Custom Blocks and Number of Items Per Port

Hi all!
I’m writing a custom sink block in Python with multiple input ports of
all
the same data type.
I’ve been reading Josh’s block coding guide, but I’m confused at one
point:
The value returned by a block should be the number of items produced by
that block.
Is this to say that if I have multiple ports, I may return the value of
input_items[0]?
Or is it correct to say that I must return the sum of all
input_items[i], i
= range(number of input ports)?

I would like to create a synchronous block where all ports consume and
produce an equal number of items every time the work function is called.
However, it appears that there are times when input_items[0] !=
input_items[1] != … != input_items[numPorts-1]
If I were to return input_items[0], I would assume that this would not
yield the results I expect!

Any help is greatly appreciated!

From,
Alex

On Wed, Aug 1, 2012 at 3:46 PM, Alexander O. [email protected]
wrote:

From,
Alex

If you have a block with multiple input items and you want to produce
the same number every time, noutput_items will tell you how much you
are capable of producing on every output stream. When you ‘return
noutput_items’, you are saying that you have produced that many items
on EVERY stream.

There is another way that specifies the same thing. Each block
consumes some number of samples on every input stream and produces
some number of samples on every output stream. You can individually
specify “produce(i, N_i)” and “consume(o, N_o)” on each input and
output stream, respectively. In this case i is the input stream and
N_i is the number of items consumed on that input stream and o is the
output stream and N_o is the number of items consumed on that output
stream. When specifying your own ‘produce’ values, though, make sure
to return WORKED_CALLED_PRODUCE, to tell the scheduler that you have
done this yourself. But it sounds like you want to produce the same
amount on every stream, so you should be fine just using ‘return
nouput_items’.

Tom

There are a few cases when input_items[0] doesn’t equal input_items[1].
If
say, len(input_items[0]) = 1000 and len(input_items[1]) = 1500, and I
returned the smaller of the two values, 1000, what would happen to the
other 500 samples on port 1? Would they be buffered somewhere and then
used
the next time the work function is called?

It seems as if the gr_sync_block is close to what Josh B. refers to as
an
Arbitrary Ratio Block in his Blocks Coding Guide.
Do you think if I were to use the forecast() function and make all
ninput_items_required[i] to be the same set amount, I would always have
the
same number of input_items[i] on each port every time the work()
function
is called? Is it this simple?

On Fri, Aug 03, 2012 at 01:38:38PM -0400, Alexander O. wrote:

There are a few cases when input_items[0] doesn’t equal input_items[1]. If say,
len(input_items[0]) = 1000 and len(input_items[1]) = 1500, and I returned the
smaller of the two values, 1000, what would happen to the other 500 samples on
port 1? Would they be buffered somewhere and then used the next time the work
function is called?

Yep. The case where the len(input_items) are different is what you
should normally prepare for.

Are you certain you can’t use a
gr_sync_{block,decimator,interpolator}?
That would make stuff much easier for you, I guess. For a start, you
wouldn’t even need to check input_items.

MB

> the same data type.
>
>
There is another way that specifies the same thing. Each block
nouput_items'.

BS Computer Engineering
[email protected]


Discuss-gnuradio mailing list
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Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
Communications Engineering Lab (CEL)

Dipl.-Ing. Martin B.
Research Associate

Kaiserstraße 12
Building 05.01
76131 Karlsruhe

Phone: +49 721 608-43790
Fax: +49 721 608-46071
www.cel.kit.edu

KIT – University of the State of Baden-Württemberg and
National Laboratory of the Helmholtz Association

On Fri, Aug 03, 2012 at 02:23:39PM -0400, Alexander O. wrote:

It seems as if the gr_sync_block is close to what Josh B. refers to as an
Arbitrary Ratio Block in his Blocks Coding Guide.

Read the guide again :slight_smile:
that’s not at all what it is.

This might also help:
http://gnuradio.org/redmine/projects/gnuradio/wiki/TutorialsCoreConcepts

…not quite finished, though.

Do you think if I were to use the forecast() function and make all
ninput_items_required[i] to be the same set amount, I would always have the
same number of input_items[i] on each port every time the work() function is
called? Is it this simple?

There should be no reason at all for wanting to have the same number of
input_items at every port. Leave that to the scheduler. Just consume
whatever items you need every time work() is called.

MB

the
Are you *certain* you can't use a gr_sync_{block,decimator,interpolator}?
>
>     point:
>     > = range(number of input ports)?
>     yield
>     are capable of producing on every output stream. When you 'return
>     stream. When specifying your own 'produce' values, though, make sure
> --
> https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnuradio
Building 05.01
Discuss-gnuradio mailing list

BS Electrical Engineering
BS Computer Engineering
[email protected]


Discuss-gnuradio mailing list
[email protected]
https://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnuradio


Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)
Communications Engineering Lab (CEL)

Dipl.-Ing. Martin B.
Research Associate

Kaiserstraße 12
Building 05.01
76131 Karlsruhe

Phone: +49 721 608-43790
Fax: +49 721 608-46071
www.cel.kit.edu

KIT – University of the State of Baden-Württemberg and
National Laboratory of the Helmholtz Association

Ideally, I’d like to have 10000 items on each port every time work() is
called, since my sink will be sending 10k snapshots of data to another
algorithm.
Right now, since I don’t have that many items on each port, I’m looking
for
the minimum number of items on all ports, saving that number of items
from
each stream to a numpy array, and then calling consume() for that number
of
items. Multiple calls to work() will eventually fill up the array. Is
this
not a good way of doing this?

On 08/03/2012 02:16 PM, Alexander O. wrote:

Ideally, I’d like to have 10000 items on each port every time work() is
called, since my sink will be sending 10k snapshots of data to another
algorithm.
Right now, since I don’t have that many items on each port, I’m looking for
the minimum number of items on all ports, saving that number of items from
each stream to a numpy array, and then calling consume() for that number of
items. Multiple calls to work() will eventually fill up the array. Is this
not a good way of doing this?

That will work. There is more than 1 way to crack the egg.

I believe that you can overload forecast to make the scheduler to the
work for you. To enable that call set_auto_consume(False)

-josh

Will the unconsumed items on ports with a larger number of samples sent
to
them be buffered up automatically, or do I need to do that myself?
i.e. If port 0 has 100 items, and port 1 has 300 items, and I consume
100
items from each port, what happens to the remaining 200 items on port 1?
Are they buffered automatically or dropped?

On 08/06/2012 09:44 AM, Alexander O. wrote:

Will the unconsumed items on ports with a larger number of samples sent to
them be buffered up automatically, or do I need to do that myself?
i.e. If port 0 has 100 items, and port 1 has 300 items, and I consume 100
items from each port, what happens to the remaining 200 items on port 1?
Are they buffered automatically or dropped?

nothing is dropped, its all held in the otput buffer of the upstream
block until all downstream readers have read. -j

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