Fwd: parse tree redux

somehow missent

---------- Forwarded message ----------

More issues with this. Context in forwarded msg.

Here’s a (probably very naive) implementation of the discussed code.
It takes code blocks, turns them into individual statements, and
module_evals each individual statement. It does this by turning blocks
into code with Ruby2Ruby, splitting the code on new lines, and
module-eval()ing each statements in the resulting array.

If you think about it the problem is obvious. Here’s the code.

def generate(&block)
  code = ""
  statements_in_the_block(block).each do |statement|
    code << Generators.module_eval(statement)
  end
  code
end
def statements_in_the_block(block)
  statements = /proc 

{\n(.+)}/m.match(block.to_ruby)[1].split(/\n/)
statements.map {|statement| statement.gsub!(/^\s+/, “”)}
statements.map {|statement| statement.gsub!(/\s+/, " ")}
statements
end

The problem, of course, is nested blocks. If you hit a block which
contains another block, you get eval trying to eval block-starting
lines like

eval(“block_taking_method do |variable|”)

which of course goes bonk.

Probably what I need to do instead (thinking out loud) is pull the
blocks and statements out of the actual s-exps, like have some method
which takes s-exps and then turns them into blocks and statements, and
work from there. Ironically the blocks it’s breaking on do fine, due
to a quirk in my code, the inner blocks are good but the larger blocks
break.


Giles B.

Podcast: http://hollywoodgrit.blogspot.com
Blog: http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com
Portfolio: http://www.gilesgoatboy.org
Tumblelog: http://giles.tumblr.com

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Giles B. [email protected]
Date: Jan 4, 2008 8:07 AM
Subject: Re: parse tree?
To: ruby-talk ML remove[email protected]

def code_for █ block.to_ruby; end
=> nil

code_for do
?> single_line(statement)

statement(:which => spans,
?> :multiple => lines)

end
=> “proc {\n single_line(statement)\n statement(:which =>
spans, :multiple => lines)\n}”

There are clean ways to ensure it isn’t a proc as well.

That totally solves my problem. Or at least, if it’s guaranteed
to turn multi-line statements into one-liners every time, that very
probably totally solves my problem. (I haven’t tried it yet, I’ve just
proved it to be true, etc.) I can just pull it out of the proc{} with
a regex and then split it on the newlines. Baddabing baddaboom.


Giles B.

Podcast: http://hollywoodgrit.blogspot.com
Blog: http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com
Portfolio: http://www.gilesgoatboy.org
Tumblelog: http://giles.tumblr.com


Giles B.

Podcast: http://hollywoodgrit.blogspot.com
Blog: http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com
Portfolio: http://www.gilesgoatboy.org
Tumblelog: http://giles.tumblr.com

On Jan 4, 2008, at 14:44 , Giles B. wrote:

 statements = /proc \{\n(.+)\}/m.match(block.to_ruby)[1].split(/ 

\n/)
statements.map {|statement| statement.gsub!(/^\s+/, “”)}
statements.map {|statement| statement.gsub!(/\s+/, " ")}
statements
end

I still don’t understand the 1-line obsession… and yes, that is
naive, it’ll break on strings, sub-procs, pretty much all blocks, etc.
You can’t treat “statements” in ruby as each line of a block. #to_ruby
is probably not what you want.

Ryan D.:
i recently started playing with Parsetree and Ruby2Ruby and Ruby2C,
what’s bugging me it’s compleate lack of wiki/documentation - i read
your blog - but it’s hard to distinguish stuff that’s still related from
obsolete.

aside from that, code you wrote is plain amazing :slight_smile:

and i already have few idea’s how to use it ^^

On Jan 5, 2008, at 00:03 , Marcin R. wrote:

i recently started playing with Parsetree and Ruby2Ruby and Ruby2C,
what’s bugging me it’s compleate lack of wiki/documentation - i read
your blog - but it’s hard to distinguish stuff that’s still related
from obsolete.

aside from that, code you wrote is plain amazing :slight_smile:

and i already have few idea’s how to use it ^^

complete lack of documentation?!? I write developer tools. I basically
expect my user base to be able to read code and I try to write the
clearest, smallest code possible such that often doco isn’t necessary.
But in this case I’m a bit confused:

 http://parsetree.rubyforge.org/ParseTree/ !!!

the doco is actually pretty good (coverage wise–I can’t judge the
content as I don’t read it), ~60% according to dcov and it is beating
me up on things like my error classes.

Hmmm. Problem is that sometimes when you look for a solution for certain
problem it’s nice if you have short introduction on how to use it.

If you have to evaluate 3-5 solutions and you have to get to know each
and every one of them it’s really time consuming - short summary is not
enought

Documentation itself is good - true, but it took me few hours of reading
your blog, wikipedia and source code to understand what was basic
concept and how i could use it to make my idea work :slight_smile:

not to mention that someone without solid c background and idea how ruby
internals work won’t be able to understand jack.
I finally got the grasp when i stared inspecting Ruby2Ruby.

and bugs that I reported for Ruby2C were never even acknowledged :slight_smile:

Aside from that this stuff is really powerfull, and having it when
working on FreeRIDE coloring and code completion (which i never
finished) would be awesome.

My idea of transfering ruby code beetween procesing nodes might come
true. And i would like to really thank you for that :slight_smile:

greets

I still don’t understand the 1-line obsession… and yes, that is
naive, it’ll break on strings, sub-procs, pretty much all blocks, etc.
You can’t treat “statements” in ruby as each line of a block. #to_ruby
is probably not what you want.

Unfortunately I think that’s true. What I need to do basically (I
think) is just rewrite the stuff that generates the code.


Giles B.

Podcast: http://hollywoodgrit.blogspot.com
Blog: http://gilesbowkett.blogspot.com
Portfolio: http://www.gilesgoatboy.org
Tumblelog: http://giles.tumblr.com

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