Help/Cannot Open Ruby Project in Ide


#1

I apologize if I’m posting this in the wrong forum.
I’m having trouble opening my whole folder project in my Netbean Ide,
and also in my Aptana Ide, I’m only able to open up a file.rb. I have
the projects stored in the right directory, I just don’t know why I
can;t open the whole project folder in Net Bean or Aptana.

I’m working on windows Vista.

Thanks


#2

Zayd C. wrote:

I apologize if I’m posting this in the wrong forum.
I’m having trouble opening my whole folder project in my Netbean Ide,
and also in my Aptana Ide, I’m only able to open up a file.rb. I have
the projects stored in the right directory, I just don’t know why I
can;t open the whole project folder in Net Bean or Aptana.

They suck. Specifically, they follow the incredibly sucktacular example
of
Eclipse, which cannot even open a file.

You essentially need to write a new program from scratch, using their
generators. They can’t just read the current folder, work the Rakefile,
and
guess that all these subdirectories might just contain your source code.

I have no idea why all three editors are so incredibly popular, but
that’s the
industry for you: http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ConfigurationHell

You will get better help (and less boring dissertations on why they
suck!) from
their respective forums.

Until then, use Scite, and get in the habit of rocking to a command
line, and
hitting to get back to a rake test:recent…


#3

Phlip wrote:

Zayd C. wrote:

I apologize if I’m posting this in the wrong forum.
I’m having trouble opening my whole folder project in my Netbean Ide,
and also in my Aptana Ide, I’m only able to open up a file.rb. I have
the projects stored in the right directory, I just don’t know why I
can;t open the whole project folder in Net Bean or Aptana.

They suck. Specifically, they follow the incredibly sucktacular example
of
Eclipse, which cannot even open a file.

You essentially need to write a new program from scratch, using their
generators. They can’t just read the current folder, work the Rakefile,
and
guess that all these subdirectories might just contain your source code.

I have no idea why all three editors are so incredibly popular, but
that’s the
industry for you: http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ConfigurationHell

You will get better help (and less boring dissertations on why they
suck!) from
their respective forums.

Until then, use Scite, and get in the habit of rocking to a command
line, and
hitting to get back to a rake test:recent…

Thanks

Yeah this does suck, unfortunately I dont know how to run a rake task
yet, this would be a great time to learn how to, also this is a rails
project so I know it could be a bit harder using Scite as opposed to
using an Ide like Netbeans. I do need to start getting more familiar
with the command prompt, so using Scite would be a good experience. I
can build a rails project with Scite right?


#4

Zayd C. wrote:

Yeah this does suck, unfortunately I dont know how to run a rake task
yet, this would be a great time to learn how to, also this is a rails
project so I know it could be a bit harder using Scite as opposed to
using an Ide like Netbeans. I do need to start getting more familiar
with the command prompt, so using Scite would be a good experience. I
can build a rails project with Scite right?

Unlike some platform we could mention, you cannot do Ruby without
learning to
use a command line. Some platforms exploit “vendor lock-in”, so their
language
forces you to use their editor!

I use Kate, and a command line I wrote, trigger.rb, which runs rake
test:recent
whenever any code changes. Then I map Kate’s to save all files. I
leave the
editor over the console, so I can see both, and I just

Even the mighty TextMate cannot accomplish that simple envelop, and I
have
absolutely no idea why it can’t.

Scite will run the current file when you hit . I use that for non
Rails
scripts, because running the current file is probably what you don’t
want. I
should not have recommended it, except I’m in the habit of putting this
icky
line at the bottom of each file:

system ‘ruby test:recent’ if $0 == FILE


Phlip

http://www.oreillynet.com/onlamp/blog/2008/05/dynamic_languages_vs_editors.html


#5

Phlip wrote:

Zayd C. wrote:

I’m having trouble opening my whole folder project in my Netbean Ide,

use Scite

+1 Vim

, and get in the habit of rocking to a command
line, and hitting to get back to a rake test:recent…

Or ^p, or ^[k, if (like me) you’ve set -o vi.


#6

Phlip wrote:

I use Kate, and a command line I wrote, trigger.rb, which runs rake
test:recent whenever any code changes. Then I map Kate’s to save
all files. I leave the editor over the console, so I can see both, and I
just

edit and hit over and over again…


#7

Jeff S. wrote:

Phlip wrote:

Zayd C. wrote:

I’m having trouble opening my whole folder project in my Netbean Ide,

use Scite

+1 Vim

, and get in the habit of rocking to a command
line, and hitting to get back to a rake test:recent…

Or ^p, or ^[k, if (like me) you’ve set -o vi.

I tried using vim before, installed it, opened it up and was very
clueless, I need to take some serious tutorial lessons in order to mess
around with it :). I been reading and hearing alot of good things about
Vim


#8

Zayd C. wrote:

I tried using vim before, installed it, opened it up and was very
clueless, I need to take some serious tutorial lessons in order to mess
around with it :). I been reading and hearing alot of good things about
Vim

http://www.vim.org/docs.php

If you’re on something Unixy, try running vimtutor. It fits nicely in a
standard 80x24 terminal, and should take 25-30 minutes. You could run
gvimtutor instead, but I find that half the power is Vim’s integration
with the command line.

The rest of this post is a sob story that can safely be ignored. :slight_smile:

When I was in college (ten years ago), I had some exposure to vi (which
I found impossible to use, I could never figure out how to exit, and
what the heck were those tildes?) and emacs (which kept messing up my
formatting, and always thought it knew better than I did).

At my first post-college job, I spent about four years using XEmacs. I
lived in it. My mail client (VM) was an Emacs plugin, and so was one of
the web browsers I used quite a bit (W3). Then I had wrist problems
from bilateral ganglian cysts, apparently caused by Repetitive Stress
Syndrom from twisting my wrists to hit emacs “key chords.” The pain got
so bad I couldn’t type. The first surgery was quick and painless, but
the problem came back. The second surgery was more serious, and kept me
out of work, with my right arm propped up in this stupid orange foam
block, for two weeks.

When I finally got back to work, I decided to try vi again. (I didn’t
know the difference between vi and vim, which is akin to the difference
between C and C++). For the first two days or so, it was like learning
a new language. Then, I started to learn “the vim way,” to borrow a
Rubyism. For starters, I didn’t have to do everything directly in Vim:
I could quit and restart at will, because the start-up time was
lightning fast! And then – holy crap – I didn’t need to figure out
(my-what my-elisp-command my-I my-needed), because Vim has special
support for working with traditional Unix command-line filters. It’s
trivial to write a shell script and have Vim invoke it on selected text.
After a while, I could do 90% of what I did in emacs, and do it a
whole lot faster. Eventually, I found out about GNU Screen, which got
me back the shells-in-buffers I had used in emacs, so then I was up to
about 95% of the emacs stuff.

I’m still learning. One thing I missed until recently was the emacs
function that walks you through search-and-replace, one replacement at a
time; then, last week, I learned about Vim’s /c modifier, so problem
solved. I went to learn some vimscript recently, and found – lo and
behold – Vim also has bindings to Ruby, Tcl, and several other
scripting (okay, “dynamic”) languages. The documentation is, as far as
I know, unparalleled.

When I use an IDE now, it’s like a toy. With Vim on Unix (incuding
Linux and OS X), my whole system is the IDE. I’m not an expert on
Eclipse or Visual Studio, but I have used them both professionally, and
what I’ve seen does not hold a candle to Vim. Vim’s learning curve
seems high at first, but if you code for a living, you’re going to save
a heck of a lot more time than you spend coming up to speed.


#9

Jeff S. wrote:

Zayd C. wrote:

I tried using vim before, installed it, opened it up and was very
clueless, I need to take some serious tutorial lessons in order to mess
around with it :). I been reading and hearing alot of good things about
Vim

http://www.vim.org/docs.php

If you’re on something Unixy, try running vimtutor. It fits nicely in a
standard 80x24 terminal, and should take 25-30 minutes. You could run
gvimtutor instead, but I find that half the power is Vim’s integration
with the command line.

The rest of this post is a sob story that can safely be ignored. :slight_smile:

When I was in college (ten years ago), I had some exposure to vi (which
I found impossible to use, I could never figure out how to exit, and
what the heck were those tildes?) and emacs (which kept messing up my
formatting, and always thought it knew better than I did).

At my first post-college job, I spent about four years using XEmacs. I
lived in it. My mail client (VM) was an Emacs plugin, and so was one of
the web browsers I used quite a bit (W3). Then I had wrist problems
from bilateral ganglian cysts, apparently caused by Repetitive Stress
Syndrom from twisting my wrists to hit emacs “key chords.” The pain got
so bad I couldn’t type. The first surgery was quick and painless, but
the problem came back. The second surgery was more serious, and kept me
out of work, with my right arm propped up in this stupid orange foam
block, for two weeks.

When I finally got back to work, I decided to try vi again. (I didn’t
know the difference between vi and vim, which is akin to the difference
between C and C++). For the first two days or so, it was like learning
a new language. Then, I started to learn “the vim way,” to borrow a
Rubyism. For starters, I didn’t have to do everything directly in Vim:
I could quit and restart at will, because the start-up time was
lightning fast! And then – holy crap – I didn’t need to figure out
(my-what my-elisp-command my-I my-needed), because Vim has special
support for working with traditional Unix command-line filters. It’s
trivial to write a shell script and have Vim invoke it on selected text.
After a while, I could do 90% of what I did in emacs, and do it a
whole lot faster. Eventually, I found out about GNU Screen, which got
me back the shells-in-buffers I had used in emacs, so then I was up to
about 95% of the emacs stuff.

I’m still learning. One thing I missed until recently was the emacs
function that walks you through search-and-replace, one replacement at a
time; then, last week, I learned about Vim’s /c modifier, so problem
solved. I went to learn some vimscript recently, and found – lo and
behold – Vim also has bindings to Ruby, Tcl, and several other
scripting (okay, “dynamic”) languages. The documentation is, as far as
I know, unparalleled.

When I use an IDE now, it’s like a toy. With Vim on Unix (incuding
Linux and OS X), my whole system is the IDE. I’m not an expert on
Eclipse or Visual Studio, but I have used them both professionally, and
what I’ve seen does not hold a candle to Vim. Vim’s learning curve
seems high at first, but if you code for a living, you’re going to save
a heck of a lot more time than you spend coming up to speed.

I’m happy that you had a graceful recovery, everything happens for a
reason, look how your injury made you to become more proficient and an
expert using VIM :slight_smile: I’m really going to try Vim out, I tried before and
got kind of discouraged,because I’m still a ruby beginner, but I really
hated to give up on vim, the feeling of actually getting the hang of
something that was once puzzling is one of the greatest feelings. Could
I benefit as a beginner using VIM? I think I possibly could. Is it hard
to build a rails app with VIM? Either way I will go ahead and give it a
shot and learn. :slight_smile:

Thanks


#10

On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 12:03 AM, Zayd C. removed_email_address@domain.invalid
wrote:

I’m really going to try Vim out, I tried before and
got kind of discouraged,because I’m still a ruby beginner, but I really
hated to give up on vim, the feeling of actually getting the hang of
something that was once puzzling is one of the greatest feelings. Could
I benefit as a beginner using VIM?

VI(M) can seem daunting at first, but it’s really not hard to learn
the basics of editing files and you can pick up some of the more
advanced techniques as you go along.

One of the benefits of learning VIM as a tool for editing your Ruby
source code is that you’ll find a number of other uses for VIM, since
it’s a general purpose text editor. VIM, or VI (the original editor on
which VIM is based) are available on most every Unix/Linux machine
that you’ll ever run into, so it’s a good tool to have at your
disposal.


#11

Lyle J. wrote:

On Tue, Feb 24, 2009 at 12:03 AM, Zayd C. removed_email_address@domain.invalid
wrote:

I’m really going to try Vim out, I tried before and
got kind of discouraged,because I’m still a ruby beginner, but I really
hated to give up on vim, the feeling of actually getting the hang of
something that was once puzzling is one of the greatest feelings. Could
I benefit as a beginner using VIM?

VI(M) can seem daunting at first, but it’s really not hard to learn
the basics of editing files and you can pick up some of the more
advanced techniques as you go along.

One of the benefits of learning VIM as a tool for editing your Ruby
source code is that you’ll find a number of other uses for VIM, since
it’s a general purpose text editor. VIM, or VI (the original editor on
which VIM is based) are available on most every Unix/Linux machine
that you’ll ever run into, so it’s a good tool to have at your
disposal.

Thanks

I have it installed, and added the rails plugin, is there any other
plugins I should install? I pulled the latest rails plugin from Github.
I tried to open my previous rails project and it still wont open my
project in VIM, I think its me. I just went to file open went to the
directory where my rails project is located,and could not open the
project folder into my VIM. I can’t wait to get the basics down with VIM
=)