Error after install


#1

I installed Ruby on my RHEL 3 system. I did the following:
./configure
make
make test
make install

No errors in the whole process. Now when I try to run irb in
/usr/local/bin/irb I’m gettin the following error:

$ . /usr/local/bin/irb
-bash: require: command not found
-bash: /usr/local/bin/irb: line 13: syntax error near unexpected token
__FILE__' -bash: /usr/local/bin/irb: line 13: IRB.start(FILE)’

Do I need to set up some $PATH info??? Or links to any shared
libraries??? There was nothing said in the ruby-lang.orb site.

Thanks in advance for you help
Callen.


#2

Now when I try to run irb in
/usr/local/bin/irb I’m gettin the following error:

$ . /usr/local/bin/irb
^
-bash: require: command not found
-bash: /usr/local/bin/irb: line 13: syntax error near unexpected token
__FILE__' -bash: /usr/local/bin/irb: line 13: IRB.start(FILE)’

Instead of:
. /usr/local/bin/irb
do:
/usr/local/bin/irb


#3

unknown wrote:

Now when I try to run irb in
/usr/local/bin/irb I’m gettin the following error:

$ . /usr/local/bin/irb
^
-bash: require: command not found
-bash: /usr/local/bin/irb: line 13: syntax error near unexpected token
__FILE__' -bash: /usr/local/bin/irb: line 13: IRB.start(FILE)’

Instead of:
. /usr/local/bin/irb
do:
/usr/local/bin/irb

when I do that and then run which I get the following.

$ which irb
/opt/third-party/bin/irb

That is why I’m using the . /usr/local/bin/irb command. Am I not using
it correctly.

Thanks for your reply.


#4

Callen Mascarenhas wrote:

Instead of:
. /usr/local/bin/irb
do:
/usr/local/bin/irb

when I do that and then run which I get the following.

$ which irb
/opt/third-party/bin/irb

That is why I’m using the . /usr/local/bin/irb command. Am I not using
it correctly.

No. A dot followed by a filename means “read this file into the shell” -
that is, it is treated as a series of bash commands.

Just doing /usr/local/bin/irb (without the dot) will execute that
command.


#5

Brian C. wrote:

Callen Mascarenhas wrote:

Instead of:
. /usr/local/bin/irb
do:
/usr/local/bin/irb

when I do that and then run which I get the following.

$ which irb
/opt/third-party/bin/irb

That is why I’m using the . /usr/local/bin/irb command. Am I not using
it correctly.

No. A dot followed by a filename means “read this file into the shell” -
that is, it is treated as a series of bash commands.

Just doing /usr/local/bin/irb (without the dot) will execute that
command.

Thanks guys for replying.

The reason I’m using the “. /usr/local/bin/irb” is because I have
another company version of irb/ruby in /opt/third-party/bin/ and they
have removed the ‘gem’ command. So I cannot install new features and
play with Ruby.

And if you look at the commands it is using the wrong irb i.e. the one
in /opt/third-party/bin/ which doesn’t have the gem command and not the
one I just installed. I hope this explains my predicament more clearly.


#6

Callen Mascarenhas wrote:

-bash: /usr/local/bin/irb: line 13: syntax error near unexpected token

$ which irb
/opt/third-party/bin/irb

That is why I’m using the . /usr/local/bin/irb command. Am I not using
it correctly.

Thanks for your reply.

Don’t use the period at the beginning, that is what is screwing it up:

$ . /usr/bin/irb
bash: require: command not found
bash: /usr/bin/irb: line 13: syntax error near unexpected token
__FILE__' bash: /usr/bin/irb: line 13: IRB.start(FILE)’
$ /usr/bin/irb
irb(main):001:0>

-Justin


#7

Hassan S. wrote:

On Tue, Dec 23, 2008 at 9:53 AM, Callen Mascarenhas
removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

The reason I’m using the “. /usr/local/bin/irb” is because I have
another company version of irb/ruby in /opt/third-party/bin/ and they
have removed the ‘gem’ command. So I cannot install new features and
play with Ruby.

You’ve already been told: the ‘.’ is wrong, whether it’s ‘./’ or ‘. /’
– so
don’t use it.

Entering /usr/local/bin/irb will use that exact version, and no, it
won’t
change the result of which irb – irrelevant.

If you want to use your personal version all the time, change the PATH
defined in .bashrc (or wherever) to put /usr/local/bin first, or at
least
before /opt/third-party/bin.

HTH,

I guess I didn’t really understand how the ‘which’ command worked.
Thanks for making things clear for me.

So out of curiosity, how come ‘which’ is pulling up the irb in
/opt/third-party/bin?? Is it because that is the first one in PATH ???
I know this is a Unix question. But if someone can help, I can only be
grateful :).


#8

Callen Mascarenhas wrote:

So out of curiosity, how come ‘which’ is pulling up the irb in
/opt/third-party/bin?? Is it because that is the first one in PATH ???
I know this is a Unix question. But if someone can help, I can only be
grateful :).

At a command line type “man which”. It’ll explain to you exactly how the
which command works.


#9

On Tue, Dec 23, 2008 at 11:11 AM, Callen Mascarenhas
removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

So out of curiosity, how come ‘which’ is pulling up the irb in
/opt/third-party/bin?? Is it because that is the first one in PATH ???

Exactly. Hence my suggestion that, if you want a different version to
be your own default, change your PATH.


#10

On Tue, Dec 23, 2008 at 9:53 AM, Callen Mascarenhas
removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

The reason I’m using the “. /usr/local/bin/irb” is because I have
another company version of irb/ruby in /opt/third-party/bin/ and they
have removed the ‘gem’ command. So I cannot install new features and
play with Ruby.

You’ve already been told: the ‘.’ is wrong, whether it’s ‘./’ or ‘. /’
– so
don’t use it.

Entering /usr/local/bin/irb will use that exact version, and no, it
won’t
change the result of which irb – irrelevant.

If you want to use your personal version all the time, change the PATH
defined in .bashrc (or wherever) to put /usr/local/bin first, or at
least
before /opt/third-party/bin.

HTH,


#11

Hassan S. wrote:

On Tue, Dec 23, 2008 at 11:11 AM, Callen Mascarenhas
removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

So out of curiosity, how come ‘which’ is pulling up the irb in
/opt/third-party/bin?? Is it because that is the first one in PATH ???

Exactly. Hence my suggestion that, if you want a different version to
be your own default, change your PATH.

Thanks guys for all your help. I’ll be back with more questions soon.
But I’m good for now. Go Ruby!!!