How to serve images that require authentication

Hi all,

I have images that are part of a user profile. These images should
only be served to other users that view the profile. I’m new to web
apps and was wondering what would be the best way to do this in rails.
I was considering putting the images in the db and serving them via a
controller that would check for authentication and whether the
authenticated user can view the image, then send the image. However,
I’ve been reading that this may be inefficient. Any suggestions?

Abhik

I hope this didn’t get lost in the sea of spam messages.

On Mar 29, 1:37 am, apramanik [email protected] wrote:

Hi all,

I have images that are part of a user profile. These images should
only be served to other users that view the profile. I’m new to web
apps and was wondering what would be the best way to do this in rails.
I was considering putting the images in the db and serving them via a
controller that would check for authentication and whether the
authenticated user can view the image, then send the image. However,
I’ve been reading that this may be inefficient. Any suggestions?

One option would be store the images in the file system and store a
reference to them in the database. The files should not be accessible
via an authenticated URL.

A reasonable way to organize the directory structure if you anticipate
many files is to use the current seconds, minutes, etc. in the path
such as:

/images/02/37/file_one-02-37.jpg
/images/07/21/file_two-07-21.jpg

With a fixed structure like this, you can get by with just storing the
file name in the db since the path can be derived from that.

Brian A.

Thanks for the tips! What’s the disadvantage of storing them in a DB?
From what I’ve read, I’ll be pulling the actual binary data from the
database, taxing the database and server. Is that the only
disadvantage? I’ll be initially storing the images on the same server,
so would this be any slower than using the filesystem? I’ll be using
send_file and apparently that loads the entire file into memory which
would be no different than using send_data. Thanks!

using send_file to serve images will result in huge CPU and memory
demands. I suggest using x-send-file and putting the images in the
file system.

There’s links to the relevant software and articles at
http://www.buildingwebapps.com/topic/254-send-files-securely

Michael S.
www.BuildingWebApps.com

If you do end up storing the images in the database, keep in mind that
rail will, by default, use "SELECT * " when retriving the data for an
object. So if you just add a column to your user table that is called
profile_picture, you will be loading whatever is in that column into
memory when you do something like User.find(1). If you store the image
in that column, then you load the image into memory, even if you don’t
need it. You could update your code to specify the select clause–
User.find(1, :select => ‘id, name’), but you would be better off
moving the image into it’s own table. You could create a model called,
ProfilePicture. That model belongs_to :user. User
has_one :profile_picture.

There are other reasons for not storing images in a database, but I am
probably not the best one to explain the details.

I am using send_file (at http://www.thoughtless.ca) to send images
that require authtication. I have had great performance so far.
However, my images are very small. Almost all of them are less than
100 kb–most are only about 10-20 kb.

send_file should not need to load the whole file into memory (http://
api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionController/Streaming.html#M000228).
I haven’t tested this myself, but I have generally found that things
committed to rails work as advertised.

I hope that helps,
Paul

Great, thanks for the tips!

This forum is not affiliated to the Ruby language, Ruby on Rails framework, nor any Ruby applications discussed here.

| Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Remote Ruby Jobs