Getting started w/ Ruby on Rails

Hi,
I would like to get started with RoR, since it seems to be a terriffic
platform for Webdevelopment. However, I’m unsure what “level” you need
to be on in terms of programming to get started?

Best regards,
Gustav

Gustav wrote:

Hi,
I would like to get started with RoR, since it seems to be a terriffic
platform for Webdevelopment. However, I’m unsure what “level” you need
to be on in terms of programming to get started?

Best regards,
Gustav

Hey!

Personally, i think ruby is one of the easiest languages to learn that
i’ve seen. Its beautiful, elegant and stays out of your way.

I’d recommend reading the Ruby Basics Appendix in the Agile Web
Development with Rails book, then kick right off and work through the
handbook!
The first part of the book is a comprehensive tutorial that delves in
deep on some really cool Rails features!

I learnt sufficient Ruby from just going through the book and trying to
make sense of the code snippets(luckily ruby reads easily and just
reading the code outloud gives you a pretty good idea of what goes
where).

Afterwards, I took my time going through the (free) RubyBook
(affectionately referred to as the pickaxe) and got to know Ruby a whole
lot better, but in-depth knowledge of Ruby is definitely not a
prerequisite to start coding Rails (thoughts anyone?).

I’d think you need to know the basics of programming, understanding
loops, if’s, etc. the Ruby syntax and the Rails implementation you learn
soon enough.

Anyway, I’m by no means a core contributer, but that’s my 5 cents worth.

Ciao

Gustav P.
[email protected]

In order to get the most bank from the rails ‘buck’, I would suggest
being cabable of working with various web technologies (html, css) and
at least familiar with (javascript and database technologies)

If you have done no structured programming before, start by learning
about the Ruby language first. If you have, I would still start with
Ruby to understand syntax and capabilities.

That’s all you should need to make the leap!

Good luck!

Gustav wrote:

Hi,
I would like to get started with RoR, since it seems to be a terriffic
platform for Webdevelopment. However, I’m unsure what “level” you need
to be on in terms of programming to get started?

Best regards,
Gustav

gustav Paul wrote:

think ruby is one of the easiest languages to learn that
i’ve seen. Its beautiful, elegant and stays out of your way.

Agreed that the language syntax is easy to learn, but the language
concepts are more difficult. A highly dynamic language like Ruby can do
things that aren’t easily understood until you really do some mental
gymnastics (functional programming basically). On the other hand, I
hated learning Java because it was all about memorizing long API
classifications, but the language itself was dead simple. I loved
learning Ruby because of the amazingly concise and powerful code you can
write.

I’d recommend reading the Ruby Basics Appendix in the Agile Web
Development with Rails book, then kick right off and work through the
handbook!

Ruby on Rails is an excellent introduction to Ruby, because it lets you
start doing things right away. It’s gonna be hard to just pick up a
book and start programming unless you have some task you want to do in
raw Ruby. Now some people come to RoR with no interest in learning Ruby
at all, and I think they’re just fooling themselves. If you don’t
really understand Ruby you’ll never make the most of Rails, but that
doesn’t mean you have to learn Ruby first. In a way, it’s more exciting
to discover later how Rails accomplishes some of its magic, and at that
point you realize why Java or PHP can never have a true Rails clone.

Hey Gustav,

Don’t worry about the “level” you need to be. In some ways the ruby
language is easier to learn if that is what you start with. I came
from php and I found that I had a hard time getting my head around it
because I was so stuck in certain ways of thinking. Rails can be a bit
mystifying because it does a lot for you that you don’t see, but as
the others said, find a project and work through it. After a while
things will come together. I was a bit intimidated at first because I
had a few projects with time constraints, but I stuck with it and did
them in rails and now I am really glad that I did.

Good luck,
Jake

On 8/13/06, Ben L. [email protected] wrote:

I would say that as long as you have patience, you can learn rails no matter
what your programming level is. Also, though it would probably be a good
idea to start with learning Ruby first (as many have suggested), I would
have to say that would probably bore me to death. If you don’t mind putting
in the time, go with Ruby first.

I keep seeing this suggestion and have actually taken it to practice.
However I think it some ways in put a person who wants to primarily
use Rails in a quandry. I’ve read through the Pickaxe and a number of
other Ruby books but it seems that in order to really learn it you
have to put it to practice. Meaning it’s probably a good idea to
write a few Ruby programs standalone, integrate some of it’s gems and
maybe even participate in some of the Ruby Q. entries. Learning
Rails at the same time can be a bit overwhelming. I mean the amount
of methods alone in AR and AC.

Also, I disagree with the others that Rails is easy to learn. Sometimes one
line of code will do many different things all at once, and it takes awhile
to catch the nuances of the code - as opposed to other languages, such as
php, where there is usually only one thing happening on one line and it is
very clear what it is.

Along with the line of thought above you also need to view code in the
MVC model. Which for someone new to both Ruby and Rails can be
somewhat confusing. I know it is to me.

Stuart

I would say that as long as you have patience, you can learn rails no
matter
what your programming level is. Also, though it would probably be a
good
idea to start with learning Ruby first (as many have suggested), I would
have to say that would probably bore me to death. If you don’t mind
putting
in the time, go with Ruby first.

Also, I disagree with the others that Rails is easy to learn. Sometimes
one
line of code will do many different things all at once, and it takes
awhile
to catch the nuances of the code - as opposed to other languages, such
as
php, where there is usually only one thing happening on one line and it
is
very clear what it is.

But this is also the strength of Rails. Once you learn how things work,
you
can program much faster. It’s definitely (definitely!!!) worth the
struggle. It took me about 8 weeks of working on a project, reading
Agile
Rails, and hitting the forums to become comfortable.

The best advice I can give is to use this forum constantly. If
something
doesn’t make sense, don’t just go along with it, ask us. It will help
you
understand everything a whole lot faster. As soon as I started reading
and
posting to this list consistantly, my skills went up dramatically.

Cheers, and welcome!

-Ben L.

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