GUI IDE for Ruby


#1

Hi all,
is there a GUI IDE for Ruby? I have to decide on Ruby orJava to start
developing crossplatform gui applications (developed on Linux) and this
info is crucial to me.

Thank you for your answers.


#2

_/At 2005-11-29, tony removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote_

is there a GUI IDE for Ruby? I have to decide on Ruby orJava to start
developing crossplatform gui applications (developed on Linux) and this
info is crucial to me.

Tony, the only IDE for Ruby that I’m aware of is in KDevelop. It’s part
of the KDE package which most-likely is available to your distro… I
can’t imagine why it wouldn’t be. I don’t know if it can run under
another WM, but I can check if you’d like.


#3

On 11/28/05, tony removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Hi all,
is there a GUI IDE for Ruby? I have to decide on Ruby orJava to start
developing crossplatform gui applications (developed on Linux) and this
info is crucial to me.

Why do you need an IDE to develop a cross-platform GUI application?


#4

Komodo also has a Ruby IDE, you can also check out www.ruby-ide.com for
another one. I’ve only ever used KDevelop out of the three. Ruby doesn’t
really need an IDE in my opinion, but whatever floats your boat.


#5

Komodo 3.5 from ActiveState. Windows. Linux. OSX.

http://www.activestate.com/Products/Komodo/?tn=1

Kyle H.
removed_email_address@domain.invalid


#6

RadRails is meant for Rails development, but is great as even strictly a
Ruby IDE. With their latest version, it has quite a few features worth
checking out.

www.radrails.org

Warmest regards,
Nathan.


Nathaniel S. H. Brown Toll Free 1.877.4.INIMIT
Inimit Innovations Phone 604.724.6624
www.inimit.com Fax 604.444.9942


#7

slunky wrote:

Ruby doesn’t
really need an IDE in my opinion, but whatever floats your boat.

Why do you think that it doesn’t need an IDE?


#8

Joe Van D. wrote:

Why do you need an IDE to develop a cross-platform GUI application?

I understand that you can write a complex graphical interface based
application with pure ruby code, but it’s quite a pain in the neck (you
must tell by code the coordinate of each single widget and so on).
That’s also in part the reason why many people spend tons of cash on
Visual Studio: you design the interface, and then you write the code to
make it do something useful. Isn’t it?


#9

Nathaniel S. H. Brown wrote:

RadRails is meant for Rails development, but is great as even strictly a
Ruby IDE. With their latest version, it has quite a few features worth
checking out.

www.radrails.org

Warmest regards,
Nathan.

Nathan,
thanks for this advice. It looks so promising. How it comes that
everything related somehow to rails becomes “gold” ?! :slight_smile:


#10

Kyle H. wrote:

Komodo 3.5 from ActiveState. Windows. Linux. OSX.

http://www.activestate.com/Products/Komodo/?tn=1

Thanks Kyle. It looks nice but it’s pricey.


#11

On 11/28/05, tony removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

slunky wrote:

Ruby doesn’t
really need an IDE in my opinion, but whatever floats your boat.

Why do you think that it doesn’t need an IDE?

Many rubyists do not use IDEs because there isn’t a big need for the
‘tools’ IDE’s generally offer. You’re not compiling anything or
‘building’ applications so to speak, so in general, a set of rdoc, ri,
irb, rake, and rubygems are all you need.

I personally use vim / gvim with vim-ruby installed on OS X, Windows,
Debian/Ubuntu/Gentoo Linux, and FreeBSD.

Takes care of all my needs :slight_smile:

But if you’re looking for a GUI designer, you can actually use the QT
Designer. This is explained in the Pragmatic Programmer’s book on
Ruby QT

My 2 minute long experience with QT designer leads me to think if I’m
going to code QT at all, I’m going to do it by hand.

There is also a VisualStudio integration bridge out there somewhere,
though I have NO CLUE at all how that works.

For GUI’s I generally use Tk or build a Rails application. I’ve also
build some using VisualStudio and C# and just piped in data from ruby
scripts…

You can also build very capable CLIs with HighLIne, if you are looking
for something that just works and is easy to write.


#12

On 11/28/05, tony removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Joe Van D. wrote:

Why do you need an IDE to develop a cross-platform GUI application?

I understand that you can write a complex graphical interface based
application with pure ruby code, but it’s quite a pain in the neck (you
must tell by code the coordinate of each single widget and so on).
That’s also in part the reason why many people spend tons of cash on
Visual Studio: you design the interface, and then you write the code to
make it do something useful. Isn’t it?

With Gtk and Tk, you don’t use coordinates. You pack widgets into
containers and pack those containers into windows.

It’s not terribly difficult, and it’s a better approach than
pixel-oriented coordinate systems.


#13

Joe Van D. wrote:

With Gtk and Tk, you don’t use coordinates. You pack widgets into
containers and pack those containers into windows.

It’s not terribly difficult, and it’s a better approach than
pixel-oriented coordinate systems.

Interesting point. I’ll look into Tk.


#14

On Tuesday 29 November 2005 09:17 am, tony wrote:

Hi all,
is there a GUI IDE for Ruby? I have to decide on Ruby orJava to start
developing crossplatform gui applications (developed on Linux) and this
info is crucial to me.

Thank you for your answers.

The most complete toolkit with available IDE would be
qtruby (qt4 release nears, qt3 is stable). Use kdevelop with this,
designer
app of qt embeds in kdevelop, making code and gui design easy because
they
both hook together. Code generation or loading the ui files are
available.

the second most complete toolkit with just an okay IDE would be
ruby-gnome2 (available in just ruby-gtk2, see sourceforge page)
with glade, you just load the glade generated files.

Hope this helps… Qt is the most stable and advanced, depending on if
you have
the guts to go GPL. If not, use ruby-gnome2

Tsume


#15

tony wrote:

Joe Van D. wrote:

With Gtk and Tk, you don’t use coordinates. You pack widgets into
containers and pack those containers into windows.

It’s not terribly difficult, and it’s a better approach than
pixel-oriented coordinate systems.

Interesting point. I’ll look into Tk.
This is actually a point that is valid with almost all widget systems
except the one Microsoft uses.
V.-


http://www.braveworld.net/riva


#16

On 11/29/05, Damphyr removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Interesting point. I’ll look into Tk.
This is actually a point that is valid with almost all widget systems
except the one Microsoft uses.

I’m not familiar with Microsoft’s way of laying out GUIs. Do they use
pixel-based coordinate systems?

Is that why some dialogs and applications look weird if I use a bigger
font?

How do they deal with internationalization of applications?


#17

Joe Van D. wrote:

It’s not terribly difficult, and it’s a better approach than
use pixel-based coordinate systems?
0,0 - width,height (or is it height,width? I can never remember).
It makes it very easy to build a GUI Builder (I guess that’s why VS has
the best GUI designing facility there is) but is a bitch to control when
you want to have complex resizing and layout.
Is that why some dialogs and applications look weird if I use a
bigger font?
Bummer isn’t? It can be done, but it was not worth the time (can’T speak
for Windows Forms though)
How do they deal with internationalization of applications?
The famous .rc files and long tables of constants :slight_smile:
I’ve given up on C++ MFC GUIs a long time ago and have not had any
contact with C#/.NET Forms.
Switched to Fox and found what I needed for the admitedly minimal needs
outside work (and since I work on embedded systems nobody forces me to
write GUIs :slight_smile: ). Helps that I can use it through Ruby too :slight_smile:
V.-

http://www.braveworld.net/riva


#18

tony wrote on 11/28/2005 8:07 PM:

Komodo 3.5 from ActiveState. Windows. Linux. OSX.

Thanks Kyle. It looks nice but it’s pricey.

the professional version is. the personal version seems to have an
“average” shareware type price…


#19

Tsume wrote:

Hope this helps… Qt is the most stable and advanced, depending on if you have
the guts to go GPL. If not, use ruby-gnome2

Tsume

Another alternative worthy of note is Widestudio (www.widestudio.org).
I have checked it out to a certain degree and it appears to be a good
cross-platform solution. Windows, Mac, Linux, Linux Embedded, Solaris,
Windows CE/Pocket PC, etc. At first glance it doesn’t appear to be as
appealing widget-wise as Qt or GTK but it is portable.


#20

Arachno Ruby is quite good also. It’s still a work in progress but I
love
it’s debugger.

j.

On 11/29/05, gregarican removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Tsume

Another alternative worthy of note is Widestudio (www.widestudio.org).
I have checked it out to a certain degree and it appears to be a good
cross-platform solution. Windows, Mac, Linux, Linux Embedded, Solaris,
Windows CE/Pocket PC, etc. At first glance it doesn’t appear to be as
appealing widget-wise as Qt or GTK but it is portable.


“Remember. Understand. Believe. Yield! -> http://ruby-lang.org

Jeff W.