Initialize Struct from Hash

I just want to check I’ve not missed something here. Is there a built-in
way to initialize a Struct from a hash of key/value pairs?

That is, can I shorten the following?

K1 = Struct.new :foo, :bar

module FixStruct
def set(h)
h.each { |k,v| self[k] = v }
self
end
end

class K1
include FixStruct
end

k1 = K1.new.set(:bar=>456, :foo=>123)
p k1

(I’m talking about real Struct here, not OpenStruct etc)

Thanks,

Brian.

On Thu, Apr 28, 2011 at 7:00 PM, Brian C. [email protected]
wrote:

self
(I’m talking about real Struct here, not OpenStruct etc)
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :001 > K = Struct.new :id,:timestamp
=> K
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :002 > K[3,8]
=> #

Jesus.

2011/4/28 Jess Gabriel y Galn [email protected]:

h.each { |k,v| self[k] = v }

(I’m talking about real Struct here, not OpenStruct etc)

ruby-1.8.7-p334 :001 > K = Struct.new :id,:timestamp
=> K
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :002 > K[3,8]
=> #

Sorry, I just realized this is not what you want.
Although if you know the order of the attributes defined by the
Struct, you can build something upon this, transforming the hash into
an array in the appropriate order. Whether that’s cleaner than your
solution is not so clear.

Jesus.

“Jesús Gabriel y Galán” [email protected] wrote in post
#995567:

On Thu, Apr 28, 2011 at 7:00 PM, Brian C. [email protected]
wrote:

self
(I’m talking about real Struct here, not OpenStruct etc)
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :001 > K = Struct.new :id,:timestamp
=> K
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :002 > K[3,8]
=> #

Jesus.

Is there a hash anywhere in your code? How about this:

K1 = Struct.new :foo, :bar

class MyClass < K1
def initialize(hash)
super(*hash.values_at(:foo, :bar) )
end
end

puts MyClass.new(bar: 456, foo: 123)

(stolen from:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2680523/dry-ruby-initialization-with-hash-argument)

On Thu, Apr 28, 2011 at 7:16 PM, 7stud – [email protected]
wrote:

Jesus.

Is there a hash anywhere in your code? How about this:

Yep, I know. How about this?

ruby-1.8.7-p334 :014 > h = {:id => 3, :timestamp => 6}
=> {:timestamp=>6, :id=>3}
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :043 > K = Struct.new :id, :timestamp do
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :044 > def self.from_hash h
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :045?> self[*h.values_at(*K.members.map {|m|
m.to_sym})]
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :046?> end
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :047?> end
=> K
ruby-1.8.7-p334 :048 > K.from_hash h
=> #

Jesus.

On 04/28/2011 01:24 PM, Brian C. wrote:

Thanks for all the feedback, at least I know I hadn’t missed something
obvious :slight_smile:

I found an interesting thread here too:
http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/67759

Tangentially, I wonder if anything like the following (very rough proof
of concept) has been used instead of Struct.

class Hash
def structify!
keys.each do |key|
class << self; self; end.class_eval do
define_method key do
fetch key
end
define_method “#{key}=” do |val|
store key, val
end
end
end
end
end

h = {:foo => 1, :bar => 2}
h.structify!
p h.foo # 1
h.foo = 3
p h.foo # 3
p h # {:foo=>3, :bar=>2}
p h.oof # undefined

On Thu, Apr 28, 2011 at 10:50 PM, Joel VanderWerf
[email protected] wrote:

define_method “#{key}=” do |val|
h.foo = 3
p h.foo # 3
p h # {:foo=>3, :bar=>2}
p h.oof # undefined

irb(main):004:0> h = {:foo => 1, :bar => 2}
=> {:foo=>1, :bar=>2}
irb(main):005:0> o = OpenStruct.new(h)
=> #
irb(main):006:0> o.foo
=> 1
irb(main):007:0> o.bar
=> 2

Well, here we differ

irb(main):008:0> o.oof
=> nil

But the issue with your approach is that it is not dynamic. Keys
added or removed after call to #structify! will not be taken care of.
A more dynamic approach would be

module HashStruct
def method_missing(s,*a,&b)
case
when a.empty? && key?(s)
self[s]
when a.size == 1 && /\A(.+)=\z/ =~ s
self[$1.to_sym] = a.first
else
super
end
end
end

h.extend HashStruct
h.foo

Kind regards

robert

Thanks for all the feedback, at least I know I hadn’t missed something
obvious :slight_smile:

I found an interesting thread here too:
http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/67759

Cheers,

Brian.

Joel VanderWerf wrote in post #995632:

Tangentially, I wonder if anything like the following (very rough proof
of concept) has been used instead of Struct.

That’s neat. However you’d have to make sure you’ve set a value for
every key of interest, including defaults, before calling “structify!”

How about this variation:

class StructHash < Hash
def initialize(h = {})
replace(self.class::DEFAULTS.merge(h))
end
end

def StructHash(defaults)
k = Class.new(StructHash)
k.const_set(:DEFAULTS, defaults)
defaults.keys.each do |key|
k.class_eval do
define_method key do
fetch key
end
define_method “#{key}=” do |val|
store key, val
end
end
end
k
end

Foo = StructHash(:foo=>123, :bar=>456)
f = Foo.new(:foo=>0)
p f
p f.foo
p f.bar

I’m usually not a fan of subclassing core types, but I could be
persuaded here.

Perhaps the initialize function should look like this instead:

class StructHash < Hash
def initialize(h = {})
replace(self.class::DEFAULTS)
h.each { |k,v| send("#{k}=", v) }
end
end

It’s not as fast, but it will catch errors if you try to set
non-existent members, and it lets you use symbols and strings
interchangeably.

On 04/29/2011 01:06 AM, Robert K. wrote:

    define_method key do

h = {:foo => 1, :bar => 2}
=> #
But the issue with your approach is that it is not dynamic. Keys
added or removed after call to #structify! will not be taken care of.
A more dynamic approach would be

That’s intended: #structify is supposed to turn a hash into something
that looks like a Struct, not an OpenStruct.

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