Hey, try out Flock

Hello,I’m emailing you about Flock. I’m now using Flock as my default
browser, and I love what it’s done for my whole Web experience. Flock
is a social web browser that uniquely pulls together the people, photos,
videos and websites I care about. Check it out, I think you’re really
going to like it.You can download it for free at
http://www.flock.com/invited/1209451175 Enjoy it!

On 29.04.2008 08:56, [email protected] wrote:

[Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]

Hello,I’m emailing you about Flock.

Another spam which has been reported to Google.

robert

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Robert K. wrote:
| On 29.04.2008 08:56, [email protected] wrote:
|> [Note: parts of this message were removed to make it a legal post.]
|>
|> Hello,I’m emailing you about Flock.
|
| Another spam which has been reported to Google.

Not spam, but PBKAC.

One should remove mailing lists from these sort of invitation services.


Phillip G.
Twitter: twitter.com/cynicalryan
Blog: http://justarubyist.blogspot.com

Rule of Open-Source Programming #9:

Give me refactoring or give me death!
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On Apr 29, 8:06 pm, Phillip G. [email protected]
wrote:

| Another spam which has been reported to Google.

Not spam, but PBKAC.

One should remove mailing lists from these sort of invitation services.

These services should at least add a legend of what they do with your
contact information, or users should be more clever do not enter
account and passwords for these when subscribing.

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Luis L. wrote:

|
| These services should at least add a legend of what they do with your
| contact information, or users should be more clever do not enter
| account and passwords for these when subscribing.

All services like that (Though I haven’t used Flock, which is a browser,
IIRC), clearly state what they do with the address book you hand over to
them.

And it is, usually, an extra step to acknowledge that you want to do
that, and you need to add your credentials.

They also offer you to change the email addresses an invitation is send
to, before they are actually sent.

If anything, it isn’t Flock’s (or LinkedIn’s, or Facebook’s) fault that
the sender didn’t exhibit due diligence.

Usability can only get one so far. It doesn’t absolve the user from
thinking (it can make it easier, though, and most social-web-2.5 Alpha
services are rather easy to understand and non-technical).


Phillip G.
Twitter: twitter.com/cynicalryan
Blog: http://justarubyist.blogspot.com

Youth is the trustee of posterity.
~ – Benjamin Disraeli
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Patrick A. wrote:

| Unfortunately most people still think the internet is internet
| explorer or that “blue e” so don’t expect them to know that kind of
| stuff (though I’d expect that a rails subscriber would know that).
| Facebook and Linkedin et all do know this is going to happen and it
| does happen a lot, so yes, they are at fault too. Twitter I think
| doesn’t do this, it just checks if your contacts are on twitter IIRC.

If any one is at fault, then us developers, writing applications where
dialog boxes are as helpful as ‘An error occurred. The techie tech
cannot tech the tech. Try to tech the tech instead? [OK] [Cancel]’

If developers teach users that text on a button, and by extension on the
screen is an amount of technobabble to rival your average Star Trek
episode, what do you expect?

However: Facebook, LinkedIn, et. al. cannot prevent user stupidity in
that area, short of enumerating each and every mailing list in
existence. And how well that works demonstrates your anti-virus
scanner on the weekly update.

They do what they can, by making the invitations a two-step opt-in
process. They do not blindly fire off emails (well, reputable
networking/social sites, anyway) without your say-so.

They cannot replace the human. And if we teach the human in front of a
computer that they are hard and mysterious, that’s what we get.


Phillip G.
Twitter: twitter.com/cynicalryan
Blog: http://justarubyist.blogspot.com

Ytterby, Sweden begat 4 elements: Yttrium, Ytterbium, Terbium, Erbium
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If anything, it isn’t Flock’s (or LinkedIn’s, or Facebook’s) fault that
the sender didn’t exhibit due diligence.

Unfortunately most people still think the internet is internet
explorer or that “blue e” so don’t expect them to know that kind of
stuff (though I’d expect that a rails subscriber would know that).
Facebook and Linkedin et all do know this is going to happen and it
does happen a lot, so yes, they are at fault too. Twitter I think
doesn’t do this, it just checks if your contacts are on twitter IIRC.

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