Dependency injection with Needle gem

I am puzzling through a few things with needle and dependency
injection. I only know of one library that uses it which is net-ssh (v
1.1.2) since both were written by Jamis B…

Anyone know of another publicly available gem (or two) that uses
needle for dependency injection? The more examples I have the easier
it will be for me to figure out my development issues.

Thanks…

cr

On Apr 9, 12:39 pm, Chuck R. [email protected] wrote:

I am puzzling through a few things with needle and dependency
injection. I only know of one library that uses it which is net-ssh (v
1.1.2) since both were written by Jamis B…

Anyone know of another publicly available gem (or two) that uses
needle for dependency injection? The more examples I have the easier
it will be for me to figure out my development issues.

DI has no place in Ruby. So says Jamis B. himself:

http://weblog.jamisbuck.org/2007/7/29/net-ssh-revisited

“I’ve since learned my lesson and have come to understand that
although DI is a nifty technique that works well in some environments,
it is wholly unnecessary in Ruby. Ruby sports an agility that Java
will never know, and can get by without such crutches.”

Regards,

Dan

Chuck,
I originally started out using needle for my DI for a game I’m writing
in
ruby. However, someone showed me DIY that I like a little better
Your object dependencies are mapped out in a yaml file. It might be
something worth checking out:
http://rubyforge.org/projects/atomicobjectrb/

/Shawn

On Wed, Apr 9, 2008 at 4:44 PM, Daniel B. [email protected]
wrote:

DI has no place in Ruby. So says Jamis B. himself:

http://weblog.jamisbuck.org/2007/7/29/net-ssh-revisited

“I’ve since learned my lesson and have come to understand that
although DI is a nifty technique that works well in some environments,
it is wholly unnecessary in Ruby. Ruby sports an agility that Java
will never know, and can get by without such crutches.”

There’s a difference between dependency injection the pattern, and
dependency-injection tools/frameworks.

It’s still a good idea to write classes that have their collaborators
passed in, rather than finding or creating them internally.

One of my favorite examples:

1. Not so great

class Whatsit
def initialize
@timestamp = Time.now
end
end

2. better

class Whatsit
def initialize(clock=Time)
@timestamp = clock.now
end
end

#2 is better because it’s decoupled from the nondeterministic system
clock, and thus easier to test.

Sure, with ruby Mock Object libraries you can do things like:

Time.stub!(:now).and_return(“TIMESTAMP”)

…but this runs the risk of breaking unrelated code that also happens
to be called in the test. And no, that’s not a theoretical risk;
I’ve had real tests fail because I needed to deterministically test
time-based code and some other code (like, say, RSpec itself) depended
on Time.now.

DI frameworks may be overkill in Ruby, but DI is still a good way of
breaking up your dependencies and keeping things decoupled.


Avdi

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