Getting the name of the script in use

I’d like getting the name of the script in use, if i make use of $0 i
get the whole path of the script, ie :

/path/to/script/the_script.rb

no way to get only “the_script.rb”

(without using file basename ?)

Try FILE

Michael G. wrote:

no way to get only “the_script.rb”

(without using file basename ?)

une bévue

In the executed script, FILE will contain the same as $0. Cf the “if
$0 == FILE main() end” idiom.

What’s wrong with using basename again?

David V.

On 9/30/06, David V. [email protected] wrote:

/path/to/script/the_script.rb

no way to get only “the_script.rb”

(without using file basename ?)

une bévue

In the executed script, FILE will contain the same as $0. Cf the “if
$0 == FILE main() end” idiom.

Doh. Silly me, I was running it from . so no path was being added…

What’s wrong with using basename again?

Une bévue wrote:

nothing at all, i was dreaming of a direct way to gzt thz script name
alone (for the usage message)…

I think this is pretty direct: File.basename($0) … perhaps you meant
immediate?

Regards,
Jordan

David V. [email protected] wrote:

In the executed script, FILE will contain the same as $0. Cf the “if
$0 == FILE main() end” idiom.

ok, thanks.

What’s wrong with using basename again?

nothing at all, i was dreaming of a direct way to gzt thz script name
alone (for the usage message)…

Une bévue wrote:

yes ! i knew File.basenamepath)…

I know…I saw your first post. But that seems very direct to me. I
think you meant immediate, i.e., without calling a method. There is no
way to do that, that I know of anyway, but you can always do it
yourself (you could even make a file just for that):

direct.rb

$base = File.basename($0)

somethingelse.rb

require ‘direct’
puts $base

I do something similar to find the real path of a script:

realpath.rb

This basically does the same thing as:

require ‘pathname’

File.dirname(Pathname.new($0).realpath)

$realpath = File.expand_path($0)
if File.symlink?($realpath)
$realpath = File.readlink($realpath)
end
$realpath = File.dirname($realpath)

somethingelse.rb

require ‘realpath’
puts $realpath

Regards,
Jordan

MonkeeSage [email protected] wrote:

puts $base
in ruby what’s the meaning of “$” before base ?
a way to get it as global var ?

$realpath = File.dirname($realpath)

somethingelse.rb

require ‘realpath’
puts $realpath

Right, nice idae, i do have a folder “rb” in my HOME/bin where i put
some small ruby scripts like that and some ruby object extension such as
string.

quit frankly i was wrong i’ve believe the behaviour of shell scripts is
different then, i’ve made a riny test in zsh (my prefered shell) :

#!/usr/bin/env zsh
echo $0
exit 0

and i get, as for ruby :

~%> zsh echo_dollard_9.zsh
/Users/yvon/work/zsh/echo_dollard_0.zsh

)))))

MonkeeSage [email protected] wrote:

I think this is pretty direct: File.basename($0) … perhaps you meant
immediate?

yes ! i knew File.basenamepath)…

MonkeeSage [email protected] wrote:

Well, you were right and wrong. :wink: If you run that script (or a ruby
script) from the directory where it lives at, you get just the filename
in $0, since the base path is ‘.’; but cd … and run it, and then
you’ll get a full path. Confusing? :wink:

not at all.

a question apart from that (but linked to)

my script “direct.rb” lies in ~/bin/rb

when using it i do :

require ‘/Users/yvon/bin/rb/direct.rb’

or :

require “ENV[‘HOME’]/bin/rb/direct.rb”

which isn’t “direct” )))

my ENV[‘HOME’]/bin is in my PATH

i know also their is a LOAD_PATH within Ruby.

then, the question :

what kind of var i’ve to setup in order to be able to write :

require ‘direct’

and avoiding warnings of rubygems ???

notice i don’t want my “~/bin/rb” being in the PATH…

Une bévue wrote:

what kind of var i’ve to setup in order to be able to write :

require ‘direct’

and avoiding warnings of rubygems ???

notice i don’t want my “~/bin/rb” being in the PATH…

Two ways:

  1. Copy direct.rb in the ruby lib / site_lib directory. You can see
    where they are like this:

require ‘rbconfig’
puts Config::CONFIG[‘rubylibdir’]
puts Config::CONFIG[‘sitelibdir’]

It is conventional (and easier to maintain) to put user scripts into
site_lib.

OR

  1. Add something like this to every script where you want to require
    direct.rb:

$: is an alias for $LOAD_PATH

$: << ‘/some/dir’ unless $:.include?(’/some/dir’)
require ‘direct’

HTH,
Jordan

MonkeeSage [email protected] wrote:

site_lib.

OR

  1. Add something like this to every script where you want to require
    direct.rb:

$: is an alias for $LOAD_PATH

$: << ‘/some/dir’ unless $:.include?(’/some/dir’)
require ‘direct’

may be their is a third way (using symlinks) ?

not working at the time being it seems ruby isn’t following symlinks

i did a :

~%> sudo mkdir /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt

and then :

~%> sudo ln -s direct.rb /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct

testing this :

— direct_test.rb -----------------------------------------------------
require ‘yt/direct’

puts “$basename = #{$basename}” ### line 3 ###

i get :

direct_test.rb
/opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/custom_require.rb:27:in
gem_original_require': no such file to load -- yt/direct (LoadError) from /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/rubygems/custom_require.rb:27:inrequire’
from /Users/yvon/bin/direct_test.rb:3
~/bin/rb%>

the path is correct because using :

— ruby_libs_dir.rb ---------------------------------------------------
#!/usr/bin/env ruby -w

require ‘rbconfig’
puts Config::CONFIG[‘rubylibdir’]
puts Config::CONFIG[‘sitelibdir’]

i get :

~b%> ruby_libs_dir.rb
/opt/local/lib/ruby/1.8
/opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8

then i must conclude ruby isn’t following symlinks (?) then no third
solution.

the reason, for me, using this kind of solution it’s because i have two
installed ruby (apart from the one installed by default by Apple) :

one in /opt/local… (darwinports)
another installed in my HOME fo JRuby

then , i’d like avoiding copying scripts in different locations.

Hi Une,

Une bévue wrote:

in ruby what’s the meaning of “$” before base ?
a way to get it as global var ?

Yes, that’s correct. So $0 is actually global variable named “0”.

quit frankly i was wrong i’ve believe the behaviour of shell scripts is
different then, i’ve made a riny test in zsh (my prefered shell) :

Well, you were right and wrong. :wink: If you run that script (or a ruby
script) from the directory where it lives at, you get just the filename
in $0, since the base path is ‘.’; but cd … and run it, and then
you’ll get a full path. Confusing? :wink:

Regards,
Jordan

MonkeeSage [email protected] wrote:

Try adding a .rb to the symlink:

sudo rm -f /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct
sudo ln -s direct.rb /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct.rb

NOPE :[

i even try putting an alias file (from folder /Users/yvon/bin/rb) named
“yt” into “/opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8” but this too don’t work…

i’ll stay to your first way solution and do another cp for JRuby )))

Une bévue wrote:

NOPE :[

OK, you need to do an absolute symlink and it should work:

sudo rm -f /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct.rb
sudo ln -s /FULL/PATH/TO/direct.rb
/opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct.rb

Regards,
Jordan

Une bévue wrote:

~%> sudo ln -s direct.rb /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct

Try adding a .rb to the symlink:

sudo rm -f /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct
sudo ln -s direct.rb /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct.rb

Regards,
Jordan

MonkeeSage [email protected] wrote:

OK, you need to do an absolute symlink and it should work:

sudo rm -f /opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct.rb
sudo ln -s /FULL/PATH/TO/direct.rb
/opt/local/lib/ruby/site_ruby/1.8/yt/direct.rb

fine, thanks a lot , that works prety well !

MonkeeSage wrote:

$: is an alias for $LOAD_PATH

Ps. Changing $LOAD_PATH does not effect ENV[‘PATH’] at all (either from
inside ruby or from the shell).

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