Compressed_file_sink/source?


#1

Has anyone explored inserting a compression algorithm before a file_sink
or a file_source? I made a gzip_file_sink, but it just can’t keep up
at low decimation rates. Are there good compression libs that anyone
would recommend instead?

Similarly, has anyone explored writing a MATLAB script that can load
compressed data? The only thing I could find was to gunzip and then load
it normally, but that defeats the whole purpose. The other option would
be to write a MATLAB module in c that linked with zlib (or implement
gzip decompression myself in MATLAB), but those both seem to be pretty
awful solutions.

Thanks!

Dan


#2

Gzip will be slow. You might look at some lossless audio compressors.
“wavepack” looks like it might work.
See here for a good overview with links
http://wiki.hydrogenaudio.org/index.php?title=Lossless_comparison#WavPack_.28WV.29

One way to implement this would be as a “filtered” source or sink.
Like a file source/sink but the user gets to specify a filter type
program that could do something to the data, such as compress or
decompress. With luck the operating system would schedule the filter
process to run on a different core/CPU and it could go fast

— Dan H. removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

Has anyone explored inserting a compression algorithm before a
file_sink
or a file_source? I made a gzip_file_sink, but it just can’t keep
up
at low decimation rates. Are there good compression libs that anyone
would recommend instead?

Chris Albertson
Home: 310-376-1029 removed_email_address@domain.invalid
Office: 310-336-5189 removed_email_address@domain.invalid


Finding fabulous fares is fun.
Let Yahoo! FareChase search your favorite travel sites to find flight
and hotel bargains.


#3

I see that you can buy a PS3 now with YDL linux installed.
(http://www.terrasoftsolutions.com/products/sony/) How are the efforts
to
get gnu radio running on it going?

I don’t play video games but I’m seriously considering buying to get the
bluray player, Would be great if I can run gnuradio too.

Thanks,
Clark


http://liveearth.msn.com


#4

So far I have been unable to get the python to work properly on any
Power PC running Linux. It runs on Mac OSX but not PPC. For example,

make check

fails in a segmentation error in the base routine that runs the actual
checks.

It is no trouble at all to get GnuRadio to make and install on the PS3
running FC6. It took me about 3 hours. It is just that nothing runs
after that.

Eric B. is going to begin work on getting GnuRadio to run on the
Cell processor after he returns from vacation later this month. I am
certain he will resolve this issue early in the process.

Bob

Clark P. wrote:


http://liveearth.msn.com


Discuss-gnuradio mailing list
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
http://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnuradio


AMSAT Director and VP Engineering. Member: ARRL, AMSAT-DL,
TAPR, Packrats, NJQRP, QRP ARCI, QCWA, FRC. ARRL SDR WG Chair
“If you’re going to be crazy, you have to get paid for it or
else you’re going to be locked up.” Hunter S. Thompson


#5

Tom R. wrote (in a different thread):

You can run GNU Radio using the new version of the hierarchical blocks.

Strictly speaking, the new hierarchical blocks should really be called
“new runtime with (optionally) nestable flow graphs.” Existing,
“single-level” flow graphs will run nearly unchanged, with some fairly
minor syntactic changes in the the code.

Thus, release 3.1 will have a new way to create flow graphs of existing
blocks. In addition, this new capability will allow one to encapsulate
an entire flow graph, with arbitrary numbers of inputs and outputs, into
a single block definition, which can then itself be used in another
flowgraph, etc. (Contrast this to the existing hierarchical blocks,
which can only take a single input and single output.)

The plan for the 3.1 release is to duplicate the existing GNU Radio
examples but use the the new infrastructure for them. In addition, the
hierarchical blocks that live in the blks namespace will be duplicated
into blks2. As of 3.1 the “old” way of using gr.flow_graph will be
supported, but deprecated.

Having this period of time where these both exist side by side will
allow a graceful cut over in user code, and in release 3.2, we’ll be
removing the old way of doing things.

In the trunk right now, the code is done and is usable, but still has
some issues. If you just want to create flat or nested flow graphs, it
works fine. Josh B. has converted his GNU Radio Companion project to
use the new feature set.

A new capability, however, is to be able to reconfigure a running flow
graph and preserve all the data in transit between blocks that are
unaffected. This is buggy right now and will likely remain
“experimental” for the release.

The new runtime and flow graph infrastructure is now written entirely in
C++. This foreshadows another release 3.2 feature, the ability to write
GNU Radio applications entirely in C++, with no Python interpreter
needed.


Johnathan C.
Corgan Enterprises LLC
http://corganenterprises.com


#6

You can run GNU Radio using the new version of the hierarchical blocks.
The example in gnuradio-examples/python/hier/usrp/usrp_siggen.py runs on
PS3 as is. The reason is due to more of the scheduling being handled in
C++ and very minimal work in Python. I tracked down the problem in the
Python scheduler where, for some reason, the memory addresses of the
blocks get corrupted. I didn’t go any further to figure out why, though.

Of course, it just runs on the PPE element, and there is still plenty of
work to be done to make real use of the CELL processor properly.

Tom


#7

Well after the $100 price drop I couldn’t resist so I have my 60 GB PS3
now.
Bought a used package so probably only be ~$350 out of pocket after I
sell
off the games. Probably half what a stand alone bluray player will cost
you.

Didn’t realize it was designed to host an extra OS. I thought people
were
hacking it to get Linux on. Turns out you can have Linux AND all the
existing video game console functionality.

Anyway, you’re saying the way to go is FC6 and not YDL, right? Maybe
Eric
can confirm he plans to use FC6?

Thanks,
Clark

corrupted. I didn’t go any further to figure out why, though.

PC running Linux. It runs on Mac OSX but not PPC. For example,
Eric B. is going to begin work on getting GnuRadio to run on the Cell

(http://www.terrasoftsolutions.com/products/sony/) How are the efforts
Discuss-gnuradio mailing list
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
http://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnuradio


http://newlivehotmail.com


#8

Eric might still be on vacation in South America or Europe!

Eric is running triple boot, FC5, FC6, and YDL. I run FC6 and GnuRadio
compiles just fine but does not run. I have asked here if there is
ANYONE who has GnuRadio compiling and running on ANY kind of power PC
running FC6 and received no answer.

Work on porting relevant routines from GnuRadio to the PS3 is being
supported by contract. I am expecting that work to begin in earnest
this month. The bureaucrats are in the way of rapid progress but we now
it will happen.

Bob

Clark P. wrote:

Eric can confirm he plans to use FC6?

Thanks,
Clark


Robert W. McGwier, Ph.D.
Center for Communications Research
805 Bunn Drive
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609)-924-4600
(sig required by employer)


#9

Clark P. wrote:

Anyway, you’re saying the way to go is FC6 and not YDL, right? Maybe
Eric can confirm he plans to use FC6?

I’ve been on the YDL list for a while, since we use them for their Apple
XServe support. (I run FC6 on my G5 Tower desktop, for the reasons
that I’ll mention shortly).

From the discussions I’ve read, it seems that if you want to fully
exploit the Cell parts of the CPU, YDL is probably the way to go – at
least they’re packaging a lot of Cell-specific development tools that
look like they could be useful. Also, the TerraSoft crew is quite
responsive to the needs of their scientific/numerical users.

On the other hand, if you want something that looks like a regular Linux
desktop, then Fedora is certainly the way to go – there are a lot more
pre-compiled packages, especially WRT desktop and multimedia
applications. Can anyone say anything more about Cell support on
Fedora?

Why not try both and see which one matches your needs better?

-Luke


#10

I’ve been on the YDL list for a while, since we use them for their Apple
desktop, then Fedora is certainly the way to go – there are a lot more
pre-compiled packages, especially WRT desktop and multimedia applications.
Can anyone say anything more about Cell support on Fedora?

Why not try both and see which one matches your needs better?

-Luke

My main interest is signal processing (though I’m thinking about playing
with mythtv), so I’m just looking for the the load that is most likely
to be
supported by gnuradio. I guess I’ll go with whatever eric picks when he
gets
back.

-Clark


Local listings, incredible imagery, and driving directions - all in one
place! http://maps.live.com/?wip=69&FORM=MGAC01


#11

Luke Scharf wrote:

least they’re packaging a lot of Cell-specific development tools that
-Luke
Most of IBM’s development tools are built for FC5/6. I tried working
with them under Ubuntu, but the amount of time to get everything working
wasn’t worth it and they worked out of the box/rpm under an FC6
installation.

This stuff includes the SPU/PPU GCC compiler’s, IBM’s CELL compilers,
the libspe2 library, the binutils, etc., as well as their simulation
environment for not running on a cell machine.

Now, I say this, but frankly, I don’t like Fedora. If I could use
Debian/Ubuntu on the PS3, I would, but for the tools support, this is
just the way to go.

Tom


#12

OK, using OpenEmbedded, I built a file sysem image with GNU Radio
(from svn) for my EFIKA board. usrper can set the led fine :slight_smile:

Now, I am not a GNU Radio user. I do have these files in /usr/bin

root@efika:~$ usrp
usrp_cal_dc_offset usrp_ra_receiver.py usrper
usrp_flex.py usrp_radar_mono.py
usrp_psr_receiver.py usrp_sounder.py

What would be a good GNU Radio test on a 500 MHz PPC board, with a
USRP, but no display?

Philip


#13

Philip B. wrote:

What would be a good GNU Radio test on a 500 MHz PPC board, with a
USRP, but no display?

To just test that GNU Radio itself is sane, you can run the dial tone
demo in:

gnuradio-examples/python/audio/dial_tone.py

This will send a dial tone to the audio output.

You can test the USB <–> USRP performance using:

gnuradio-examples/python/usrp/benchmark_usb.py

If you have a suitable receiver board, you can test the whole system by
receiving a broadcast FM signal:

gnuradio-examples/python/usrp/usrp_wfm_rcv_nogui.py
(You need to set which receive side with -R and frequency with -f)


Johnathan C.
Corgan Enterprises LLC
http://corganenterprises.com


#14

Hello,

Now, I say this, but frankly, I don’t like Fedora. If I could use
Debian/Ubuntu on the PS3, I would, but for the tools support, this is
just the way to go.

Just in case you did not know:

Installing Cell BE SDK V2.0 on a Debian Host
http://blog.perlplexity.org/?p=3

For installing instructions for Debian on Ps3
http://www.keshi.org/moin/moin.cgi/PS3/Debian/Live

Ubuntu’s one
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=316047

Regards


#15

That needs a Linux ALSA sink.

Bob


Johnathan C. wrote:

This will send a dial tone to the audio output.


AMSAT Director and VP Engineering. Member: ARRL, AMSAT-DL,
TAPR, Packrats, NJQRP, QRP ARCI, QCWA, FRC. ARRL SDR WG Chair
“If you’re going to be crazy, you have to get paid for it or
else you’re going to be locked up.” Hunter S. Thompson


#16

Hector Oron wrote:

For installing instructions for Debian on Ps3
http://www.keshi.org/moin/moin.cgi/PS3/Debian/Live

Ubuntu’s one
http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=316047

Regards

I had not seen the first one on getting the SDK onto Debian. The one I
saw used alien to convert to deb files, but that didn’t work. I’ll have
to check this out soon.

Thanks for the link!
Tom


#17

High Performance SDR ( http://hpsdr.org ) has been working on a high
end audio interface for SDR (up to 192 kHz bandwidth at baseband, I/Q
delivery over USB 2.0). It has a PWM modulator, and even a microphone
hookup and codec for microphone and speakers.

The set of boards required is Atlas (because it holds up all of the
experimental boards), Janus (because he was god of doorways, beginnings
and endings), and Ozy (short for Ozymandias, the Shelley “ode”-ed king
of old). The Atlas backplane/bus is REALLY expensive. I don’t know if
most can afford its $28 price tag. Janus is $179 and Ozy is $149. That
is cheaper than a really high end sound card. The Janus uses the
AKM5394A, the best audio A/D around so far as I can tell. It is used in
the Lynx Studios sound cards, the creative Emu, and in the Flex Radio
5000 series, all with good reason. (see http://www.tapr.org

Beginning late this summer, but not before, after we get GnuRadio to
actually run on the PS3, I will work with Frank and others to make this
work. It uses libusb and I do not foresee major difficulties. I think
we need intially to do a user space interface and then have an alsa
plugin to access it. Thanks to Frank for pointing out the obvious. If
anyone else wants to tackle this, jump all over it.

Bob

Jens Osterkamp wrote:


Discuss-gnuradio mailing list
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
http://lists.gnu.org/mailman/listinfo/discuss-gnuradio


Robert W. McGwier, Ph.D.
Center for Communications Research
805 Bunn Drive
Princeton, NJ 08540
(609)-924-4600
(sig required by employer)


#18

On Friday 13 July 2007, Tom R. wrote:

http://blog.perlplexity.org/?p=3
saw used alien to convert to deb files, but that didn’t work. I’ll have
to check this out soon.

Matthias Klose is currently working on ppe/spe toolchain packages for
Ubuntu :

http://ozlabs.org/pipermail/cbe-oss-dev/2007-June/002385.html

Gruß,

Jens