Cpp Complier

I am trying to figure out which would be the best C++ compiler to
install on
my system. I am forced to develop on windows for my job, and I wanted
to
look into developing a ruby extension and apache mod.

I was debating between cygwin, mingw or ms cpp express. Can someone
give me
a best recomendation?

Thanks,

Allan D.
Member of NetBeans Dream Team
http://wiki.netbeans.org/NetBeansDreamTeam
Lead Developer, nbPython
http://wiki.netbeans.org/Python
http://codesnakes.blogspot.com (my blog)
http://www.linkedin.com/in/javaalley

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 2:55 PM, Allan D. [email protected]
wrote:

I am trying to figure out which would be the best C++ compiler to install on
my system. I am forced to develop on windows for my job, and I wanted to
look into developing a ruby extension and apache mod.

Passenger is already a good enough apache mod.
What would this ruby extension do? Your best looking at ffi.
Best is a very ambiguous term.

I was debating between cygwin, mingw or ms cpp express. Can someone give me
a best recomendation?

Surely there has to be an llvm compiler for windows.
It depends on what you are using it for.

Also, IronRuby might be of interest to you.

Andrew McElroy

Passenger currently does not have a windows version. I was thinking of
trying to work on that. See if that would improve our environment.

thanks,

Allan D.
Member of NetBeans Dream Team
http://wiki.netbeans.org/NetBeansDreamTeam
Lead Developer, nbPython
http://wiki.netbeans.org/Python
http://codesnakes.blogspot.com (my blog)
http://www.linkedin.com/in/javaalley

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 2:13 PM, Allan D. [email protected]
wrote:

Passenger currently does not have a windows version. I was thinking of
trying to work on that. See if that would improve our environment.

Hey member of the NetBeans Dream Team guy, you considered using JRuby on
Windows? :slight_smile:

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 11:03 PM, andrew mcelroy
[email protected]wrote:

Surely there has to be an llvm compiler for windows.
It depends on what you are using it for.

Interesting. The last time I tried to pass ruby’s code through clang it
choked on the asm keywords in vm.c. I admit that it was a half
hearted
effort and I didn’t try to figure out if there were options that would
make
it work. I hope to give it another try soon. Do you know of any
documented
successful compilations on linux?

Thanks,
Ammar

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 11:54 PM, Ammar A. [email protected]
wrote:

it work. I hope to give it another try soon. Do you know of any documented
successful compilations on linux?

Thanks,
Ammar

That should have been vm_exec.c, not vm.c

On Wed, Jul 14, 2010 at 3:57 PM, Ammar A. [email protected]
wrote:

choked on the asm keywords in vm.c. I admit that it was a half hearted
effort and I didn’t try to figure out if there were options that would make
it work. I hope to give it another try soon. Do you know of any documented
successful compilations on linux?

It’s not Linux, but it might work.
http://joneslee85.wordpress.com/2010/04/23/howto-compile-ruby-1-9-2-head-with-clang-svn-head-on-mac-os-x-10-6-3/

Andrew McElroy
tryruby.org

On Wednesday, July 14, 2010 02:55:11 pm Allan D. wrote:

I am trying to figure out which would be the best C++ compiler to install
on my system. I am forced to develop on windows for my job, and I wanted
to look into developing a ruby extension and apache mod.

I’m sure you know, but in case you don’t, Ruby runs well enough on
Windows
without Apache, and there are dozens of other webservers you could use.
If
Apache is a requirement, you could still stick Ruby server(s) behind it.

I was debating between cygwin, mingw or ms cpp express. Can someone give
me a best recomendation?

Visual C++, according to this page:

http://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.0/platform/win_compiling.html

More generally, it depends how portable the code you’re working with is,
and
how much work you’re willing to do to make it “native”. MS CPP produces
the
most native, probably best and fastest binaries with the fewest
third-party
dependencies, while Cygwin installs an entire third-party Unix
subsystem.

Where I’ve seen mingw used, it’s a nice, happy medium – a beautiful
example
is Git for Windows, which packs everything you need to get a Bash prompt
with
a functional Git (and git-gui, and gitk) into under 12 megs. That’s
including
all kinds of stuff like less, grep, vim, tar/bzip2, OpenSSH… It
basically
feels like Cygwin lite.

But if you can make it work with Visual C++, go with that.

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