$ancient_browser - always 1?

as per subject, I’m playing around with the http browser module right
now,
and I just can’t seem to get it to work.

http://wiki.nginx.org/HttpBrowserModule itself seems confused as well.
In
the first part (“Selection of the index file”), it uses the format
‘modern_browser msie 5.5’ - while in Examples, this format is pointed
out as
broken.

Either way - I’m expecting for the value of $ancient_browser to only be
set
when nginx actually detects an ancient browser as set up by the
‘ancient_browser …’ lines. However, it seems that even without
specifying
any ancient_browser lines, the $ancient_browser value is set?

to show a snippet of my nginx.conf:

location / {
if ($ancient_browser) {
redirect .* /${ancient_browser}.html redirect;
}
proxy_pass http://127.0.0.1:1000;
}

This triggers the redirect no matter what - FF3, MSIE 7, MSIE 8, …

Am i doing anything wrong here? I’m using nginx 0.8.54, compiled from
nginx.org (and I havent disabled the http browser module)

thanks,
-jf


“Every nonfree program has a lord, a master –
and if you use the program, he is your master.”
–Richard Stallman

“It’s so hard to write a graphics driver that open-sourcing it would not
help.”
– Andrew Fear, Software Product Manager, NVIDIA Corporation
http://kerneltrap.org/node/7228

ok, a quick update after having glanced through the source - you’ll need
to
set BOTH ‘modern_browser’, and ‘ancient_browser’ (otherwise, u’ll just
hit
into major frustration - like i did). The ‘modern_browser’ format is as
per
the examples, and the doc, while ‘ancient_browser’ has to follow the
format
as given in ‘Examples’.

-jf


“Every nonfree program has a lord, a master –
and if you use the program, he is your master.”
–Richard Stallman

“It’s so hard to write a graphics driver that open-sourcing it would not
help.”
– Andrew Fear, Software Product Manager, NVIDIA Corporation
http://kerneltrap.org/node/7228

a little bit more detail. This supercedes what I said about having to
set
both ‘modern_browser’, and ‘ancient_browser’. But

  • modern_browsers are matched for the browser first, and then the
    version
    number. UA number >= ‘modern_browser’ version number = modern browser.
    Otherwise, it’s an ancient browser.

  • ‘ancient_browser’ values are literal strings that you must match for
    in
    the user-agent

  • if you have ‘modern_browser unlisted’, any browser that isnt caught by
    any
    other ‘modern_browser’ directive, or matched by any ‘ancient_browser’
    values
    is automatically a “modern browser”.

  • if you DONT have ‘modern_browser’, whatever falls through the cracks
    will
    automatically be declared an “ancient browser” (this was what tripped me
    up
    originally)

-jf


“Every nonfree program has a lord, a master –
and if you use the program, he is your master.”
–Richard Stallman

“It’s so hard to write a graphics driver that open-sourcing it would not
help.”
– Andrew Fear, Software Product Manager, NVIDIA Corporation
http://kerneltrap.org/node/7228

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