRX, USRP1 and the
usrp_nbfm_rcv.py in examples

Thanks,
Patrik
----- Original Message -----
From: Marcus D. Leech
To: Patrik T.
Cc: [email protected]
Sent: Friday, January 21, 2011 21:07
Subject: Re: [Discuss-gnuradio] NanoSail-D turns out isn’t lost!

On 01/21/2011 01:54 PM, Patrik T. wrote:
Hi All,

Is it linear polarized, if so which?
If not, then which circular polarisation?

Patrik

I don’t know, but this, from the Nansat-D mission dashboard, is not
very hopeful:

"

STATUS: NanoSail-D ejected on 1/17/11 at approximately 1900 PST.
Beacon data was routinely received by the public throughout the world
from 1/19-21/11, and telemetry indicates that the sail deployed on
schedule. As of early morning PST on 1/21/11, no beacon packets are
being received. This combined with a plunging battery voltage may mean
that NanoSail-D is effectively out of power. The ops team and amateur
radio operators around the world are still making attempts to make
contact with the spacecraft.

We will be tracking the de-orbiting of NanoSail-D over the next few
months, and we will post any available visual photographs of the
satellite, which are being collected by the mission team at NASA
Marshall Space Flight Center."

On Sat, Jan 22, 2011 at 7:54 PM, Marcus D. Leech [email protected]
wrote:

today and it seems to work
Once they unfurled the sail, the S-band transmitter turned on, which has
been draining the batteries. Transmissions have been only
sporadic since then, I understand.

The radio fun might be over but there are still opportunities for
visual sightings (switch to THz frequency :wink:
The AL-coated solar sail is 6x larger than the reflective area of an
Iridium satellite so it may produce some nice flashes under the right
circumstances.

Alex

ECHO(AO-51) today and it seems to work
http://www.poes-weather.com/~patrik/AO-51/Jan-22-2011/
I retried on NanoSail this evning (68 deg max elev) using the new keps
published on the NASA page but nothing, nada.

Sumthing is fundamentally wrong how I/we do it. I guess it could be LHCP?
Perhaps someone (who speak English) could query NASA on howtos?

Patrik

Once they unfurled the sail, the S-band transmitter turned on, which has
been draining the batteries. Transmissions have been only
sporadic since then, I understand.


Marcus L.
Principal Investigator
Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium
http://www.sbrac.org

Uhgh,

That explains it…

Patrik

----- Original Message -----
From: “Philip Heron” [email protected]
To: [email protected]
Sent: Saturday, January 22, 2011 20:52
Subject: Re: [Discuss-gnuradio] NanoSail-D turns out isn’t lost!

I was about to suggest the same.

It is usual that a decayed satellite come alive again after passing
sunlight
(recharging).

NOAA 9 is a good examle. Most likely to hear NanoSail is on the Southern
Hemisphere
at the moment(?)

Patrik

----- Original Message -----
From: “Alexandru C.” [email protected]
To: [email protected]
Sent: Saturday, January 22, 2011 21:28
Subject: Re: [Discuss-gnuradio] NanoSail-D turns out isn’t lost!

On Sat, Jan 22, 2011 at 7:54 PM, Marcus D. Leech [email protected]
wrote:

I thought, my system is erroneous? I cross checked against ECHO(AO-51)

Once they unfurled the sail, the S-band transmitter turned on, which has
been draining the batteries. Transmissions have been only
sporadic since then, I understand.

The radio fun might be over but there are still opportunities for
visual sightings (switch to THz frequency :wink:
The AL-coated solar sail is 6x larger than the reflective area of an
Iridium satellite so it may produce some nice flashes under the right
circumstances.

Alex


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http://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnuradio

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