Good Ruby IDE for Debian Linux?

Hi all,

I’m wondering what IDEs are out there for Ruby in the Linux world?
Anyone want to make some recommendations?

Ron

Aptana Studio is a great IDE!

http://www.aptana.com/

Chris

On Dec 14, 2007, at 10:31 AM, Steckly, Ron wrote:

Ron,

Your best options for Ruby IDE support on Linux are Emacs, VI,
NetBeans, IntelliJ, and Apatana/Eclipse.

I use Emacs and really enjoy it.

Josh

On Sat, 15 Dec 2007 00:54:04 +0900, Joshua S. wrote

I use Emacs and really enjoy it.

Josh
There is also ActiveState’s Komodo

unknown wrote:

On Sat, 15 Dec 2007 00:54:04 +0900, Joshua S. wrote

I use Emacs and really enjoy it.

Josh
There is also ActiveState’s Komodo

I was using Aptana, an Eclipse flavor, and it is nice.
I found NetBean’s 6, I LOVE IT.

On Dec 14, 9:31 am, “Steckly, Ron” [email protected] wrote:

Hi all,

I’m wondering what IDEs are out there for Ruby in the Linux world?
Anyone want to make some recommendations?

Ron

G/VIM is great, if you can learn its “strange” key-mappings and
“modal” editing.

Regards,
Jordan

I use kdevelop on my home KUbuntu system. I have only 512MB of RAM and
NetBeans often stops for 10+ seconds just to move cursor position.

At my office I use NetBeans 6 on Windows or KUbuntu. I have 2Gigs of RAM
there.

by
TheR

On Dec 14, 5:20 pm, “gemblon (t.b.)” [email protected] wrote:


Posted viahttp://www.ruby-forum.com/.

I use Aptana on my XP and Ubuntu.

i’m on ubuntu gutsy, and switched from jedit to gedit
fairly recently, and blogged about it.

http://crepuscular-homunculus.blogspot.com/2007/10/gedit-for-ruby-and-everything-else-on.html

great simple fast editor, can do a lot more than first meets the eye.

_c

Damjan R. wrote:

I use kdevelop on my home KUbuntu system. I have only 512MB of RAM and
NetBeans often stops for 10+ seconds just to move cursor position.

At my office I use NetBeans 6 on Windows or KUbuntu. I have 2Gigs of RAM
there.

by
TheR

On Dec 14, 9:31 am, “Steckly, Ron” [email protected] wrote:

Hi all,

I’m wondering what IDEs are out there for Ruby in the Linux world?
Anyone want to make some recommendations?

Ron

I used to use gedit w/ some home-brewed python (blasphemy!)
extensions. I currently use gvim. Modal editing is weird at first, but
it grows on you. And there are lots of nifty plugins (and syntax
hiliting themes) available. :slight_smile:

Regards,
Jordan

On Dec 14, 11:44 pm, Christophe M. [email protected]
wrote:

Posted viahttp://www.ruby-forum.com/.
Moved with this post I install once again NetBeans 6.0.
I must say that I am very pleased with it.
Last time I was testing the some beta version and it was not match for
Aptana IDE.

Even I use Eclipse (Aptana) a lot I will stick to NetBeans for a while
to see is it an IDE for me. Currently, I am impressed with code
competition.

You should try it too.

On Dec 15, 7:00 am, “Venkat” [email protected] wrote:

-Venkat
Sorry for my typo error.

It is good that it passes throughout all gems and you get code
completion for all of them.
This is good for first time usage of some new gem, ideal for
beginner.

Out of the box the color highlighting is the first thing that needs
adjustment.

Haven’t find the import project option, but it is all new to me and
perhaps just need some more exploration.

I will try to get the best of NetBeans 6.0 before have my final
judgment.

Manville, the Aptana is my main Ruby and Ruby on Rails IDE.

To be thoughtful for most of my everyday small Ruby scripts I use
SciTE.
There is no need to use these big guns when a plain editor can do the
job right.

I use Scribes when developing on Linux, since it was pretty much the
closest thing to TextMate I could find. NetBeans is nice if you have a
powerful machine though.

I’m wondering what IDEs are out there for Ruby in the Linux world?
Anyone want to make some recommendations?

I think you might well survive without any IDE for Ruby. It’s not as if
you absolutely need a complicated IDE - ruby done right is terse and
readable.
IDEs have some advantages but I found them all to have disadvantages,
if only the level of complexity you need to understand with
them - i remember when i first was presented to do a “projects” file
with netbeans :slight_smile:

Marc H. wrote:
I'm 
wondering what IDEs are out there for Ruby in the Linux world?
Anyone want to make some recommendations?

I think you might well survive without any IDE for Ruby. It's not as if
you absolutely need a complicated IDE - ruby done right is terse and
readable.
IDEs have some advantages but I found them all to have disadvantages,
if only the level of complexity you need to understand with
them - i remember when i first was presented to do a "projects" file
with netbeans :)

I second that..not to denounce IDEs..but I think IDEs will always be limited in dynamic languages world for the simple reason
that these languages are much harder to parse and also in absence of type info, it's equally hard to do intellisense 100% - unlike in
Java etc.
Reliable Intellisense is probably the biggest reason I'd choose an IDE over emacs/vi. Pabbrev Mode in Emacs does 90% of code completions and
it doesn't rely on any type information.

Marc H. wrote:

I’m wondering what IDEs are out there for Ruby in the Linux world?
Anyone want to make some recommendations?

I think you might well survive without any IDE for Ruby. It’s not as if
you absolutely need a complicated IDE - ruby done right is terse and
readable.
IDEs have some advantages but I found them all to have disadvantages,
if only the level of complexity you need to understand with
them - i remember when i first was presented to do a “projects” file
with netbeans :slight_smile:

Well … I like Komodo. In general, I don’t think single-person projects
need an IDE, nor do I think pair programmers who are well synchronized
in thinking do. A more heterogeneous project team, on the other hand,
has a lot to gain by using a common IDE and set of coding standards.

That said, an awful lot of Rubyists are wedded to MacOS and TextMate. :slight_smile:

After playing with NetBeans for some time developing some rails
project of mine it makes me go back to my first love Aptana.

At first it looks OK but I have some issues with it that I dislike a
lot.
As stated before, code completion is better in NetBeans. Passing thru
all my gems it gives me the easy way to start using any of them. It
takes some time to start but it works. That is ideal for a new comer.
This could improve regarding the context but it’s functional.
Starting the server and unit testing is OK. Color highlighting can be
adjustable to user’s fashion.
Over all it’s a good and usable product.
But, and there is always a but.
There are some important things that are missing and ruin my
perspective of this product.
First, there is no way to rename the file extension if it’s a known
extension file type. So if you have rhtm file type and desire to
change it to html.erb you must to OS shell to do so and click more
couple of times while NetBeans complains about it.
Second, only the generators are present, and not all of them. If you
misspelled the model name in scaffold generator there is no way to
call destroy to correct it. You must go to command prompt and do it
outside of NetBeans IDE while it complains about it, or do it manually
deleting all the generating files and removing mapping from routes
file. Not a pleasant experience.
There is also unsatisfied control on plug-in installation.
I was so disappointed that I haven’t tried the debugging capabilities.

You should try it for your self to see if it suits your needs.

I, too, don’t think it’s important to use IDE to edit/input ruby code,
vim is good enough.
But how do you guys debug ruby code? log/puts, or the native debug
option of ruby command?
Could anybody recommend some debugger for vim user?

Best regards.
ning

2007/12/21, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky [email protected]:

On Dec 21, 5:41 am, Stephen S. [email protected] wrote:

-Stephen

ning

readable.
That said, an awful lot of Rubyists are wedded to MacOS and TextMate. :slight_smile:
One thing that is done marvelously in Ruby and Ruby on Rails is that
all development can be comfortable done using text editor and command
prompt.
That is the most desirable way of development.

IDE could have some advantages specially in debugging but it is much
better to have a good text editor then an IDE. We definitely sped most
of time in text editor.

You should be prepared to ad hock react on production server when
things get wrong without a flourishing IDE.

ruby-debug (http://rubyforge.org/projects/ruby-debug/) does the bulk of
what
you’d expect in
a debugger. (step into, step over, watch…etc)

Some other nice walk-throughs include:
http://www.datanoise.com/articles/2006/07/12/tutorial-on-ruby-debug
http://cheat.errtheblog.com/s/rdebug/ (cheatsheet)

-Stephen

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