Command interpretation


#1

Hallo,

I searched high and low to find how “command interpretation” actually
works. But all I found is [1]:

echo command interpretation with interpolation and backslashes
%x(echo command interpretation with interpolation and backslashes)

Now, this does not explain what kind of interpolation is done and more
importantly: How to switch interpolation off.

Background: I use ruby on the vms operating system and I want to run the
following test command:

x = ´WRITE SYS$OUTPUT F$TRNLNM(“SOURCE”)´

But all I get is:

test.ruby:8: warning: parenthesize argument(s) for future version
test.ruby:8: parse error
x = ´WRITE SYS$OUTPUT F$TRNLNM(“SOURCE”)´
^
From which I deduct that some “magic” is done with the $ character
which I don’t want.

Martin
[1]
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/Syntax/Literals#Interpolation


#2

On 07.05.2007 12:43, Martin Krischik wrote:

                    ^

From which I deduct that some “magic” is done with the $ character
which I don’t want.

Martin
[1]
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Ruby_Programming/Syntax/Literals#Interpolation

Use system with multiple arguments. I think that should help.

robert


#3

On Mon, May 07, 2007 at 07:45:05PM +0900, Martin Krischik wrote:

                    ^

From which I deduct that some “magic” is done with the $ character
which I don’t want.

In the mail you sent, I saw character \264 (octal) where there should be
a
backtick. A backtick is \140 (octal), \x60 (hex), 96 (decimal)

Have you tried using %x(…) instead?


#4

On Mon, 07 May 2007 12:43:19 +0200, Martin Krischik wrote:

                     ^

From which I deduct that some “magic” is done with the $ character
which I don’t want.

What kind of quote is a ´ ? It doesn’t work out to be a backquote when I
view it on my Linux system. Unlike perl and the shell, the $ isn’t used
for any magic in Ruby strings. (The #{} syntax is used instead.) The
interpreter has decided to parse this as a function call within Ruby,
and
I’m guessing that’s because your quotes aren’t quotes.

–Ken


#5

Brian C. schrieb:

x = ´WRITE SYS$OUTPUT F$TRNLNM(“SOURCE”)´
^
From which I deduct that some “magic” is done with the $ character
which I don’t want.

In the mail you sent, I saw character \264 (octal) where there should be a
backtick. A backtick is \140 (octal), \x60 (hex), 96 (decimal)

Another good reason to retire back ticks.

Have you tried using %x(…) instead?

Indeed that works - thanks!

Martin