I hate Unity

http://tombuntu.com/index.php/2011/10/03/install-gnome-shell-in-ubuntu-11-10/

Install gnome-tweak-tools to get advanced settings for gnome to be able
to
get your favorite settings after you install gnome-shell.

On Mon, Oct 17, 2011 at 10:39 AM, Robert McGwier
[email protected]wrote:

Bob McGwier
Facebook: N4HYBob
ARS: N4HY

Or do what I did: apt-get install gnome-session-fallback and switch to
Gnome
Classic Mode at the login screen. Removes Unity.

I haven’t heard anyone say a good thing about Unity. It’s an awful
environment to develop under. The first thing I do in Ubuntu now is stop
using it.

I’m now shopping around for another Linux distro if they keep going this
way.

Tom

On Mon, Oct 17, 2011 at 7:28 PM, Tom R. [email protected]
wrote:

http://tombuntu.com/index.php/2011/10/03/install-gnome-shell-in-ubuntu-11-10/
using it.
I’m now shopping around for another Linux distro if they keep going this
way.
Tom

On Ubuntu 11.04 I have installed Xfce desktop ( http://www.xfce.org/ )

  • it is available via the package manager (or by installing xubuntu
    instead of regular ubuntu). It is similar to Gnome 2 and is very
    lightweight.

Alex

Just a couple of lines to cast my ballot in favor of Bob’s complaint.

I had the same reaction in response to Fedora 15 reception of the Gnome3
thing.
That stuff does move too far away from the power-user-desktop concept
I’ve
been enjoying for several years as a developer.

Also I’m a bit frustrated to have to go after that load of “tweaks” in
order
to get a freshly installed system usable.

my best regards to everybody there

vince

2011/10/17 Alexandru C. [email protected]

I have had no problems installing Gnu Radio under Kubuntu.
If you already have a potent machine, try that. It gives the added bonus
of
being much prettier than Gnome :wink:

Best Regards
Paul M. Bendixen

2011/10/17 Ben H. [email protected]

N.B.: What follows is obviously all opinion:

I can’t stand Unity, and the default settings for Gnome 3 drove me nuts.

If you are willing to put the effort in, you can install a bunch of
extensions that will make it at least approach the usability of Gnome 2.

I recommend:
http://intgat.tigress.co.uk/rmy/extensions/gnome32.html
http://www.webupd8.org/2011/10/official-gnome-shell-extensions.html

After installing, restart Gnome, and then use the ‘Advanced Settings’
menu
(which is actually a shortcut to the tool Bob mentioned,
gnome-tweak-tool)
to enable the extensions you want.

I was able to almost achieve what I had in Gnome 2 by doing this -
although
there are still some annoyances.

I really don’t understand why Gnome3 took this giant step backwards, and
Canonical took Ubuntu even further backwards with Unity.

Cheers,
Ben

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