Gnuradio C++ engineer wanted

I hope no one minds me putting this up here:

Path Intelligence Ltd is a multiple award winning start-up company,
whose most recent achievement is winning the UK SEEDA Enterprise Hub
Showcase event, ahead of more than fifty other innovative start-ups from
Oxford and the broader South East region. Although our operations have
been historically based in the UK we are looking to broaden into other
territories (particularly the US as we have recently closed a round of
funding with a Silicon Valley based VC).

As a Principal Engineer, you will:

o Re-architect the system to prepare for upcoming enhancements
o Optimize the existing C++ code base
o Assist the existing management team to continue to build the technical
team both in the UK and the US
o Work closely with the CEO to complete product development and
implement new research initiatives
o Help shape the future of Path Intelligence Ltd
o Work with a young, energetic and ambitious team
o Receive an attractive remuneration package

The following skills are essential:

o Expert C++ skills
o Solid understanding of RF
o Ability to formally communicate architectural designs and plans
o Proven team working experience, within teams consisting of both
technical developers and non-technical project/business owners
(experience in working with remote teams a bonus)
o Experience integrating open source technologies in application
development
o Proven problem solving skills
o Self Starter

Desired skills:

o Proficiency in Python
o Knowledge of RF location techniques
o Experience in working on software defined radio projects and/or
Gnuradio
o Knowledge and experience with RF and FPGA hardware development

About Path Intelligence:

Path Intelligence has developed an innovative product using software
defined radio, that is able to locate mobile phones highly accurately
within a confined area. In the first instance Path Intelligence is using
this technology to provide shopping centres and mass transit stations
with information on people flow through their space. However, this is
just the tip of the iceberg of what is possible with this technology and
Path Intelligence has plans to move into many different industries,
applications and geographies.

Path Intelligence has recently concluded a funding round with a Silicon
Valley venture capital firm that focuses on leading edge technologies
and plans to aggressively expand into the US and Europe in the near
future.

At Path Intelligence, our goal is to provide the most timely and
accurate location information available.To that end, we strive very hard
to hire the smartest people. We’re an environment where great ideas
shape our vision and true passion drives us to the best solutions to the
most challenging problems.

Salary: Competitive + Benefits, with the potential for equity
Location: UK/US
Contact: Sharon Biggar ([email protected])
Reference: GNUPATHCP

Toby-

I hope no one minds me putting this up here:

I took a look at the Path Intelligence website. It’s actually the case
that you
would track individuals to within a few meters using their cellphones
without their
knowledge? What about privacy concerns? It’s one thing to be monitored
by security
video in “expected” places (entrances, store isles, ATMs, etc), it’s
another to be
tracked.

Open source radio software already has run into resistance at the FCC,
not a good
thing. In my opinion, applications like this may not help and could
fuel naysayers
inside the government. They are likely to ask… if you can do it, then
who else
can?

-Jeff

On Thu, Jan 31, 2008 at 09:13:48AM -0600, Jeff B. wrote:

Toby-

I hope no one minds me putting this up here:

I took a look at the Path Intelligence website. It’s actually the case that you
would track individuals to within a few meters using their cellphones without their
knowledge? What about privacy concerns? It’s one thing to be monitored by security
video in “expected” places (entrances, store isles, ATMs, etc), it’s another to be
tracked.

With GSM, at least as far as the specs read, you wouldn’t expect
personally identifiable information in the clear. You would expect to
be able to see a TMSI (temporary mobile subscriber ID). Now, like
many big systems, what’s on the air, and what’s in the specs may
differ.

From a reality-based point of view, if you are carrying a cell phone,
and it’s powered up, you are in fact carrying a locator device. How
do you suppose they make your phone ring?

There is a reason some folks prefer pagers.

You may enjoy reading up on the “Enhanced 911 System” E-911. It
mandates that cell phones in the US be locatable to within X meters
under particular conditions. There are two obvious ways this can be
done: (1) your phone has a GPS receiver (or part of a GPS receiver) in
it and thus has to cooperate to reveal your location, or (2) some kind
of third party geolocation system is used to locate you without your
phone’s overt cooperation. The E-911 stuff was passed under the “If
it saves only one person’s life…” rationale. For additional fun,
dig up the testimony of the FBI director during the CALEA procedings.
Basically he said, “We don’t want the location info, just the call
setup info.” A cynic might say he got what he “didn’t want” by way of
the E-911 “safety” regulations.

Don’t want to be tracked? Don’t use a cell phone.

Eric

Today’s meditation:
If your cell phone is “off” and it’s got a battery in it, is it really
“off”?

Eric-

do you suppose they make your phone ring?
it saves only one person’s life…" rationale. For additional fun,
dig up the testimony of the FBI director during the CALEA procedings.
Basically he said, “We don’t want the location info, just the call
setup info.” A cynic might say he got what he “didn’t want” by way of
the E-911 “safety” regulations.

Don’t want to be tracked? Don’t use a cell phone.

Thanks yes we know this, it’s beside the point. The point I raise is
privacy
concerns, tracking by people for purposes of knowing your personal
habits – not to
save your life when you do dial 911. For example commercial entities
who want to
know your buying habits regardless of whether you manually dial a
number, click on a
web page, etc. I don’t really care myself… nevertheless, it’s along
the lines of
the Beacon thing that bit Facebook. Many people are / would be
“surprised” to find
out someone else knows what they bought, where they went, etc. when they
didn’t
expect it.

Maybe you’re right, it’s inevitable. But I don’t think it helps the
cause of GNU
radio at government agencies for people to be using it for such
purposes.

-Jeff

On Jan 31, 2008 12:52 PM, Jeff B. [email protected] wrote:

Maybe you’re right, it’s inevitable. But I don’t think it helps the cause
of GNU
radio at government agencies…

I for one would be far more interested in using gnuradio to spoof the
surveillance. That would really endear the gnuradio community to the
agencies, wouldn’t it?

:wink:

Frank

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