GNU Radio Scalability

I have a few questions related to the scalability of GNU Radio. Any
insight
would be most appreciated.

  1. I am unfamiliar with IPC, but understand how it could be useful to
    increase computing power. What would be the first step in setting it up
    to
    do distributed computing with GNU Radio?

  2. Does data get buffered in between flowgraph blocks? If so, what is
    the
    block size, and can it be adjusted dynamically to optimize the data flow
    for
    a given computer?

  3. Is it possible to launch multiple fg.start() functions (i.e. Is it
    possible to run multiple threads/demodulations at the same time)?

I am sorry if some of these questions may seem pedestrian, however I am
coming from a more hardware-centric background and am trying to improve
my
software knowledge.

Thanks in advance for any responses,
John

View this message in context:
http://www.nabble.com/GNU-Radio-Scalability-tf1966004.html#a5395252
Sent from the GnuRadio forum at Nabble.com.

Members of Cornell’s Global Positioning System (GPS) Laboratory have
cracked the so-called pseudo random number (PRN) codes of Europe’s
first global navigation satellite, despite efforts to keep the codes
secret. That means free access for consumers who use navigation devices
– including handheld receivers and systems installed in vehicles –
that need PRNs to listen to satellites.

http://www.physorg.com/news71554227.html

That means free access for consumers who use navigation devices
– including handheld receivers and systems installed in vehicles –
that need PRNs to listen to satellites.

Ah no!

(1) The non-free codes will be encrypted (L1P, E6C, E6P) when the
‘commerical’
codes are officially online so you will need the key similar to US
military P
codes
- There will be a government encryption on L1P and E6P and
commerical
encryption on E6C

http://www.galileoju.com/doc/Galileo%20standardisation%20document%20for%203GPP.pdf

(2) From the ‘cracker’s’ website, http://gps.ece.cornell.edu/galileo/
the actual
usefullness is brought into question at the end of their ‘report’:

“Subsequently, the Cornell project team has learned that whereas the
GIOVE-A
power spectrum is meant to be representative of the final Galileo signal
power
spectrum, the GIOVE-A codes and navigation message were not meant to be
the
same as the final Galileo codes and navigation message.”

Still cool they were able to do it, must have been a slow summer :slight_smile:

Ben

Cracking the code actually wasn’t that hard to do. The part that was
challenging for the Cornell group is that they used a simple
omni-directional patch antenna, as opposed to a high-gain dish antenna.
When
you use the latter, codeless/semi-codeless acquisition is easier because
the
interfering GPS and SBAS signals are essentially eliminated.

There is actually at least one other group that did this out of Germany,
at
about the same time. They, however, used the easier approach.

Regards,
Brent

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