Best DRY solution for this task

Hi,
I have a certain problem here and can’t find a proper DRY solution for
this so I wondered if someone here has an idea and could help me.

I’m reading a file byte for byte. This file is structured and I try to
give out each structures element and the meaning of it. So let’s pretend
the file content would be this in bytes (you get it e.g. with
file.read(7)): 1 3d 0 233 0 1 2f

now I wanna read the file byte for byte and output if the first 3 bytes
are equal 1 3d 0:
startflag : good (1 3d 0)
or if the check fails
startflag : bad (2 3d 0)
now the fourth byte is read and if it is 1
debg_mode : on
if it is 0 : out and if it is 233 : don’t know …

My problem with a DRY solution is that some bytes in this file are
grouped together and have just together a meaning as the first three
starting bytes: 1 3d 0 at the beginning and some bytes have alone a
meaning as the fourth byte 233 in the example.
And that everything has another ouput. So the first three bytes meaning
is another than the one of the fourt or the fifth byte.

My solution until now:

target = open(‘testfile.txt’,‘r’)

startflag = target.read(3)
print(“startflag: “)
if startflag == $startflag # here I took a global var because
“\x13d0” didn’t work
print(” good”)
else
print(" bad")
end
startflag.each_byte do |x|
printf("%x ",x)
end
puts “”

dbg_mode = target.read(1)
printf(“dbg_mode: “)
if dbg_mode == “\x1”
print(” on”)
elseif dbg_mode == “\x255”
print(“don’t know”)
else
print(" bad")
end
dbg_mode.each_byte {|x| printf("%x ",x) }
puts “”

and so on and on and on…

so how can I do this check and outputting better? Because there are many
bytes with many different meanings and as said sometimes I need to read
in 4 bytes then just one then again 2 bytes… is this at all possible
to do dry-like?

thanks


greets

                 one must still have chaos in oneself to be able to

give birth to a dancing star

On Jun 6, 11:57 am, anansi [email protected] wrote:

I’m reading a file byte for byte. This file is structured and I try to
give out each structures element and the meaning of it. So let’s pretend
the file content would be this in bytes (you get it e.g. with
file.read(7)): 1 3d 0 233 0 1 2f

a) You might want to look into the BitStruct library.
b) See the following. It’s up to you how much work you want to put in
the common ‘eat’ method, versus how much you want to leave up to the
proc for each particular matcher.

Just for no-file testing

require ‘stringio’
bytes = [ 1, 0x3d, 0, 233, 0, 1, 0x2f ]
byte_string = StringIO.new( bytes.map{ |b| b.chr }.join )

class ByteEater
def initialize( title, num_bytes, &block )
@title = title
@num_bytes = num_bytes
@proc = block
end
def eat( file )
bytes = file.read( @num_bytes )
print( "#@title: " )
@proc.call( bytes )
bytes.each_byte{ |x| print “%x” % x }
puts “”
end
end

structure = [
ByteEater.new( ‘startflag’, 3 ){ |bytes|
if bytes == “\01\x3d\0”
print " good"
else
print " bad"
end
},
ByteEater.new( ‘dbg_mode’, 1 ){ |bytes|
case bytes
when 1.chr
print " on"
when 255.chr
print “don’t know”
else
print “bad”
end
},
]

structure.each{ |eater|
eater.eat( byte_string )
}

#=> startflag: good13d0
#=> dbg_mode: bade9

so how can I do this check and outputting better? Because
there are many
bytes with many different meanings and as said sometimes I
need to read
in 4 bytes then just one then again 2 bytes… is this at all
possible
to do dry-like?

Without knowing the details of the file you’re trying to parse it’s hard
to say, but you might be well-served to write a simple finite state
machine. E.g. something like:

mode = :expect_header
while !(mode == :done || mode == :fail)
case mode
when :expect_header
if target.read(3) == $startflag
mode = :expect_debug
else
mode = :fail
end
when :expect_debug
case target.read(1)
when “\x1”
debug = true
mode = :expect_body
when “\x255”
debug = nil
mode = :expect_body
else
mode = :fail
end
end
end

  • donald

On 06.06.2007 22:12, Ball, Donald A Jr (Library) wrote:

machine. E.g. something like:
when :expect_debug
end
end

You can even nest cases

mode = :expect_header
while !(mode == :done || mode == :fail)
case mode
when :expect_header
mode = case target.read(3)
when “\x1\x3d\x0”
:expect_debug
else
:fail
end
when :expect_debug
mode = case target.read(1)
when “\x1”
debug = true
:expect_body
when “\xff”
debug = nil
:expect_body
else
:fail
end
end
end
end

If you use nil as :fail then it becomes even simpler because you can
omit “else” branches in “case”. Another alternative is to throw
immediately when an error occurs.

Just some more food for experimening.

Kind regards

robert

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