Convert this Php code to ruby on rails

$_SESSION[“userpwd”] = base64_encode(mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256,
md5($cryptokey), $_POST[‘password’], MCRYPT_MODE_CBC,
md5(md5($cryptokey))));;

Thanks.

carlo bation wrote in post #994454:

$_SESSION[“userpwd”] = base64_encode(mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256,
md5($cryptokey), $_POST[‘password’], MCRYPT_MODE_CBC,
md5(md5($cryptokey))));;

Maybe this article will help:

http://blog.rapleaf.com/dev/2009/02/19/ruby-and-mcrypt/

As it says at the top of the article there is usually little reason to
need mcrypt with Ruby. Instead Ruby contains an OpenSSL implementation
that should provided all the crypto functions without the need for
additional crypto libraries.

On Friday, April 22, 2011 2:09:08 AM UTC-6, Ruby-Forum.com User wrote:

$_SESSION[“userpwd”] = base64_encode(mcrypt_encrypt(MCRYPT_RIJNDAEL_256,
md5($cryptokey), $_POST[‘password’], MCRYPT_MODE_CBC,
md5(md5($cryptokey))));;

Thanks.

I don’t know if you just need help doing equivalent crypto operations in
ruby, or if you need something that is binary-compatible with the above
code
(to have a ruby and php app. inter-operate for example).

If you just need equivalent crypto/encoding operations then I’d use
OpenSSL
(through the OpenSSL gem). MD5 hashing is available through Digest::MD5
(require ‘digest/md5’). Base64 encoding/decoding can be done through the
Base64 module.

However, if you need to have the exact, binary-compatible ruby
equivalent,
then you need to be aware (if using OpenSSL) that mcrypt doesn’t do
PKCS-style padding (it just zero-pads if I remember correctly). This bit
me
when making a rails app. that had to read and write roundcube (a php
app)
session data and so if you’re doing something similar, you’ll want to be
aware of the fact. You can tell OpenSSL to zero-pad if you need to:
http://www.ruby-forum.com/topic/208273

On Apr 22, 6:56pm, Kendall G. [email protected] wrote:

On Friday, April 22, 2011 11:54:00 AM UTC-6, Kendall G. wrote:

… then I’d use OpenSSL (through the OpenSSL gem).

Woops, did I say OpenSSL gem? That’d be the OpenSSL class in the standard

library:http://www.ruby-doc.org/stdlib/libdoc/openssl/rdoc/index.html

The ezcrypto gem is way easier to use, unless you happen to be used to
using the openssl C api

Fred

On Friday, April 22, 2011 11:54:00 AM UTC-6, Kendall G. wrote:

… then I’d use OpenSSL (through the OpenSSL gem).

Woops, did I say OpenSSL gem? That’d be the OpenSSL class in the standard
library: http://www.ruby-doc.org/stdlib/libdoc/openssl/rdoc/index.html

On Friday, April 22, 2011 1:01:28 PM UTC-6, Frederick C. wrote:

The ezcrypto gem is way easier to use, unless you happen to be used to
using the openssl C api

Fred

Yeah, I’d agree with that (used it on one project a while back). I
couldn’t
remember the name of it though.

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