Exporting to Excel ( all versions )

Hello,

Thanks in advance for reading.

I’m attempting to export data to an excel spreadsheet, and have done so
successfully using RubySpreadsheet (
http://sourceforge.net/projects/rubyspreadsheet/ ) which is a port of
the Perl WriteExcel module…

Many of the methods however were left out, one of them being
“insert_bitmap” and unfortunatley the bitmap is an important part of the
export.

Does anyone know how this can be done, and/or is anyone adventurous
enough to help me update the RubySpreadsheet so it can accept images?
Thanks in advance

sw0rdfish

No One has any possible solutions to this problem?

Any ideas or links would be appritiated, I’m totally out of ideas.

sw0rdfish-2 wrote:

Many of the methods however were left out, one of them being
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Wow, the package has hand-coded OLE file formats. I bet it’s a lot
faster than using OLE automation on a Win32 platform.

If performance is not a concern you could use some OLE automation
controller for Ruby. I know it exists… If not, you could always
shell out to Perl or whatever.

If you’re on a *nix platform I believe there are Ruby tools for
controlling OpenOffice – you could generate an OpenOffice spreadsheet
and then export that to .xls

If there weren’t a successful perl module I’d save as much of the .xls
as you’ve generated, copy it, and insert the image using Excel, then
save that. Do a bindiff, and that should give a starting point for
coding the routine.

Since there is a successful Perl module, I’d do one of the following:

  1. Shell out to Perl
  2. Set up a web service that runs the Perl routines
  3. Find the Perl routine that inserts the image, translate it to Ruby,
    and add it to the rubyspreadsheet code ( maybe in conjunction with the
    bindiff for analysis, above )

But you’ve probably already though of all that…

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