Dir.glob problem

In the program Im making I need to read some wma files into a variable
and I did like this:

songs = Dir.glob(“C:\Users\Public\Music\Sample Music\*.wma”)

Note that this is NOT the wrong directory, I’ve copy pasted it from the
map itself and also the files are wma and nothing else. My programming
teacher has no idea why this dosnt work and the other ppl I’ve talked
with dosnt know either. Most said something like “aside from a simple
mistake like wrong directory/extension, I don’t know what could be going
wrong.” So now this forum is my last resort, why on earth dosnt this
work?!

On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 5:31 PM, David V.
[email protected] wrote:

wrong." So now this forum is my last resort, why on earth dosnt this
work?!

What goes wrong with it?

David V. wrote:

wrong." So now this forum is my last resort, why on earth dosnt this
work?!

The only way I could get it to work is to use the example at
http://ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Dir.html and create a directory
variable such as: lfiles=Files.join(“C:”, “Users”, “Public”, “Music”,
“Sample Music”, “*.wma”) and then use a=Dir.glob(lfiles).
The only problem with that approach is that the entire path is added to
each file. I don’t know if this is a concern or not.

Michael W Ryder wrote:

mistake like wrong directory/extension, I don’t know what could be going
wrong." So now this forum is my last resort, why on earth dosnt this
work?!

The only way I could get it to work is to use the example at
http://ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Dir.html and create a directory
variable such as: lfiles=Files.join(“C:”, “Users”, “Public”, “Music”,
“Sample Music”, “*.wma”) and then use a=Dir.glob(lfiles).
The only problem with that approach is that the entire path is added to
each file. I don’t know if this is a concern or not.

Further experimenting found two other solutions. The first is to use:
a=Dir.glob(“C:/Users/Public/Music/Sample Music/*.wma”) which has the
same “problem” as my first solution.
A better solution may be to use Dir.chdir to change to the directory and
then use Dir.glob to extract the file names. This has the advantage of
not including the path in front of each file name.

Michael W Ryder wrote:

with dosnt know either. Most said something like "aside from a simple

Further experimenting found two other solutions. The first is to use:
a=Dir.glob(“C:/Users/Public/Music/Sample Music/*.wma”) which has the
same “problem” as my first solution.
A better solution may be to use Dir.chdir to change to the directory and
then use Dir.glob to extract the file names. This has the advantage of
not including the path in front of each file name.

chdir is not thread safe, it changes the pwd which is global to the
process. Here’s an alternative:

d = Dir.new("/tmp") # use fwd slashes even on windows
d.grep(/.wma$/)

This should give you an array of filenames in the dir.

Michael W Ryder wrote:

mistake like wrong directory/extension, I don’t know what could be going
wrong." So now this forum is my last resort, why on earth dosnt this
work?!

The only way I could get it to work is to use the example at
http://ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Dir.html and create a directory
variable such as: lfiles=Files.join(“C:”, “Users”, “Public”, “Music”,
“Sample Music”, “*.wma”) and then use a=Dir.glob(lfiles).
The only problem with that approach is that the entire path is added to
each file. I don’t know if this is a concern or not.

Further experimenting found two other solutions. The first is to use:
a=Dir.glob(“C:/Users/Public/Music/Sample Music/*.wma”) which has the
same “problem” as my first solution.
A better solution may be to use Dir.chdir to change to the directory and
then use Dir.glob to extract the file names. This has the advantage of
not including the path in front of each file name.

On 03/13/2010 01:40 AM, Michael W Ryder wrote:

with dosnt know either. Most said something like "aside from a simple

Further experimenting found two other solutions. The first is to use:
a=Dir.glob(“C:/Users/Public/Music/Sample Music/*.wma”) which has the
same “problem” as my first solution.
A better solution may be to use Dir.chdir to change to the directory and
then use Dir.glob to extract the file names. This has the advantage of
not including the path in front of each file name.

You can use Dir.entries for that:

Dir.new(“C:/Users/Public/Music/Sample Music”).entries.grep /.wma\z/i

Kind regards

robert

Joel VanderWerf wrote:

teacher has no idea why this dosnt work and the other ppl I’ve talked
Further experimenting found two other solutions. The first is to use:
d.grep(/.wma$/)

This should give you an array of filenames in the dir.

Is there a way to expand this to include subdirectories like .glob
allows? .grep doesn’t appear to work on the string created by
File.join.

On 03/13/2010 03:15 AM, Michael W Ryder wrote:

the
“Music”, “Sample Music”, “*.wma”) and then use a=Dir.glob(lfiles).
process. Here’s an alternative:

d = Dir.new("/tmp") # use fwd slashes even on windows
d.grep(/.wma$/)

This should give you an array of filenames in the dir.

Is there a way to expand this to include subdirectories like .glob
allows? .grep doesn’t appear to work on the string created by File.join.

If you want to do globbing, include subdirectories and want to have
relative paths. I would look at Pathname. You can, for example,
generate relative paths via #relative_path_from:

irb(main):025:0>
Pathname("/var/log/foo").relative_path_from(Pathname("/var"))
=> #Pathname:log/foo
irb(main):026:0>
Pathname("/var/log/foo").relative_path_from(Pathname("/var")).to_s
=> “log/foo”

Pathname has also a method #find which yields Pathname instances to the
block and can be used for things like this.

Kind regards

robert

David V. wrote:

wrong." So now this forum is my last resort, why on earth dosnt this
work?!

Looking at the source code for Dir it looks like it should accept the
above directory separators if the macro DOSISH is defined. Where is
this defined? It looks like it is part of the build process so I would
assume it would be defined if building for a Windows platform.

Michael W Ryder wrote in post #896942:

David V. wrote:

wrong." So now this forum is my last resort, why on earth dosnt this
work?!

Looking at the source code for Dir it looks like it should accept the
above directory separators if the macro DOSISH is defined. Where is
this defined? It looks like it is part of the build process so I would
assume it would be defined if building for a Windows platform.

To avoid “.” and “…” how to use the Dir::glob() method? Give me an
example please.

Dir.glob(’.’) gives you all the files in the current directory. You
can put different paths / extensions on as you like.

Documentation and loads of examples here:
http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Dir.html#method-c-glob

Michel wrote in post #1094364:

For example : To process only the files in the directory and in its
sub-directories :

Dir.glob("**/*") {|x|
if File.directory?(x) then # it’s a directory
else # It’s a file …
}

Yes But if I want to perform such search,on the directory say -
“C:\Documents and Settings\prayer\My Documents\userdata” . Then how to
pass it to the Glob() method?

Thanks

Dir.glob(“C:/Documents and Settings/prayer/My Documents/userdata/**/*”)

For example : To process only the files in the directory and in its
sub-directories :

Dir.glob("**/*") {|x|
if File.directory?(x) then # it’s a directory
else # It’s a file …
}

The asterisks are important: */

Joel P. wrote in post #1094372:

Dir.glob(“C:/Documents and Settings/prayer/My Documents/userdata/**/*”)

Hi, there is a confusion with Dir::glob method:

irb(main):001:0>Dir.glob(‘C:/Documents and Settings/peter/My
Documents/userdata/Test/’)
=> [“C:/Documents and Settings/peter/My Documents/userdata/Test/”]

But the ‘Test’ folder also have another folder like “aaa”. why it is not
appearing in the output?

Thanks

Glob without any wildcards just gives you back what you sent.

irb(main):001:0> Dir.glob ‘C:/’
=> [“C:/”]

Joel P. wrote in post #1094511:

The asterisks are important: */

Yeah,I am with you. But what the difference is between “glob” without
*/ and “glob” with **/*?

Need to understand the basic.

Thanks

Part of the confusion may be what “glob” is doing. “glob” is a term
inherited from *nix shells, which often have some terse, strange terms
for things. While Dir.glob inherits some of the conventions, it also
expands on them. The basic premise, however, remains the same: return
things that match what I give, substituting where wild cards are
placed.

This forum is not affiliated to the Ruby language, Ruby on Rails framework, nor any Ruby applications discussed here.

| Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Remote Ruby Jobs