MySQL Warm Standby

I’m designing a new Railsapplication that needs to offer high
availability. With Rails, we are already getting scalability out of the
box.

We are considering using a Kemp LM1500 hardware load balancer to manage
requests to our Rails application servers. There will be a separate
server running MySQL 5.0 and all Rails application servers will be
accessing this. I’ve been considering a couple of different alternatives
for MySQL fault tolerance. MySQL clustering seems too complicated and
still not 100% bulletproof. The other alternative is to create a MySQL
Warm Standby using frequent transaction log backups and a monitor
to detect when to fail over.

Has anyone done something like this before and if so, can you offer any
advice?

Regards,

Warm Standby using frequent transaction log backups and a monitor
to detect when to fail over.

Has anyone done something like this before and if so, can you offer any
advice?

We’re using their NDB cluster right now. It works pretty well, but has
some big caveats in terms of overall DB size, row size, limitations in
numbers of inserts/updates per transaction, etc…

I think if Rails supported the concept of a write_db and a read_db we
would have simply gone with a single master with multiple slaves, but it
doesn’t so we didn’t.

If one server is enough for your needs, I would simply setup another
server as a slave, then use whatever is necessary to cut over when the
master fails.

-philip

On Oct 31, 2006, at 9:25 AM, Jim Dandy wrote:

I’m designing a new Railsapplication that needs to offer high
availability.
With Rails, we are already getting scalability out of the box.

Hello Jim.

We are considering using a Kemp LM1500 hardware load balancer to
manage
requests to our Rails application servers.

If you want true HA, you need TWO load balancers.

There will be a separate server running MySQL 5.0 and all Rails
application
servers will be accessing this. I’ve been considering a couple of
different
alternatives for MySQL fault tolerance. MySQL clustering seems too
complicated
and still not 100% bulletproof.

It also doesn’t allow for schema changes while online. :frowning:

The other alternative is to create a MySQL Warm Standby using frequent
transaction log backups and a monitor to detect when to fail over.

Yes. This is a good solution, and MySQL can replicate online in near
real time. In many cases, you can also read-balance across the master
and/or replicas as well.


– Tom M., CTO
– Engine Y., Ruby on Rails Hosting
– Reliability, Ease of Use, Scalability
– (866) 518-YARD (9273)

alternatives for MySQL fault tolerance. MySQL clustering seems too
complicated
and still not 100% bulletproof.

It also doesn’t allow for schema changes while online. :frowning:

Actually it does… sort of… you just have to put it into “single node
mode” and then make your change. But you can still serve requests while
that happens… granted if you’re site falls flat with a single node,
then the net affect is that yes, you have to take it offline :confused:

At least, that’s what our db guy does (or tells us he does :slight_smile:

-philip

On Oct 31, 2006, at 10:07 AM, Philip H. wrote:

alternatives for MySQL fault tolerance. MySQL clustering seems too
then the net affect is that yes, you have to take it offline :confused:

At least, that’s what our db guy does (or tells us he does :slight_smile:

Interesting. I picked up a book from MySQL Press on MySQL Cluster,
and on
page 9, it lists inability to change schema while online as a limitation
of MySQL cluster.

I stand corrected, but am left wondering what that book meant by that
comment. Perhaps this has been changed since the book was released?


– Tom M., CTO
– Engine Y., Ruby on Rails Hosting
– Reliability, Ease of Use, Scalability
– (866) 518-YARD (9273)

Interesting. I picked up a book from MySQL Press on MySQL Cluster,
and on
page 9, it lists inability to change schema while online as a limitation
of MySQL cluster.

I stand corrected, but am left wondering what that book meant by that
comment. Perhaps this has been changed since the book was released?

Hrm… that’s a little vague, but I could see that being correct as
well.

We have three front end nodes. When we need to make a change we put it
into single node mode (i don’t remember the exact command) which
effectively disables two of the nodes. However that last one will still
serve up requests.

So, the database is still available, but the “cluster” isn’t really
online…

If that makes any sense…

This forum is not affiliated to the Ruby language, Ruby on Rails framework, nor any Ruby applications discussed here.

| Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Remote Ruby Jobs