I18n in Rails 3

Hi,
been doing some tiny app in Rails 3 to get the hang of it. From the
official
guide currently I don’t know how to do the routes trick:

map.resources :books, :path_prefix => ‘/:locale’

It’s probably me but I can’t find proper rails 3 documentation anywhere.
Anyone got a link? Didn’t find any more doc on the new router than
what’s on
the routes.rb in a new app.

Thanks!

{ :name => “Albert L.” }

I think you also have to add the :localize argument to all your
generated paths, fx book_path(book, :localize => ‘de’)
Personally I think this approach is a bit crazy, must be an easier
option. Check out my post on this for a solution


module ActionController::PolymorphicRoutes

def polymorphic_url

add default locale from session (retrieved from prefix on route

path)
args << {:locale => session[:locale]} if session[:locale]
send(named_route, *args)
end

Hi,

the option :path_prefix is in rails 3 deprecated an will remove in rails
3.1.

Please use this in you routes.rb:

scope “(/:locale)” do
resources :items
end

and in your application controller:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
protect_from_forgery

before_filter :set_locale
def set_locale
I18n.locale = params[:locale]
end

def default_url_options(options={})
{:locale => I18n.locale}
end
end

config/application.rb:
config.i18n.default_locale = :de

Cheers,
Michael

– Michael V. Herbert-Weichmann-Str. 35 22085 Hamburg Germany

2010/3/4 Albert L. [email protected]:

Hi,

the option :path_prefix is in rails 3 deprecated an will remove in
rails
3.1.

Please use this in you routes.rb:

scope “(/:locale)” do
resources :items
end

and in your application controller:

class ApplicationController < ActionController::Base
protect_from_forgery

before_filter :set_locale
def set_locale
I18n.locale = params[:locale]
end

def default_url_options(options={})
{:locale => I18n.locale}
end
end

config/application.rb:
config.i18n.default_locale = :de

Cheers,
Michael

– Michael V. Herbert-Weichmann-Str. 35 22085 Hamburg Germany

Thanks a lot!
scope should do the trick.

awesome!

{ :name => “Albert L.” }

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