Confusion with Strings

From the book I read a line about string :

“If you try to set part of the string that doesn’t exist— a too-high
or
too-low numerical index
, or a string or regular expression that
doesn’t match the string—you get a fatal error.”

Could you give one example against the line within ****?

Thanks in advance.

Are you really saying that you don’t understand the concept of one
number being higher than another?! Try it for yourself in IRB!
And all this after saying “The whole topic is understood by me.” about
blocks and parenthetical parsing!

Joel P. wrote in post #1101267:

Are you really saying that you don’t understand the concept of one
number being higher than another?! Try it for yourself in IRB!
And all this after saying “The whole topic is understood by me.” about
blocks and parenthetical parsing!

What does it mean by too high or too low ? I didn’t understand the
line.

Dude really?? You don’t understand how a String has positions for each
character, and how you can supply a number, that corresponds to possible
positions, that is either too high or too low?

WHEN are you going to do some actual studying? WHEN are you going to
stop nickel and diming this damned list with all of these stupid
questions that are answerable with

A) COMMON FRIGGIN SENSE!
B) Google and reading the documentation (such as on Strings)

This is getting ridiculous and I’m REALLY getting tired of seeing these
crappy assed questions that shows BLATANTLY that you’re neither paying
attention to what people tell you, nor reading the documentation and
really attempting to understand. NOR are you actually READING the output
from irb and trying to understand it. You just dump to the list with Oh,
I didn’t IMMEDIATELY understand what happened, I’m not going to take the
time TO understand it, I’ll just dump it to the list and let THEM
understand it FOR me! Yeah, thats what I’ll do!

Now you’re just being lazy, and consequently, stupid.

And all this after saying “The whole topic is understood by me.” about
blocks and parenthetical parsing!


D. Deryl D.

“The bug which you would fright me with I seek” - William Shakespeare

  • The Winter’s Tale, Act III, Scene II - A court of Justice.

On 12 March 2013 19:25, Love U Ruby [email protected] wrote:


Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.

Do you know how to set any part of a string using a numerical index?

For example, if I wrote the following in irb:

s = “hello”
=> “hello”

could you set the “e” to “u”, so that

s == “hullo” # => true
?

Once you can do that, try it with different numerical indices.

Am 12.03.2013 21:44, schrieb Cliff R.:

Language problems here. Not worth getting worked up over imho.

I disagree, considering the by now hundreds(!) of pointless,
unreflected, confused posts.

Instead of helping people with real problems, too many people
–myself included, sadly enough-- waste their time with these
endlessly dragged on discussions over banalities.

@Scott.

yes I do here it ia:

s = “hello”
=> “hello”

s[“e”] = “u”
=> “u”

s
=> “hullo”

The answer to the line **a too-high or too-low numerical index **

str = ‘aaa’
=> “aaa”

str[-4] = “x”
IndexError: index -4 out of string
from (irb):57:in []=' from (irb):57 from C:/Ruby193/bin/irb:12:in

str[-5] = “x”
IndexError: index -5 out of string
from (irb):58:in []=' from (irb):58 from C:/Ruby193/bin/irb:12:in

str[4] = “x”
IndexError: index 4 out of string
from (irb):59:in []=' from (irb):59 from C:/Ruby193/bin/irb:12:in

Actually that word too big and too small made me to think too much…
lollzzzzzzz.

Guys if my understanding with the line is wrong then please correct me.

Language problems here. Not worth getting worked up over imho.

Hahaha. 2 days into subscribing to this list and I’m already happy I
did.

Love U Ruby, I’m new to Ruby and have only been studying it for a week
or
so. Have you tried Ruby tutorials on youtube? I’m also learning from
the
Programming Ruby book on the website. Also looks like Larry U.'s book
on
Ruby is highly recommended on Amazon for beginners- I plan on getting a
copy of that as well.

On Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 4:03 PM, D. Deryl D.
[email protected]n.invalidwrote:

number being higher than another?! Try it for yourself in IRB!
And all this after saying “The whole topic is understood by me.” about
blocks and parenthetical parsing!


D. Deryl D.

“The bug which you would fright me with I seek” - William Shakespeare -
The Winter’s Tale, Act III, Scene II - A court of Justice.


Aghori Shaivite

www.aghoriverse.com
aghorishaivite.deviantart.com
agorasphere.blogspot.com

What usually happens is you guys respond in haste, usually with an angry
tone. He figures it out on his own, despite the responses, by finally
stumbling through it in IRB 30 minutes later. Why not just ignore him?
Force him to fart around in IRB until he answers his own question? This
would, in part, clean up some of the negative tone that has plagued the
list recently.

On Mar 12, 2013, at 14:44 , [email protected] wrote:

Instead of helping people with real problems, too many people
–myself included, sadly enough-- waste their time with these
endlessly dragged on discussions over banalities.

Yes, even after saying you won’t waste your time anymore… so why do
you?

I’ve said I’m done with this person… and I am. I suggest you join me.

Ryan D. wrote in post #1101335:

On Mar 12, 2013, at 14:44 , [email protected] wrote:

Instead of helping people with real problems, too many people
–myself included, sadly enough-- waste their time with these
endlessly dragged on discussions over banalities.

Yes, even after saying you won’t waste your time anymore… so why do
you?

http://xkcd.com/386/

For some reason the page won’t load for me :confused: I’ll just assume it’s the
one about someone being wrong on the internet.

Hi,

I have some confusion with “ancestor” method.

Can you help me out to clear the concept?

class A
end

A.ancestors # => [A, Object, Kernel, BasicObject] <~~ Here why came? I
actually expect the output as below one.

A.class.ancestors # => [Class, Module, Object, Kernel, BasicObject]

Love U Ruby wrote in post #1101762:

Hi,

class A
end

A.ancestors # => [A, Object, Kernel, BasicObject]

My question is - how does A come in the output of A.ancestors ?

On Mar 15, 2013 11:42 PM, “Love U Ruby” [email protected] wrote:

A.ancestors # => [A, Object, Kernel, BasicObject] <~~ Here why came? I
actually expect the output as below one.

A.class.ancestors # => [Class, Module, Object, Kernel, BasicObject]

Think of this:

a = A.new
a.class #=> A
a.class.ancestors #=> [A, Object, Kernel, BasicObject]
a.is_a? Object #=> true
a.is_a? Module #=> false

A.class #=> Class
A.class.ancestors #=> [Class, Module, Object, Kernel, BasicObject]
A.is_a? Object #=> true
A.is_a? Module #=> true

So x.ancestors means “list of classes and modules x extends/includes”
and
y.class.ancestors means “list of classes and modules y.is_a? or
y.instance_of?”

This question should be in a separate thread.

Sent from my phone, so excuse the typos.

On Mar 16, 2013 7:10 AM, “Love U Ruby” remov[email protected] wrote:

My question is - how does A come in the output of A.ancestors ?

Based on my previous samples:

a.is_a? A #=> true
A.is_a? A #=> false

The first is true because A.ancestors.include? A

You can also do this:

def decl cls
cls.ancestors.reverse.inject do |p,c|
puts “class #{c} < #{p}”
puts ‘end’
end
end
decl A

Note: I’ve ignored included modules.

Sent from my phone, so excuse the typos.

Matthew K. wrote in post #1101845:

You can also do this:

Argh, I couldn’t let it sit there so wrong.

def decl cls
cls.ancestors.reverse.inject do |p,c|
puts “class #{c} < #{p}”
puts ‘end’
c # <<<
end
end
decl A

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