Error when running script


#1

This is the script, it’s intent is to read all Error logs.txt files in a
directory or just the text files that are listed. Find all the lines
that contain the word “error” and all the lines that contain the word
“warning” display a count of each word. Additionally it should create
report that tells how many times the two words appear every ten min, for
the duration of the error logs.

my_path = “D:\My Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt”

warning = 0
error = 0

d = Dir.new(my_path)
d.each do |fl|
unless fl == ‘.’ or fl == ‘…’ then
puts my_path + fl
File.open(my_path + fl, “r”).each do |line|
if line =~ /error/ then
error += 1
elsif line =~ /warning/ then
warning += 1
end
end

end
end
puts warning.to_s
puts error.to_s

Here is the errors I receive when I run it.

Not a directory - D:\My Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt
D:/My Documents/Replicon/ErrorCount.rb:6:in `initialize’
Press ENTER to close the window…

Directory Path
D:\My Documents\Replicon
I was going to add an attachment to show that the directory really exits
and that the file is in that directory, but it was to large.

If anyone has any ideas as to why it is not working I be very grateful,
as I am new to ruby code in general.


#2

Brad W. wrote:

error = 0
end
Not a directory - D:\My Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt
D:/My Documents/Replicon/ErrorCount.rb:6:in `initialize’
Press ENTER to close the window…

Directory Path
D:\My Documents\Replicon
I was going to add an attachment to show that the directory really exits
and that the file is in that directory, but it was to large.

If anyone has any ideas as to why it is not working I be very grateful,
as I am new to ruby code in general.

Look at the error message. You’re asking Dir.new to open the directory
“D:\My Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt”.
I think the directory name is actually “D:\My Documents\Replicon” and
“log_file_20090221_041817.txt” is a file within that directory.


#3

Brad W. wrote:

error = 0
end
Not a directory - D:\My
Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt\ D:/My
Documents/Replicon/ErrorCount.rb:6:in `initialize’ Press ENTER to
close the window…

Looks like you tried to open a file as a directory:

D:\My Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt

The path looks to be:

D:\My Documents\Replicon\

And the file in that path:

log_file_20090221_041817.txt


#4

Tim H. wrote:

Brad W. wrote:

error = 0
end
Not a directory - D:\My Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt
D:/My Documents/Replicon/ErrorCount.rb:6:in `initialize’
Press ENTER to close the window…

Directory Path
D:\My Documents\Replicon
I was going to add an attachment to show that the directory really exits
and that the file is in that directory, but it was to large.

If anyone has any ideas as to why it is not working I be very grateful,
as I am new to ruby code in general.

Look at the error message. You’re asking Dir.new to open the directory
“D:\My Documents\Replicon\log_file_20090221_041817.txt”.
I think the directory name is actually “D:\My Documents\Replicon” and
“log_file_20090221_041817.txt” is a file within that directory.

Thank you that did help, but I still have a problem.

my_path = “C:\Ruby\Text\”

warning = 0
error = 0

d = Dir.new(my_path)
d.each do |fl|
unless fl == ‘.’ or fl == ‘…’ then
puts my_path + fl
File.open(my_path + fl, “r”).each do |line|
if line =~ /error/ then
error += 1
elsif line =~ /warning/ then
warning += 1
end
end

end
end
puts warning.to_s
puts error.to_s

The problem that I have now is that it apparently sees the file but does
not read it.

Below is the response that is returned.

C:\Ruby\Text\log_file_20090221_041817.txt
0
0
Press ENTER to close the window…


#5

Brad W. wrote:

D:\My Documents\Replicon

puts my_path + fl
puts warning.to_s
Press ENTER to close the window…

That code should work. Are you sure that the text file’s content
actually match “error” or “warning”? Did you check the letter case?
Perhaps try and put a “puts line” right after the open and see what it
outputs. It looks to be reading the files anyway, otherwise you’d see
an error, rather than just the initial variable’s value of 0.


#6

Brad W. wrote:

I was going to add an attachment to show that the directory really exits

if line =~ /error/ then

The problem that I have now is that it apparently sees the file but does
not read it.

Below is the response that is returned.

C:\Ruby\Text\log_file_20090221_041817.txt
0
0
Press ENTER to close the window…

Without seeing your file I can’t offer any specific advice. If it was me
I’d add a “puts line” as the first statement in the block, just to make
sure that the value of line is what I expect it to be.


#7

Tim G. wrote:

Brad W. wrote:

D:\My Documents\Replicon

puts my_path + fl
puts warning.to_s
Press ENTER to close the window…

That code should work. Are you sure that the text file’s content
actually match “error” or “warning”? Did you check the letter case?
Perhaps try and put a “puts line” right after the open and see what it
outputs. It looks to be reading the files anyway, otherwise you’d see
an error, rather than just the initial variable’s value of 0.

I did check the case and it was wrong. I changed it to match and it made
a difference. I still don’t think its working correctly. If your curious
I have attached the text file that it is reading.

my_path = “C:\Ruby\Text\”

WARNING = 0
ERROR = 0

d = Dir.new(my_path)

d.each do |fl|
unless fl == ‘.’ or fl == ‘…’ then
puts my_path + fl
File.open(my_path + fl, “r”).each do |line|
if line =~ /ERROR/ then
error += 1
elsif line =~ /WARNING/ then
warning += 1
end
end

end
end
puts warning.to_s
puts error.to_s


#8

Brad W. wrote:

I did check the case and it was wrong. I changed it to match and it made
a difference. I still don’t think its working correctly. If your curious
I have attached the text file that it is reading.

my_path = “C:\Ruby\Text\”

Paths are much easier to manage using / , even on Windows.

WARNING = 0
ERROR = 0

These are not the same as warning and error. And this…

warnings = 0
errors = 0

…provides better “ear” - better hints that we are counting things.

d = Dir.new(my_path)

d.each do |fl|
unless fl == ‘.’ or fl == ‘…’ then

Only use unless in a pinch. This is better style:

 if fl != '.' and fl != '..'

puts my_path + fl
File.open(my_path + fl, “r”).each do |line|

Try File.readlines(my_path + fl).each do |line|

if line =~ /ERROR/ then
  error += 1

You don’t need ‘then’. It’s allowed, but it makes the code more verbose.

elsif line =~ /WARNING/ then
   warning += 1
end

end

end
end
puts warning.to_s
puts error.to_s

puts implies .to_s. Try:

puts “Warnings: #{warnings}; Errors: #{errors}”

Now, would this work?

warnings = File.readlines(my_path + fl).grep(/WARNING/).length

You would be amazed what Ruby can pack into one statement!


#9

Phlip wrote:

Brad W. wrote:

I did check the case and it was wrong. I changed it to match and it made
a difference. I still don’t think its working correctly. If your curious
I have attached the text file that it is reading.

my_path = “C:\Ruby\Text\”

Paths are much easier to manage using / , even on Windows.

WARNING = 0
ERROR = 0

These are not the same as warning and error. And this…

warnings = 0
errors = 0

…provides better “ear” - better hints that we are counting things.

d = Dir.new(my_path)

d.each do |fl|
unless fl == ‘.’ or fl == ‘…’ then

Only use unless in a pinch. This is better style:

 if fl != '.' and fl != '..'

puts my_path + fl
File.open(my_path + fl, “r”).each do |line|

Try File.readlines(my_path + fl).each do |line|

if line =~ /ERROR/ then
  error += 1

You don’t need ‘then’. It’s allowed, but it makes the code more verbose.

elsif line =~ /WARNING/ then
   warning += 1
end

end

end
end
puts warning.to_s
puts error.to_s

puts implies .to_s. Try:

puts “Warnings: #{warnings}; Errors: #{errors}”

Now, would this work?

warnings = File.readlines(my_path + fl).grep(/WARNING/).length

You would be amazed what Ruby can pack into one statement!

I am feeling a bit stupid at this point parts of what you have said seem
to make sense but other parts don’t. I don’t to keep bothering you but I
really want to understand what is happening and I am not sure what you
are telling me to replace. You mention warnings allot but not error. I
have replaced what I believe you were saying. whatever you have been a
tremendous help and I hope one gay I can return the favor, but all this
is new stuff to me. I have read allot and it has not helped so far that
is why I have turned to forums like this because I can actually interact
with real people. Below is the code I changed to what I thought you were
telling me.

my_path = “C:/Ruby/Text/”

warnings = 0
errors = 0

d = Dir.new(my_path)

if fl != ‘.’ and fl != ‘…’

File.readlines(my_path + fl).each do |line|

if line =~ /ERROR/
  error += 1
elsif line =~ /WARNING/
   warning += 1
end

end

end
end

puts implies .to_s. Try:

puts “Warnings: #{warnings}; Errors: #{errors}”

warnings = File.readlines(my_path + fl).grep(/WARNING/).length

puts error.to_s


#10

On Mon, Mar 2, 2009 at 8:53 AM, Phlip removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Brad W. wrote:

d.each do |fl|
unless fl == ‘.’ or fl == ‘…’ then

Only use unless in a pinch. This is better style:
if fl != ‘.’ and fl != ‘…’

I usually agree with anything Phlip says, but not on this :slight_smile:

I love that ruby has the unless keyword and use it often. IMO the
version with unless above reads just fine and you should go with
whichever reads better for you.

No need to open up a conversation about unless vs. if !, particularly
since it’s happened before [1]. Just wanted Brad to hear an
alternative opinion.

Solidarity,
lasitha

[1] e.g. http://markmail.org/thread/4ywej4tsqhe47b3a