Filesystem Database

I’d like to use a database, but my IT department won’t install mysql. I
know perl has a db interface that is stored on the filesystem. Is FSDB
the equivalent for Ruby? Is that what people recommend using for db’s
stored on a filesystem?

Thanks!

On Aug 17, 2007, at 17:04 , Yottameter wrote:

I’d like to use a database, but my IT department won’t install
mysql. I know perl has a db interface that is stored on the
filesystem. Is FSDB the equivalent for Ruby? Is that what people
recommend using for db’s stored on a filesystem?

http://www.sqlite.org/ might do what you want.

~Wayne

s///g
Wayne E. Seguin
Sr. Systems Architect & Systems Administrator

On Aug 17, 2007, at 4:28 PM, Wayne E. Seguin wrote:

s///g
Wayne E. Seguin
Sr. Systems Architect & Systems Administrator

What a crappy IT department!
They won’t let you use what you need?
You’re a Sr.Systesms Architect & Sys Admin!

They won’t install it on the server? or they just don’t want to
install and support something?

What to use depends on what you want to do. (and in this case, what
you can do…)

On Aug 17, 2007, at 17:55 , John J. wrote:

~Wayne
install and support something?

What to use depends on what you want to do. (and in this case, what
you can do…)

Careful John, I was merely replying to the OP. I cannot speak for his
IT department and yes that is my title.

~Wayne

s///g
Wayne E. Seguin
Sr. Systems Architect & Systems Administrator

The problem is a rogue IT person did give me sudo, but then our machines
are replaced, and all the work goes away. They don’t want to install and
support anything. If it’s not in my filesystem, it essentially doesn’t
exist over tim because the machines are replaced.

My linux system at home is more decked out than my work.

Yottameter wrote:

The problem is a rogue IT person did give me sudo, but then our machines
are replaced, and all the work goes away. They don’t want to install and
support anything. If it’s not in my filesystem, it essentially doesn’t
exist over tim because the machines are replaced.

My linux system at home is more decked out than my work.

If the DB is for just you or a small number of people, use sqlite, if
it’s for a something larger, install PostgreSQL from source into your
home directory.

Careful John, I was merely replying to the OP. I cannot speak for
his IT department and yes that is my title.

~Wayne

Oops! My client didn’t properly nest the quote levels! Sorry for the
noise.

property law, etc.?

In that case, you really should talk to your supervisor about
what you are trying to accomplish and whether there is a
better way than either MySQL or a “filesystem database”
accessed via Ruby.

I couldn’t agree more with that. A reluctance on part of the IT
department
should have you talk to your supervisor and IT about what your needs
are,
why those needs exist and how those needs can be fulfilled within the
corporate policy framework - and never in trying to find a workaround
solution you implement yourself. That will be unsupported, may have
unknown
side effects - SQLlite probably won’t, but in principle, you do not
exist in
a vacuum if you’re on a corporate network - and possibly violate a
policy,
resulting in very negative personal consequences for you, ranging from
“being on IT’s hitlist” to termination.

They sign your paycheck, they make the rules - no matter how much you
may
disagree with the rules.

Felix

Yottameter wrote:

I’d like to use a database, but my IT department won’t install mysql. I
know perl has a db interface that is stored on the filesystem. Is FSDB
the equivalent for Ruby? Is that what people recommend using for db’s
stored on a filesystem?

Thanks!

Unfortunately, FSDB doesn’t have a standard db interface. It’s more of a
persistence mechanism than a full database with queries and so on. It
can be useful, but it’s not a replacement for mysql.

Have you looked at sqlite?

There is also kirbybase, though I don’t know what it’s interface looks
like.

Can you build mysql in your home dir?

Yottameter wrote:

I’d like to use a database, but my IT department won’t install mysql. I
know perl has a db interface that is stored on the filesystem. Is FSDB
the equivalent for Ruby? Is that what people recommend using for db’s
stored on a filesystem?

Thanks!

I’ve seen a number of responses here, some helpful and some rather
snotty. But nobody has asked you the obvious questions. So I will:

  1. Are you talking about a workstation or server?
  2. If a workstation, is it Windows?
  3. Is the IT reluctance to install MySQL part of an overall corporate
    policy designed to protect you and your colleagues from some things that
    are really nasty, like trojans, social engineering, releasing private
    personal data, intellectual property law, etc.?

I work in a corporate environment, so I’m going to adopt the following
assumptions:

  1. Workstation.
  2. Windows.
  3. Yes, it’s a protective corporate policy.

In that case, you really should talk to your supervisor about what you
are trying to accomplish and whether there is a better way than either
MySQL or a “filesystem database” accessed via Ruby.

That said, I believe SQLite is a good way to do things. KirbyBase is
also popular, but I have no experience with it. For “smallish” problems,
I rather like Microsoft Access. It has a very user-friendly design
interface and it can (via ODBC) talk to just about any RDBMS. The only
problems I’ve ever had with it are:

  1. It gets very nasty when the “.mdb” file hits the 2 GB size limit.
  2. It doesn’t really play well with file names containing more than one
    “.”.

On Sat, 18 Aug 2007, Felix W. wrote:

property law, etc.?
why those needs exist and how those needs can be fulfilled within the
corporate policy framework - and never in trying to find a workaround
solution you implement yourself. That will be unsupported, may have unknown
side effects - SQLlite probably won’t, but in principle, you do not exist in
a vacuum if you’re on a corporate network - and possibly violate a policy,
resulting in very negative personal consequences for you, ranging from
“being on IT’s hitlist” to termination.

They sign your paycheck, they make the rules - no matter how much you may
disagree with the rules.

Might be. But then again, you have a profession. You have a profile. And
you did not only fetch the job to get money for whatever they ask you to
do but you also give them your time and they also owe to you to follow
up
on the promise to let you do your job.

What I’m up to: it might well be that starting to talk with higher up on
the ladder might get you a non-engineer job later but it can also be
that
it won’t change one thing except that you waste your time arguing about
things upper management doesn’t care about at all but still expects you
to
do your job and will hold you accountable if you don’t succeed
“implementing a proper database without being allowed to use a
database”.

So a guerillia action under the radar - you know the way how linux
became
so popular - might be the only way to actually get things done instead
of
wasting everyones time.

There’s no law of nature that causes things to be the way they are for
some rational reason nor is there a rule that commands that rationally
arguing about things will necessarily change things to the better.

Your proposed way can (and should) be the right one though,
*t