Another newbie question

Hi all

I have re-installed Ubuntu 9.04 and still have questions regarding
getting
gnuradio up and running.

Following these instructions

"GNU Radio Release 3.2

With the latest GNU Radio release 3.2, binary package installation is
available for Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty), bypassing the need for manually
installing build tool prerequisites and performing a source code
installation. In addition, installation and configuration of the USRP
and
USRP2 is automated. This is fastest and easiest way to get a working GNU
Radio platform.

The rest of this page is now somewhat outdated and needs some
reorganization. "

I went to “Debian Package Repository for GNU Radio” and followed the
instructions. Everything seems to have installed corrctly. I am able to
open
GNU RADIO COMPANION. But how do I get a “working GNU Radio platform” as
stated above in “GNU Radio Release 3.2”? Do I have to build it from
scratch
in grc? Or do I have to still build it from scratch using the “Build
Guide”
(which I tried without success.)?

From what I can interpret in the first paragraph under “GNU Radio
Release
3.2”, it is not necessary to build from the “Build Guide” if I have
Ubuntu
9.04 and using the latest GNU Radio release 3.2 - I can just use the
“binary
package” installation.

I have searched the web but haven’t been successful in finding the
information I need.

I guess my question is to get gnuradio up and running do I need to build
it
from scratch using grc or is there a quicker(interpret easier) way of
doing
it?

Thanks

Steve

I never installed Gnuradio using a Debian package but if GRC is working
that
means your Gnuradio installation must be complete. Why don’t you try
running
a few example programs and see if they work.

Run the dial_tone.py in the /usr/local/share/gnuradio/examples/audio
directory. If you want to use GRC to run the example programs then run
dial_tone.grc program in /usr/local/share/gnuradio/examples/grc
directory.
If you hear a dial_tone then most probably the installation is fine. If
you
have a USRP then you will find examples in ‘digital’ directory in the
same
path.

On another note I don’t understand what you mean by "Do I have to build
it
from scratch
in grc? Or do I have to still build it from scratch using the “Build
Guide”. If its a debian package then the installation is done by the
debian
package manager and what you have at the end is a working installation.
GRC
is just a graphical tool and has got nothing to do with installation of
gnuradio. Installation of Gnuradio from the source package is not at all
difficult no matter how new one is to Linux. Just follow the
instructions
given here http://gnuradio.org/trac/wiki/UbuntuInstall and you will find
how
easy it is to install. If you still have problems then we can help you.

Mir

2009/9/26 Steve M. [email protected]

Hi all

I guess my question is to get gnuradio up and running do I need to build
it

from scratch using grc or is there a quicker(interpret easier) way of doing
it?

Thanks

Steve

Hi Steve,

Adidionaly to what M.All said I have to say it depends strongly what you
want to do wiht
gnuradio and what knowledge do you have about signalprocessing. For
example
if you
have only very low knowledge in signalprocessing like me but want to
build a
complete
sorfware defined shortwave reciever where the software and hardware is
completily opensource and want to mafufacture and sell the ready for use
shortwave recierver in the
final end, then you don’t need to build gnuradio, getting the source
should
be enough for
the first you can use the source code for study signalprocessing
algorithms
and for learning
C/C++, phyton, opensource developemt and much more…
On the gnuradio website are a lot of information where someone can start
reading a lot suggestions are even open.

Have fun exploring gnuradio :slight_smile:

best regards
Josef V.

PS: grc (gnuradio companion) is not a buildtool for building gnuradio,
it is
more like a buildtool
for building gnuradio applications in a graphical manner, somewhat
similar
like TI Labview

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