Do I need self in this method definition


#1

Hello everyone,

I have two hashes. They have the same keys but different or the same
values.
I want to loop through one hash and print out the values in both
hashes for the same key.I add a method to class Hash. I run the script
and it prints out the expected results. I wonder if I have to use
self#method in my implement.
Thanks for all the comments.

Li

class Hash
def self.my_each(hash1={}, hash2={})
hash1.each do |k,v|
if hash2.has_key?(k)
print k,"\t",v,"\t", hash2[k],"\n"
else
print k,"\t",v,"\n"
end
end
end
end

##############main#############
hash1={
‘ATC’=>1,
‘CTA’=>2,
‘CAT’=>10,
‘CCC’=>1
}

hash2={
‘ATC’=>3,
‘CTA’=>2,
‘CAT’=>11
}

Hash.my_each(hash1, hash2)


#2

Li Chen removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

and it prints out the expected results. I wonder if I have to use
self#method in my implement.

class Hash
def self.my_each(hash1={}, hash2={})
end
end

Hash.my_each(hash1, hash2)

You do if you really want a class method - that is, if you want to be
able to call this thing by saying Hash.my_each(hash1, hash2).

The alternative is to make an instance method. Then you could call it by
saying hash1.my_each(hash2). In that case, you would not use “self” in
the def. m.


#3

matt neuburg wrote:

You do if you really want a class method - that is, if you want to be
able to call this thing by saying Hash.my_each(hash1, hash2).

The alternative is to make an instance method. Then you could call it by
saying hash1.my_each(hash2). In that case, you would not use “self” in
the def. m.

Thank you so much. Here is my implement of an instance method. But I
cannot explain very clear why I can #each directly without a receiver.

Li

class Hash
def my_each(hash2={})
each do |k,v|
if hash2.has_key?(k)
print k,"\t",v,"\t", hash2[k],"\n"
else
print k,"\t",v,"\n"
end
end
end

end


#4

Li Chen removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Thank you so much. Here is my implement of an instance method. But I
cannot explain very clear why I can #each directly without a receiver.

Method calls are sent to “self” if they are not sent explicitly to a
receiver. Since this is an instance method, “self” is a Hash instance.

You can say “self.each” in that case if you want to. Most people
don’t; I usually do; it’s a matter of style. However, in some cases
(e.g. the method is private) you can’t say “self” (because “private”
means that an explicit receiver is not allowed). For example, that is
why you can say

print “hello”

but you can’t say

self.print “hello”

It’s because “print” is an instance method of the instance you are in,
but it’s private.

m.