Could someone explain this CGI problem?


#1

the following code sequence

cgi.div{
1…3.times{ |i|
cgi.div{
“hello from div”
}
}
}

produces

1..3

but i wanted to produce

huhu
huhu
huhu

could someone point me how to get the right result ?


#2

Hi –

On Tue, 3 Jan 2006, lg wrote:

produces

huhu
huhu

could someone point me how to get the right result ?

1…3.times is being parsed as: 1…(3.times). Since times returns its
receiver, that’s the same as: 1…3

Try this:

cgi.div {
(1…3).map {
cgi.div {
“hello from div” # or “huhu”, or whatever
}
}
}

You could also do:

cgi.div { cgi.div { “hello from div” } * 3 }

David


David A. Black
removed_email_address@domain.invalid

“Ruby for Rails”, from Manning Publications, coming April 2006!


#3

produces

1..3

This is, because the 1…3… statement returns “1…3” and this is
what cgi gets. Try it with irb.

perhaps this works (untested)

cgi.div{
temp_string=""
1…3.times{ |i|
temp_string << cgi.div{ “hello from div” }
}
temp_string
}

i.e. it collects the divs in a temporary string and gives that to the
outer div.

Patrick


#4

Hey chaps,

I’d just like to check that the following uses methods and that no
classes or instance variables are created. I see that there are no
@instance_variables
Where’s the object? What class is being used?
Am I correct in saying that say_goodnight is a method, where (name) is
the parameter for it?

#!/usr/bin/ruby

Tue Dec 27 15:42:59 GMT 2005

from page 13 of the pick-axe book

def say_goodnight(name)
“Good night, #{name.capitalize}”
# we use the output of the last result - this save time
end

Time for bed…

puts say_goodnight(‘jayeola’)
puts say_goodnight(‘john-Boy’)
puts say_goodnight(‘mary-Ellen’)
puts say_goodnight(‘mary-loo’)
puts say_goodnight(‘silly-slapper’)
puts say_goodnight(‘hex-editor’)


#5

thanks - this was the hint i needed !

regards,

lars


#6

I’d just like to check that the following uses methods and that no classes
or instance variables are created. I see that there are no
@instance_variables

Where’s the object?

try
ruby -e ‘p self’
(as if executing a ruby file containing “p self” and nothing else)
it prints “main”.
Apparently the object sees itself as main. ok.

What class is being used?

do
ruby -e ‘p self.class’
it prints “Object”
so main is an Object. tadaa!
(actually, it is a bit more than “just” an Object, but you can figure
that
out yourself when you learn about Modules and mixin)

What should you learn from this? Everything is an object. Really. But if
you
want to do some simple procedural stuff, the objects do not get in your
way.
They can be, as you experienced, completely invisible. That’s one of
many,
many reasons I like Ruby so much :slight_smile:

Am I correct in saying that say_goodnight is a method, where (name) is the
parameter for it?

absolutely correct

#!/usr/bin/ruby

Tue Dec 27 15:42:59 GMT 2005

from page 13 of the pick-axe book

def say_goodnight(name)
“Good night, #{name.capitalize}”
# we use the output of the last result - this save time
end
[snip]