Configurability 1.0.0

Version 1.0.0 of configurability has been released.

Configurability is a mixin that allows you to add configurability to one
or
more objects or classes. You can assign them each a subsection of the
configuration, and then later, when the configuration is loaded, the
configuration is split up and sent to the objects that will use it.

Usage

To add configurability to a class, just require the library and extend
the class:

class User
    extend Configurability
end

Or, add it to a instance:

user = User.new
user.extend( Configurability )

Later, when you’ve loaded the configuration, can can call

Configurability.configure_objects( config )

and the config will be spliced up and sent to all the objects that
have
been extended with it. Configurability expects the configuration to be
broken up into a number of sections, each of which is accessible via
either
a method with the section name or the index operator (#[]) that
takes the
section name as a Symbol or a String:

config.section_name
config[:section_name]
config['section_name']

The section name is based on an object’s config key, which is the name
of
the object that is being extended with all non-word characters converted
into
underscores (_) by default. It will also have any leading Ruby-style
namespaces stripped, e.g.,

MyClass            -> :myclass
Acme::User         -> :user
"J. Random Hacker" -> :j_random_hacker

If the object responds to the #name method, then the return value of
that
method is used to derive the name. If it doesn’t have a #name method,
the
name of its Class will be used instead. If its class is anonymous,
then
the object’s config key will be :anonymous.

When the configuration is loaded, an instance variable called @config
is set
to the appropriate section of the config object for each object that has
been extended with Configurability.

Customization

The default behavior above is just provided as a reasonable default; it
is
expected that you’ll want to customize at least one or two things about
how configuration is handled in your objects.

Setting a Custom Config Key

The first thing you might want to do is change the config section that
corresponds to your object. You can do that by declaring a different
config key, either using a declarative method:

class OutputFormatter
    extend Configurability
    config_key :format
end

or by overriding the #config_key method and returning the desired
value
as a Symbol:

class User
    extend Configurability
    def self::config_key
        return :employees
    end
end

Changing How an Object Is Configured

You can also change what happens when an object is configured by
implementing
a #configure method that takes the config section as an argument:

class WebServer
    extend Configurability

    def self::configure( configsection )
        @default_bind_addr = configsection[:host]
        @default_port = configsection[:port]
    end
end

If you still want the config variable to be set, just super from
your implementation; don’t if you don’t want it to be set.

Installation

Via gems:

$ sudo gem install configurability

or from source:

$ wget http://deveiate.org/code/configurability-1.0.0.tar.gz
$ tar -xzvf configurability-1.0.0.tar.gz
$ cd configurability-1.0.0
$ sudo rake install

Changes

This is the first release.

Development

You can submit bug reports, suggestions, and read more about future
plans at
the project page:

http://bitbucket.org/ged/configurability

or clone it with Mercurial from the same address.

License

Copyright © 2010, Michael G.
All rights reserved.

Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are
met:

  • Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright notice,
    this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.

  • Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
    notice,
    this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
    documentation
    and/or other materials provided with the distribution.

  • Neither the name of the author/s, nor the names of the project’s
    contributors may be used to endorse or promote products derived from
    this
    software without specific prior written permission.

THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED BY THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS AND CONTRIBUTORS “AS
IS”
AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,
THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR
PURPOSE ARE
DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE COPYRIGHT OWNER OR CONTRIBUTORS BE
LIABLE
FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, OR
CONSEQUENTIAL
DAMAGES (INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS
OR
SERVICES; LOSS OF USE, DATA, OR PROFITS; OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTION)
HOWEVER
CAUSED AND ON ANY THEORY OF LIABILITY, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, STRICT
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OR TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE OR OTHERWISE) ARISING IN ANY WAY OUT OF
THE USE
OF THIS SOFTWARE, EVEN IF ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGE.

On Monday, July 12, 2010 06:20:15 pm Michael G. wrote:

It will also have any leading
Ruby-style namespaces stripped, e.g.,

Acme::User         -> :user

What’s the rationale for stripping namespaces? It looks like hashes are
supported, so the above could be configured with something like:

Configurability.configure_objects({
:user => {:foo => ‘bar’},

})

It seems to me that I’d want something more like this:

Configurability.configure_objects({
:acme => {
:user => {:foo => ‘bar’}
},

})

Especially since the whole point of namespacing things is to avoid
naming
conflicts, so I could conceivably have:

Configurability.configure_objects({
:acme => {
:user = {:foo => ‘bar’},
:anvil => {
:user => ‘Wile E. Coyote’
}
},
:examplecorp => {
:user => {:something => ‘else’}
}
})

It looks like I could still do something like that by overriding the
config
key, but that would flatten it to:

Configurability.configure_objects({
:acme_user => {:foo => ‘bar’},
:acme_anvil => {:user => ‘Wile E. Coyote’},
:examplecorp_user => {:something => ‘else’}
})

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