Is it true that if you develop with Ruby, you have to ship s

looking at using Ruby on Rails for dev project. one guy says don’t use
it because we will have to ship our source code to our customers.
Anyone care to comment on this?

same guy says Ruby is pretty slow compared to Python…true or false?

hoping to get the straight scoop

Umm, no you do not have to ship source code to you users. It’s is true
that Ruby can be slower in a side-by-side comparison, however, it’s up
to you to decide what’s more important to you, CPU cycles or developer
cycles. It seems to me that CPU issues are much easier to solve than
development issues.

Could you elaborate on this? If you are developing an application that
is
to be client-hosted, what do you ship if it’s not the source?

Ryan A. wrote:

Could you elaborate on this? If you are developing an application that
is
to be client-hosted, what do you ship if it’s not the source?

read this thread;
http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/124249

it doesnt quite give an answer,
but points you in the right direction.

Thanks, that’s what I thought.

At 12:11 -0700 9/18/07, shaz wrote:

one guy says don’t use it because we will have to ship our
source code to our customers. Anyone care to comment on this?

Because Ruby is an interpreted language, shipping source code
(possibly obfuscated) is the part of the picture. That said,
why not do some serious thinking about whether this matters to
you, the benefits to the customer of having maintainable code,
etc. You don’t have to go Open Source, by the way; licensed
source code has been around for decades…

same guy says Ruby is pretty slow compared to Python…
true or false?

Current Ruby interpreters are slower than current Python ones,
but this should change over the next few years. Also, if your
app is scalable, the cost of adding more processors may not be
all that much of a burden.

-r

http://www.cfcl.com/rdm Rich M.
http://www.cfcl.com/rdm/resume [email protected]
http://www.cfcl.com/rdm/weblog +1 650-873-7841

Technical editing and writing, programming, and web development

shaz wrote:

looking at using Ruby on Rails for dev project. one guy says don’t use
it because we will have to ship our source code to our customers.

If the work you’re doing would normally require you to ship binaries to
customers, then yes, using Rails will require you to ship the source to
customers – Ruby does not produce a compiled form for distribution.

same guy says Ruby is pretty slow compared to Python…true or false?
The current Ruby interpreter is one of the slowest runtimes out there.
YARV (Ruby 2.0) and other projects should fix that (dev benchmarks
abound on Google). If you’re writing performance intensive code in Ruby
there are things you can do to speed specific sections up, but if the
whole thing is slow then you’re probably b

-faisal

Faisal N. Jawdat wrote:

if the whole thing is slow then you’re probably b
…etter off not hitting the send button.

you’re probably better off with a different language. Where are your
actual performance bottlenecks?

-faisal

On Sep 18, 3:11 pm, shaz [email protected] wrote:

looking at using Ruby on Rails for dev project. one guy says don’t use
it because we will have to ship our source code to our customers.
Anyone care to comment on this?

same guy says Ruby is pretty slow compared to Python…true or false?

hoping to get the straight scoop

There’s a ruby gem “rubyscript2exe” which convert all ruby code into
an EXE file, so your code can be relatively safe.
actually that guy is slow because he can’t comprehend the speed of
ruby.

asker may also be interested in
http://groups.wuyasea.com/group/ruby-on-rails

Dorren

Dorren_was_here_cuz_goog_keeps_losing_my_favorites

Faisal N. Jawdat wrote:

shaz wrote:

looking at using Ruby on Rails for dev project. one guy says don’t use
it because we will have to ship our source code to our customers.

If the work you’re doing would normally require you to ship binaries to
customers, then yes, using Rails will require you to ship the source to
customers – Ruby does not produce a compiled form for distribution.

same guy says Ruby is pretty slow compared to Python…true or false?
The current Ruby interpreter is one of the slowest runtimes out there.
YARV (Ruby 2.0) and other projects should fix that (dev benchmarks
abound on Google). If you’re writing performance intensive code in Ruby
there are things you can do to speed specific sections up, but if the
whole thing is slow then you’re probably b

-faisal

Charles Nutter wrote recently about some tweaks to JRuby for
performance. It was possible to achieve 1200 transactions with a Rails
app after applying the tweaks. IMO, that doesn’t sound much like a
performance issue.

There are other considerations also. Ask yourself when the last time
you really enjoyed writing code? For me personally, it was about twelve
years ago writing Clipper code. When I found Ruby, it had many of the
same characteristics as Clipper (including blocks) and I started having
a blast writing code again.

Some of you may recall the XBase programming days. dBase III wasn’t
that fast either and was an interpreted language right? Then a couple
of guys came along who decided to write a compiler for XBase basically
turning it into a compiled language (even though the executable as as
big as a house unless you moved the interpreter into its own file. The
result was a fun, fast executing language though. Is there a hint in
there somewhere? Maybe.

Productivity is an issue for many development teams. Ruby/Rails has the
edge when it comes to productivity, but adding in the “fun” factor adds
a bit of a jolt to productivity all on its own.

What others are saying about performance is ultimately true. Is it as
fast as a compiled language? No. Will it approach those speeds in the
future? You can already see progress in that direction. I don’t really
care if it isn’t as fast as a compiled language any. :slight_smile:

Cody S. wrote:

performance. It was possible to achieve 1200 transactions with a Rails

Make that 1200 transactions a second.

If you’re curious, google it.

shaz wrote:

looking at using Ruby on Rails for dev project. one guy says don’t use
it because we will have to ship our source code to our customers.
Anyone care to comment on this?

Ruby on Rails is mainly for server-side development. Thus, the source
code is on the web server, in a protected directory that no customer
can get to, unless you are sloppy with your administration of your web
site or your site gets hacked somehow. Rails itself creates pretty
safe websites and encourages good practices, but you can always leave
some back door open by mistake, of course.
If you use RoR for a client-side application. That is, one
application that HAS to run on your customer’s computer and not
through the web, then yes. You’ll have to give them the source
code. There’s ways to obfuscate the code or have the source code
compressed inside an .exe file as others have mentioned, but that
source code will still be easier to access than with a compiled
language like C++. Overall if you are looking for that kind of
protection, currently only static languages tend to offer that (and
that’s also changing as there are more and better C/C++ decompilers
each day).

same guy says Ruby is pretty slow compared to Python…true or false?

Somewhat true. Python in general is faster for most arithmetic tasks,
albeit there’s relatively not that major difference for other types of
operations. Ruby in general is faster for most tasks that involve
large OO hierarchies. If you also consider the upcoming ruby1.9
(yarv), the speed differences between both are not worth mentioning.
For most applications that are server based, the speed of the
application is more often determined by the speed of the network
connection and the database used than by the language you use to code
it in.

Note also that python also suffers from you having to ship source
code. Python can do a very minor built-in obfuscation by shipping
byte-codes instead of actual ASCII source code, but the byte-codes are
extremely easy to reverse engineer (there are public domain utilities
for that) and will give you an almost identical file to your source
code (sans comments).

So if you are considering python as an alternative to RoR, the truth
is that you won’t gain much on improving either of your concerns.

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