Enterprise Rails Apps


#1

Is there a place I can get a list of “enterprise” Rails applications?
Apparently, even though I’ve looked at the wiki and cited the examples
there, there are some at my organization who still can’t find proof that
Rails is usable in an enterprise setting.

Would you fine folks be able to tell me about some large-scale projects
that could be classified as “enterprise” projects? People here don’t
care about number of hits, they care about complexity. Something along
the scale of administrative systems for a university.

They’re reading blogs by Java folks who are doing their best to say that
Rails can’t cut it in the enterprise arena (Ted Neward).

Brian H.
Web D.
Learning & Technology Services
Schofield 3-B
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
715 836 3585
removed_email_address@domain.invalid


#2

On Wed, 2006-01-11 at 16:13 -0600, Hogan, Brian P. wrote:

They’re reading blogs by Java folks who are doing their best to say
that Rails can’t cut it in the enterprise arena (Ted Neward).

One of our consulting clients (100 person company) has a Rails
application that powers their production facility (manages huge
printers, order & job tracking, etc). Daily, they process approx 4-10
thousand orders and Rails powers everything in the production side…
all the way to the shipping department and out the door the products go.

It was pretty neat to see people scanning bar codes on products into a
Rails application. :slight_smile:

We’re working on a case study with them and hope to have some
information to share in the near future.

Cheers,

-Robby


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#3

On Jan 11, 2006, at 2:37 PM, Robby R. wrote:

Something along the scale of administrative systems for a university.
products go.

It was pretty neat to see people scanning bar codes on products into a
Rails application. :slight_smile:

We’re working on a case study with them and hope to have some
information to share in the near future.

Cheers,

-Robby

The Yakima Herald Newspaper that I work for has their entire web

presence and intranet running on rails and ruby. I recently recreated
an aging point of sale and circulation issue tracking system on our
intranet that runs on rails. Also our employee review process and
interdepartmental meeting schedule runs on your guessed it, rails.
Also the prepress nightly reporting process and Advertiser Tear
Sheets runs on rails. Plus I have a ton of pure ruby code that
processes text and pushes it around through the different departments

The coolest thing is that I have written all of this stuff by myself

in the last 7 or 8 months including the http://yakimaherald.com
website redesign and backend. That speaks volumes as to the
efficiency and development speed of rails and ruby itself.

Our paper has around 350 employees and serves a 250k population and

our website gets a lot of traffic. I know that the word enterprise is
like loaded dice so take this for what it is. But I would definitely
call our setup here a small enterprise and I have yet to even come
close to hitting any limitations and I think that rails can scale
way further then I am pushing it here right now.

Also the website is not your typical rails app. It runs on 5

different data sources with only two of them inside the building. And
the majority of the data is integrated without ActiveRecord at all.

Cheers-
-Ezra Z.
Yakima Herald-Republic
WebMaster
http://yakimaherald.com
509-577-7732
removed_email_address@domain.invalid


#4

On Jan 11, 2006, at 3:13 PM, csn wrote:

an aging point of sale and circulation issue tracking system on our

Our paper has around 350 employees and serves a 250k population and
our website gets a lot of traffic. I know that the word enterprise is
like loaded dice so take this for what it is. But I would definitely
call our setup here a small enterprise and I have yet to even come
close to hitting any limitations and I think that rails can scale
way further then I am pushing it here right now.

Also the website is not your typical rails app. It runs on 5
different data sources with only two of them inside the building. And
the majority of the data is integrated without ActiveRecord at all.

The web site and intranet apps run on a small cluster. We have a

dual g5 xserv that runs lighttpd/fcgi to serve rails and static
content. the we have a dual xeon debian box for postgresql. And one
more debian box that hosts about 20 client websites and runs more
fcgi listeners for the main site. For what’s going on right now, we
are not even pushing any of this hardware very hard. All three
machines average about 10% cpu usage at any given time.

There is also another xserve for the newsroom database that holds

all the locally written stories and photos in a proprietary Baseview
database that has a super crappy API called LiveIQ script. So my
model that handles that creates a small DSL that converts queries in
ruby using blocks into the liveiq script on the fly. A lot of the
data on the site comes from this db.

We also get a ton of content from the AP newswire. This comes in as

very nasty xml thats base64 encoded. This data gets heavily munged
into the format that gets displayed on the web. We also have an xml-
rpc connection to the Seattle Times(our parent newspaper) to grab
content from then as well.

Then we have our local postgresql db that runs the content

management system on the site. I am working on a new circulation
system that is a large project. It will include publishing the entire
newspaper online in a pdf format so we can sell digital
subscriptions. People that get the actual paper will get the online
version for free. Plus i am building a blog and photo gallery system
that anyone with a digital or physical subscription will get an
account on when they sign up. this will be a blog system like blogger
or something similar in the fact that it will be one application that
runs multiple peoples blogs in a self contained way. And when this
goes live you will be able to click a link on any news item on the
site and get a list of the bloggers in our system that have blogged
about that news article.

We have around 60-70k subscribers right now so right off the bat the

new blog system will need to support that many users and when people
can get a digital subscription to the paper we see the amount of
users growing rapidly. There will be some cool social networking tie
ins between all the bloggers on our system about local events and
meetups and the like.

Since I am the only coder in the whole company, the only reason I

even dream of building this system myself is because I can use rails
to do it. The way rails is organized promotes very good practices if
you use it to its fullest(read tests) that I can take on a project of
this size on my own. I am very productive in rails and I have a
really easy time coming back to code later and being able to
instantly see what I was doing and be able to refactor at will.

Cheers-

-Ezra Z.
Yakima Herald-Republic
WebMaster
http://yakimaherald.com
509-577-7732
removed_email_address@domain.invalid


#5

What’s the hardware behind all that?

csn

Ezra Z. wrote:

The Yakima Herald Newspaper that I work for has their entire web
presence and intranet running on rails and ruby. I recently recreated
an aging point of sale and circulation issue tracking system on our
intranet that runs on rails. Also our employee review process and
interdepartmental meeting schedule runs on your guessed it, rails.
Also the prepress nightly reporting process and Advertiser Tear
Sheets runs on rails. Plus I have a ton of pure ruby code that
processes text and pushes it around through the different departments

The coolest thing is that I have written all of this stuff by myself
in the last 7 or 8 months including the http://yakimaherald.com
website redesign and backend. That speaks volumes as to the
efficiency and development speed of rails and ruby itself.

Our paper has around 350 employees and serves a 250k population and
our website gets a lot of traffic. I know that the word enterprise is
like loaded dice so take this for what it is. But I would definitely
call our setup here a small enterprise and I have yet to even come
close to hitting any limitations and I think that rails can scale
way further then I am pushing it here right now.

Also the website is not your typical rails app. It runs on 5
different data sources with only two of them inside the building. And
the majority of the data is integrated without ActiveRecord at all.

Cheers-
-Ezra Z.
Yakima Herald-Republic
WebMaster
http://yakimaherald.com
509-577-7732
removed_email_address@domain.invalid


#6

Ezra Z. wrote:

The Yakima Herald Newspaper that I work for has …

I would love to see this and other Rails success stories
written up as wiki pages. We could have a whole section
of them!

-r

Technical editing and writing, programming, and web development:
http://www.cfcl.com/rdm/resume.html

Contact information: removed_email_address@domain.invalid, +1 650-873-7841


#7

On Jan 11, 2006, at 5:32 PM, Rich M. wrote:

Ezra Z. wrote:

The Yakima Herald Newspaper that I work for has …

I would love to see this and other Rails success stories
written up as wiki pages. We could have a whole section
of them!

Rich-

I did a fairly extensive write up of the website rebuild here[1] on

my blog. Its a bit outdated now as it doesn’t cover the cluster but
it still has a good look at the dev and deploy process.

Cheers-
-Ezra Z.
WebMaster
Yakima Herald-Republic Newspaper
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
509-577-7732

http://brainspl.at/articles/2005/11/03/from-start-to-launch-http-
yakimaherald-com
OR
http://rubyurl.com/8ko


#8

Enterprise Rails AppsHi Brain

We are writing a clinical research administration workflow system for
Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Cancer Center in Ruby on Rails and XSB
Prolog (ie an enterprise application of comparable complexity). If you
have full control of the database schemas and use Web Services or dRuby
where appropriate, RoR is an excellent framework for dealing with
application complexity. Ruby on Rails keeps the solution to
straightforward problems straightforward and I would argue that Ruby is
superior to Java in making difficult problems more tractable, but you
need very good developers to solve complex, enterprise problems,
whatever language or framework you choose.

Steven Beales
Chief Software Engineer
Medical Decision Logic
724 Dulaney Valley Road
Towson
Maryland
21204
410-828-8948
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
“Hogan, Brian P.” removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote in message
news:removed_email_address@domain.invalid…
Is there a place I can get a list of “enterprise” Rails applications?
Apparently, even though I’ve looked at the wiki and cited the examples
there, there are some at my organization who still can’t find proof that
Rails is usable in an enterprise setting.

Would you fine folks be able to tell me about some large-scale
projects that could be classified as “enterprise” projects? People here
don’t care about number of hits, they care about complexity. Something
along the scale of administrative systems for a university.

They’re reading blogs by Java folks who are doing their best to say
that Rails can’t cut it in the enterprise arena (Ted Neward).

Brian H.
Web D.
Learning & Technology Services
Schofield 3-B
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
715 836 3585
removed_email_address@domain.invalid



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