Free pdf ebook


#1

Hello everybody,

i start to learn Ruby . i NEED

“sams teach yourself RUBY in 21 days” book.

can you give me any link to get it by downloading pdf format.

thank you


#2

hazal wrote:

Hello everybody,

i start to learn Ruby . i NEED

“sams teach yourself RUBY in 21 days” book.

can you give me any link to get it by downloading pdf format.

thank you

http://www.ebookmall.com/ebooks/sams-teach-yourself-ruby-in-21-days-slagell-ebooks.htm

Not free, though, and found after a quick Google query.


Phillip “CynicalRyan” Gawlowski

Rule of Open-Source Programming #48:

The number of items on a project’s to-do list always grows or remains
constant.


#3

Umm. No.
No.
And may I repeat no.
Someone wrote that and decided not to release it for free. That’s a
valid choice, and should be respected and supported. Your lack of
will, or funds, to get the legal version of the book don’t matter.

Now all that aside, you can learn ruby very nicely from the pragmatic
programmers guide (available legally, for free, online), and the
poignent guide to ruby (also available, legally, for free).

Use google. It’s your friend. It will find those guides for you, and
also find plenty of good examples.

And don’t ask people to participate in theft like that.

–Kyle


#4

On 3/22/07, hazal removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Hello everybody,

i start to learn Ruby . i NEED

“sams teach yourself RUBY in 21 days” book.

can you give me any link to get it by downloading pdf format.

  1. this book is not available under a legitimate free download
  2. this book is dated, and other books would make a better purchase.

#5
  • Kyle S., 22.03.2007 16:56:

And don’t ask people to participate in theft like that.

I’d suggest not to use the term “theft” in this context because for
example in Germany to commit a theft (“Diebstahl”) you need to take
away something physical (and movable) from someone else. This does
not mean that in Germany it is no crime to download the book but only
means that downloading it is a different kind of crime. I’d suggest
simply writing it “unethical and illegal acts like that”.

Besides this I would suggest printed works because the have an
indisputable advantage compared to PDFs: You can read them without
displaying them on a computer. This means

a) You can read them where using a computer (not even a laptop) is
not a good idea.
b) You can have the book on your desktop and not covering valuable
room on you screen.

Suggestions for books:

  • “Programming Ruby” von Dave T. et al.

  • “Ruby Cookbook” by Carlson & Richardson

If you are into Rails perhaps also

  • “Agile Web D. with Rails” by Hansson

Josef ‘Jupp’ Schugt


#6

Really? What type of crime is it. Completely off topic, but it’s
interesting.


#7

Kyle S. wrote:

Really? What type of crime is it. Completely off topic, but it’s
interesting.

Actually, it’s theft, too, just not in the shoplifting-sense.

The German term would be “Urheberrechtsverletzung” (copyright
infringement): unlicensed, and not explicitly exempt by law (§ 53 UrhG),
copying and distribution of a copyrighted work, and / or usage of such a
work.

This is covered in § 106 UrhG (Urheberrechtsgesetz: Copyright law).

Disclaimer: IANAL.


Phillip “CynicalRyan” Gawlowski

Rule of Open-Source Programming #15:

If you like it, let the author know. If you hate it, let the author
know why.


#8

On 3/22/07, Kyle S. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Really? What type of crime is it. Completely off topic, but it’s
interesting.

The same kind of crime it is in the United States I imagine, civil
copyright
infringement. This is getting way OT, but google for essays by Lawrence
Lessig for a lot more information on the differences between theft and
copyright infringement.


#9

I found the Poignant Guide difficult to read. I used to be a programmer
many moons ago, but only recently have tried to get back into the swing
of things. I am used to reading technical manuals. The way of
describing things in the Poignant Guide tended to confuse me, rather
than help.

But, I have enjoyed learning Ruby with the Pragmatic Programmer book, as
well as the on-line tutorials.

-w


#10

Tanner B. wrote:

copyright infringement.
No, it can land you in a criminal court, additional to the civil branch
of the justice system.

(Yes, our RIAA and MPAA equivalents have gone crazy, too)


Phillip “CynicalRyan” Gawlowski

Rule of Open-Source Programming #15:

If you like it, let the author know. If you hate it, let the author
know why.


#11

On Fri, Mar 23, 2007 at 02:09:26AM +0900, Phillip G. wrote:

Lessig for a lot more information on the differences between theft and
copyright infringement.

No, it can land you in a criminal court, additional to the civil branch
of the justice system.

(Yes, our RIAA and MPAA equivalents have gone crazy, too)

In the US, you can end up in criminal court for activities related to
infringement, but not for the infringement itself. The terms of the
DMCA, for instance, can land you in criminal court for certain types of
circumvention of so-called “security” measures that were deemed at the
time (by a bunch of technically deficient legislators) to be indivisible
from copyright infringement.

It’s getting pretty thick on Capitol Hill.


#12

On Fri, Mar 23, 2007 at 02:07:59AM +0900, Phillip G. wrote:

Kyle S. wrote:

Really? What type of crime is it. Completely off topic, but it’s
interesting.

Actually, it’s theft, too, just not in the shoplifting-sense.

The fact that it’s illegal does not make it “theft”.


#13

OK guys, stop jumping down my throat for using the common term for
something.

Legally is it theft? Maybe not, but commonly it is referred to as such.

He did ask for something illicit, knowing full well it was illegal.
Why was the use of one word in a response diverting all focus from the
original intent of the post?

–Kyle


#14

Chad P. wrote:

On Fri, Mar 23, 2007 at 02:07:59AM +0900, Phillip G. wrote:

Kyle S. wrote:

Really? What type of crime is it. Completely off topic, but it’s
interesting.
Actually, it’s theft, too, just not in the shoplifting-sense.

The fact that it’s illegal does not make it “theft”.

The law handles it similar to a theft, over here. And it is a kind of
theft in any case (loss of revenue, for example, and I know stuff like
that doesn’t translate into automatic loss of revenue!).

Still, I placed the IANAL, disclaimer, and I’m expressing difficult
stuff in layman’s terms, from a layman’s perspective to boot.


Phillip “CynicalRyan” Gawlowski

Rule of Open-Source Programming #20:

Open Code != Good Code


#15

Kyle S. wrote:

OK guys, stop jumping down my throat for using the common term for
something.

Legally is it theft? Maybe not, but commonly it is referred to as such.

He did ask for something illicit, knowing full well it was illegal.
Why was the use of one word in a response diverting all focus from the
original intent of the post?

Because programmers thrive on exact language, and exact meanings of
terms, maybe? ESR has written some interesting stuff about that.


Phillip “CynicalRyan” Gawlowski

Rule of Open-Source Programming #7:

Release early, release often. Clean compilation is optional.


#16

On Fri, Mar 23, 2007 at 01:40:35AM +0900, Josef ‘Jupp’ Schugt wrote:

  • Kyle S., 22.03.2007 16:56:

And don’t ask people to participate in theft like that.

I’d suggest not to use the term “theft” in this context because for
example in Germany to commit a theft (“Diebstahl”) you need to take
away something physical (and movable) from someone else. This does
not mean that in Germany it is no crime to download the book but only
means that downloading it is a different kind of crime. I’d suggest
simply writing it “unethical and illegal acts like that”.

It’s not “theft” in the United States, either. It’s “copyright
infringement”. The law recognizes a distinct difference between “theft”
(depriving someone of something by taking it) and “infringement”
(violating a legally granted monopolistic privilege).

The book isn’t closed on the subject of copyright infringement being
ethical, either. Let’s just stick with calling it “infringement” or an
“illegal” act, and avoid the controversy – unless you really want to
hear my views on a logically consistent system of ethics derived from
first principles as it relates to the concept of “intellectual
property”.


#17

Chad W. wrote:

I found the Poignant Guide difficult to read. I used to be a programmer
many moons ago, but only recently have tried to get back into the swing
of things. I am used to reading technical manuals. The way of
describing things in the Poignant Guide tended to confuse me, rather
than help.

I found that I could understand _why’s peculiar stile after I already
had somewhat adjusted to the Ruby culture in general.

The nice thing is, that there are many tutorials out there, that even I
can understand. Something, I found distinctly lacking in the so-called
enterprise-level languages like C/++ or Java.

But, I have enjoyed learning Ruby with the Pragmatic Programmer book, as
well as the on-line tutorials.

And the Pickaxe is a very good reference, too. I tend to look into it
first, before consulting *ri.


Phillip “CynicalRyan” Gawlowski

Rule of Open-Source Programming #20:

Open Code != Good Code


#18

Kyle S. wrote:

OK guys, stop jumping down my throat for using the common term for
something.

Legally is it theft? Maybe not, but commonly it is referred to as such.
Do we let people get away with mixing up Ruby with Rails? Static with
strict typing? Relational databases with SQL? Just because a mistake
is commonly made doesn’t make it any less a mistake.

He did ask for something illicit, knowing full well it was illegal.
Why was the use of one word in a response diverting all focus from the
original intent of the post?
My take is that the disapproval was taken as read, and didn’t need any
further embellishment. Besides, the nuances of international copyright
law are far more interesting than a crude breach of community etiquette
:slight_smile:


#19

On 3/22/07, Phillip G. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

terms, maybe? ESR has written some interesting stuff about that.
Nah. It’s a bikeshed to the nuclear power plant of intellectual
property discussions in general.

-austin


#20

The first edition of Programming Ruby is available free, extremely
good, very popular, and easy to find. The Sams book isn’t free, is
obviously hard to find, and very probably sucks. Stealing Sams when
you can get Programming Ruby for free is like holding up a liquor
store when you already have a great job.