How can I do this with regex?

I want to grep Delphi “class name” and “reference classes” in a delphi
class file.
How can I do that with regex?

example delphi class like this;

http://exampledelphi.com/?p=62

any idea?

Ahmet K. wrote:

I want to grep Delphi “class name” and “reference classes” in a delphi
class file.
How can I do that with regex?

example delphi class like this;

http://exampledelphi.com/?p=62

any idea?

What do you want to do? Grep through a text for a specific string?

“string”.grep //

I dont think that many will understand delphi here (isnt delphi
graphical btw? not sure how this compares to ruby…) so it is best to
try to formulate the question more ruby specific (or neutral so that
others have an easier time to understand it)

Hello Ahmet:

I’m not a Ruby guru or anything, I still do most of my coding in Delphi
(I
love Ruby but it’s too slow). However, here are a few hints to help you
do
what I think your wanting to do (note: each assumes you’ve filled
current_line with a line of text from your Delphi code):

  1. Returns true if current_line contains something like " TMyClass =
    class
    (TObject)" :
    -> current_line.match(/=\sclass\b/i)

  2. Returns the class name (e.g. TMyClass) from current_line found with
    the
    regex from #1:
    -> current_line.match(/^\sT(\w)/)

  3. Returns true if the current_line variable starts with and only
    contains
    the word “implementation” which will be important for you to know when
    your
    about to enter the implementation section:
    -> current_line.match(/^\simplementation\s$/i)

  4. You’ll need to keep track of the class names you’ve captured and use
    a
    regex in the implementation section to find when you’ve found a usage of
    a
    class. I’ll leave that to you to figure out. However, testing for a
    word
    (i.e. the class name) on it’s own using regex word boundaries with
    something
    like this should help:
    -> current_line.match(/\bTMyClass\b/i)

  5. You can use variables (e.g. each class name you’re searching for)
    within
    a regex by wrapping it in #{} like this:
    -> current_line.match(/#{myvariable}/)

  6. This Ruby feature seems to be very usefull for code parsing, it tells
    you
    that you’re currently between lines that contains “begin” and “end”.
    -> current_line.match(/begin/i) … current_line.match(/end/i)

  7. Google is your friend; here are a few links (including an online
    regex
    evaluator to play with) I found usefull…
    http://rubular.com/
    http://www.rubyxp.com/
    http://www.rubyist.net/~slagell/ruby/regexp.html
    http://codelikezell.com/how-to-use-ruby-variables-in-regular-expressions/
    http://www.regular-expressions.info/ruby.html

Good Luck,

Michael

“Ahmet K.” [email protected] wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Hello Ahmet:

I’m not a Ruby guru or anything, I still do most of my coding in Delphi
(I
love Ruby but it’s too slow). However, here are a few hints to help you
do
what I think your wanting to do (note: each assumes you’ve filled
current_line with a line of text from your Delphi code):

  1. Returns true if current_line contains something like " TMyClass =
    class
    (TObject)" :
    -> current_line.match(/=\sclass\b/i)

  2. Returns the class name (e.g. TMyClass) from current_line found with
    the
    regex from #1:
    -> current_line.match(/^\sT(\w)/)

  3. Returns true if the current_line variable starts with and only
    contains
    the word “implementation” which will be important for you to know when
    your
    about to enter the implementation section:
    -> current_line.match(/^\simplementation\s$/i)

  4. You’ll need to keep track of the class names you’ve captured and use
    a
    regex in the implementation section to find when you’ve found a usage of
    a
    class. I’ll leave that to you to figure out. However, testing for a
    word
    (i.e. the class name) on it’s own using regex word boundaries with
    something
    like this should help:
    -> current_line.match(/\bTMyClass\b/i)

  5. You can use variables (e.g. each class name you’re searching for)
    within
    a regex by wrapping it in #{} like this:
    -> current_line.match(/#{myvariable}/)

  6. This Ruby feature seems to be very usefull for code parsing, it tells
    you
    that you’re currently between lines that contains “begin” and “end”.
    -> current_line.match(/begin/i) … current_line.match(/end/i)

  7. Google is your friend; here are a few links (including an online
    regex
    evaluator to play with) I found usefull…
    http://rubular.com/
    http://www.rubyxp.com/
    http://www.rubyist.net/~slagell/ruby/regexp.html
    http://codelikezell.com/how-to-use-ruby-variables-in-regular-expressions/
    http://www.regular-expressions.info/ruby.html

Good Luck,

Michael

“Ahmet K.” [email protected] wrote in message
news:[email protected]

Michael, Thank you very very much.
It is very usefull.

On Sunday 06 September 2009 06:00:06 pm Michael B. wrote:

I’m not a Ruby guru or anything, I still do most of my coding in Delphi (I
love Ruby but it’s too slow).

I’m curious – do you have any numbers to back this up? Or any real
applications you tried in Ruby, and found it was too slow?

Or is it that Delphi is somehow faster to develop in?

I’m not saying you’re wrong, but I do most of my coding in Ruby, because
I
rarely find places it’s too slow. I’m always curious what those edge
cases are
that need another tool.

“David M.” [email protected] wrote in message
news:[email protected]

I’m not saying you’re wrong, but I do most of my coding in Ruby, because I
rarely find places it’s too slow. I’m always curious what those edge cases
are
that need another tool.

Hello David:

Regarding code development speed: For complex web applications (I use
Delphi’s built-in IntraWeb framework) and many Windows GUI applications
I
find Delphi much faster to work with. The language and DB data
providers
are archaic by Ruby / Python standards but the integration between the
IDE,
language, built in components and the host windowing environment saves
so
much time for most of the projects I’ve worked on (e.g. database
applications, graphics engines, data visualization, data generation /
simulation, general utilities / home projects). I’ve tried Ruby R.
before Delphi IntraWeb, it was easy to build simple stuff but as the
visual
and functional complexity went up it was just easier to use Delphi
IntraWeb.
I didn’t know IntraWeb at the time but it’s WYSIWYG design environment
for
the web pages which was tightly integrated with the Delphi code was so
much
faster to develop with… not like the “code generator / run it and see
what
it looks like” feel I got from Rails.

Regarding execution speed: I love the true OOP and metaprogramming of
Ruby
but it’s so slow executing compared to a compiled language like Java,
C++ or
Delphi. A while ago I wrote a simple test to calculate prime numbers
with
Delphi, Python and Ruby (using the same brute force approach in each)
and
found:

Delphi (v6.0) = 1.52s
Delphi (v2009) = 3.41s = 2.24 times slower than Delphi v6
Python (v2.8) = 54.25s = 35.69 times slower than Delphi v6
Ruby (v1.8.6) = 121.82s = 80.14 times slower than Delphi v6
Ruby (v1.9.1) = 53.70s = 35.33 times slower than Delphi v6

using a Pentium 4, 3.0 Ghz, 1GB Memory, Windows XP SP2. I did the same
test
on SUSE Linux 10.2 and found Ruby to be about 30% faster than the
results on
Windows (note: Python was 20% slower on SUSE Linux so compilers and
memory
management appear to make a big difference).

That’s not the only program I’ve written in both Delphi and Ruby. I
ported
a Ruby XMLTV viewer (which deals with a little over a gigabyte of data)
to
Delphi and the Delphi program ran 2.5 times faster (i.e. 63 seconds vs
160
seconds). The Delphi program was at a disadvantage because the Delphi
component I used applied an in-memory XML DOM approach vs the Ruby
component’s XML SAX approach (i.e. more memory overhead and validation
for
the Delphi program).

The OpenGL graphics engine I wrote in Ruby was very fast in the
beginning
(2100 FPS) for a simple 3D scenes because most of the work was being
done on
the GPU but as the engine grew to include reflection, shadows, AI (all
of
which require more passes per frame on the Ruby side) then it really
slowed
down (i.e. 60 FPS and dropping). I’m still working on this project and
hope
to find better ways to use Ruby but found that Delphi didn’t slow down
as
quickly in similar situations.

I also starting writing a source code translator (which is why I had
some
advice for this thread) which relied heavily on Ruby gsubs. It’s a lot
faster than I expected (maybe %80 of the speed of an equivalent Delphi
program) but that’s likely because the gsubs are doing most of the work.

Ruby really gets killed by looping through stuff. For my graphics
engines
that means multi-passes on 3d objects for the diffuse, reflection and
shadow
passes. For XML parsing that means going through all the records in the
XML
file and parsing the tags/containers. For the pirme number calculator
that
was simple looping. Ruby does great if you can let the behind the
scenes
optimized functions (or external C/C++ libraries) do most of the work.

I"m not saying I used the best designs for either my Ruby or Delphi
programs
but for all the tricks and neat stuff I can do in Ruby there are limits
to
the time I’m willing to invest in Ruby (i.e to write external routines
or
redesign things to use Ruby smarter) to get the speed I need.

I’ve seen the “Ruby / Python / Lua / etc is fast enough for me”
discussion
on various forums several times and it usually depends on the kind of
thing
you’re trying to use the language for. In my case I’m using Ruby for
some
of the worst case senarios that you can throw at an interpretive / VM
language.

However, to Ruby’s credit because of it’s dynamic nature and true OOP I
can
do some things in Ruby for my game engine that I’ve always wished I
could do
in Delphi so I haven’t given up hope on it yet. The speed is the only
real
issue.

Did I answer you question?

Michael

p.s. Please forgive any poor grammer, etc… it’s a long response and I
don’t want to re-read it to many times.

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