Erlang book is in beta


#1

I love Ruby–I’ve done all my serious (and most of my not-so-serious)
work in Ruby since 2000.

But that doesn’t mean that I think it’s the only solution–the
universal language. There are always going to be areas where other
tools excel.

One of those areas is concurrent programming. As the world moves to
multi-core processors, and as we start to write applications
distributed across intra- and internets, we need to find better ways
to exploit all this extra power. If you’ve ever tried to write
concurrent programs in Java, or even Ruby, you know the challenges.

Erlang is designed from the ground up to help programmers create
highly concurrently (read thousands or processes), highly reliable
(read 99.99999% uptime) applications. It’s a real world language–it
is used to write telephone switches, banking applications, trading
systems…you name it.

I like it for that reason. I also like it because it’s different–
very different. It makes me think about problems in a totally
different way.

We were lucky to get Joe Armstrong, one of the inventors of Erlang,
to write our latest beta book, Programming Erlang.

The book isn’t being officially announced until next week, but I
thought the Ruby community might appreciate an early look.

  http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/jaerlang/

Cheers

Dave


#2

Dave T. wrote:

Java, or even Ruby, you know the challenges.
We were lucky to get Joe Armstrong, one of the inventors of Erlang, to
write our latest beta book, Programming Erlang.

Sweet. Any plans for a Haskell book?


James B.

“The truth often suffers more by the heat of its defenders
than by the arguments of its opponents.”

  • William Penn.

#3

Sweet. Any plans for a Haskell book?

+1


#4

On Mar 2, 2007, at 2:00 PM, James B. wrote:

Sweet. Any plans for a Haskell book?

I’d love to do one.

It’s a question of finding the right author.


#5

On 2-Mar-07, at 2:18 PM, Dave T. wrote:

We were lucky to get Joe Armstrong, one of the inventors of Erlang,
to write our latest beta book, Programming Erlang.

Oh this is very cool!


Bob H. – blogs at <http://www.recursive.ca/
hutch/>
Recursive Design Inc. – http://www.recursive.ca/
Raconteur – http://www.raconteur.info/
xampl for Ruby – http://rubyforge.org/projects/xampl/


#6

On 3/2/07, Dave T. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

On Mar 2, 2007, at 2:00 PM, James B. wrote:

Sweet. Any plans for a Haskell book?

And any plans for an IO book? It also has interesting answers/solutions
relevant to the current uni- to multi-core transition… iolanguage.com

/Robert F.


#7

On 3/2/07, Robert F. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

relevant to the current uni- to multi-core transition… iolanguage.com

/Robert F.

I’d say it would be a bit soon for an Io book since I still pull down
daily changes from the main darcs repository. :wink: Having said that, I
highly recommend that people check it out… it really brings the
meaning of completely dynamic into scope.

Though I’ve gone through other Haskell books, it would be great to see
how the Pragmatics would present the language. So +1 on that from me
as well.

Brian.


#8

On 02/03/07, Dave T. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

to exploit all this extra power. If you’ve ever tried to write
different way.

Cheers

Dave

Awesome. I’ve been meaning to learn Erlang for a while now. I’m
definitely buying this, especially with Joe Armstrong involved.

Farrel


#9

On 3/3/07, Bob H. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

On 2-Mar-07, at 2:18 PM, Dave T. wrote:

We were lucky to get Joe Armstrong, one of the inventors of Erlang,
to write our latest beta book, Programming Erlang.

Oh this is very cool!

Awesome.


#10

Excellent! It just so happens I am gearing up to learn Erlang. What
timing! Maybe people on this list really are clairvoyant…

Hans


#11

On 3/3/07, Brian M. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

On 3/2/07, Robert F. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

And any plans for an IO book? It also has interesting answers/solutions
relevant to the current uni- to multi-core transition… iolanguage.com

I’d say it would be a bit soon for an Io book since I still pull down
daily changes from the main darcs repository. :wink:

Yes, but it’s a bright new world, with the publishing world looking more
and
more like the open-source software world, with versioning, beta books
and
frequent releases… :wink:

/Robert


#12

to exploit all this extra power. If you’ve ever tried to write

We were lucky to get Joe Armstrong, one of the inventors of Erlang, to
write our latest beta book, Programming Erlang.

The book isn’t being officially announced until next week, but I
thought the Ruby community might appreciate an early look.

 http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/jaerlang/

my +1 also - I’ve worked through the Erlang tutorials but haven’t
quite grasped it properly - so thanks for the timely ‘release’

Kev


#13

On Mar 2, 2007, at 6:56 PM, Robert F. wrote:

more and
more like the open-source software world, with versioning, beta
books and
frequent releases… :wink:

I’d love to see proposals on IO, Haskell, and OCaml.

Dave


#14

Dave T. wrote:

to exploit all this extra power. If you’ve ever tried to write

Cheers

Dave

Thank you!! This is exactly what I’ve been waiting for!!


M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC§
http://borasky-research.blogspot.com/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.


#15

Dave T. wrote:

Well … try announcing a Ruby book on the Erlang list first. :slight_smile:


M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC§
http://borasky-research.blogspot.com/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.


#16

On any other language list, if I announced a book on a different
language, I’d get flamed until crisp.

Here, all you folks say is “cool”.

It’s a nice place to call home.

Dave


#17

On Sat, Mar 03, 2007 at 03:29:18PM +0900, Dave T. wrote:

On any other language list, if I announced a book on a different
language, I’d get flamed until crisp.

You should do one on VBScript. I’d like to see what that reaction
would be like. For my own purposes.

_why


#18

On 3/3/07, _why removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

On Sat, Mar 03, 2007 at 03:29:18PM +0900, Dave T. wrote:

On any other language list, if I announced a book on a different
language, I’d get flamed until crisp.

You should do one on VBScript. I’d like to see what that reaction
would be like. For my own purposes.
Do not fear on this list nobody knows what VBScript is.

And just in case, for those who do not know me ;). It’s a joke.

Robert


#19

On 3/2/07, Dave T. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

I agree that the Ruby community rocks, but a big reason for the warm
response is because of the reputation you guys have created for
yourselves. Your flagship book has Java examples throughout and we
all love it. You’ll always have the benefit of the doubt.

Pat


#20

On Sat, Mar 03, 2007 at 03:27:21PM +0900, Dave T. wrote:

Yes, but it’s a bright new world, with the publishing world looking
more and
more like the open-source software world, with versioning, beta
books and
frequent releases… :wink:

I’d love to see proposals on IO, Haskell, and OCaml.

. . . especially if the OCaml book comes with an OCaml compiler that is
released under a BSD-like license.