An Informal Contest


#1

Changeset 57 contains the following improvements:

  • Updated db/setup.rb. Option parsing has been improved and you can
    now
    select a template for your new Radiant database.
  • Added an export controller to make it easier to create templates. It
    exports your database in YAML format. Simply hit /admin/export/.

http://dev.radiantcms.org/radiant/changeset/57

If you examine the db/templates directory now you will see a couple of
simple YAML templates which can be used to generate the initial database
for a Radiant install. I’ve included three default templates:

  1. An empty template (to create a blank database)
  2. A bare bones template (the same as what you have seen before)
  3. A styled blog template

I just finished coding option #3 today. It demonstrates a lot of the
advanced features of Radiant and also looks nice.

I would love to see more options for people just getting started with
Radiant. If you are a talented designer and I’d like to invite you to
participate in an informal contest of sorts. I’m looking for two basic
templates:

  • A blog template
  • A simple company web site template

Here’s the catch: you can’t use images in the design at all. (Since
Radiant doesn’t have the attachments system yet it wouldn’t make sense
to put a lot of additional images in the public/images directory.)

If you submit a template that I like it will have a shot at being
included in the core distribution.

The easiest way to create a template is to setup a Radiant database the
way you like it and then go to /admin/export/ to get the YAML for it.
Then take the YAML and paste it into a template file in the db/templates
directory. You will need to modify the generated YAML a bit, but it
should be enough to get you started.


John L.
http://wiseheartdesign.com


#2

The easiest way to create a template is to setup a Radiant database the
way you like it and then go to /admin/export/ to get the YAML for it.
Then take the YAML and paste it into a template file in the db/templates
directory. You will need to modify the generated YAML a bit, but it
should be enough to get you started.

I’ve just finished a template, and now I am having one hell of a [not]
good time trying to get the it to work. I was wondering, why not just
use sql dumps for templates?


#3

Scratch that question, and answered it for myself.


#4

John W. Long wrote:

Bernard Yu wrote:

Scratch that question, and answered it for myself.

What was the answer? :slight_smile:


John L.
http://wiseheartdesign.com

It’d be trouble for anyone trying to use a non-SQL database. Though I
suppose that wouldn’t really happen that often.

But for the .yml files, I’m having a hell of a time trying to get the
thing to work properly and I haven’t the foggiest clue why. As it is,
I’m finishing with fixing some problems I didn’t notice with the CSS
print file, and I’m not looking foward to going through and making it
pretty again. it keeps coming up with yaml.rb errors every other line.


#5

If you make it work, it would be nice if you can post your experience, I
haven’t been trying lately but I couldn’t get a template to work
neither.


#6

Bernard Yu wrote:

Scratch that question, and answered it for myself.

What was the answer? :slight_smile:


John L.
http://wiseheartdesign.com


#7

Well then, I’d like to submit a (company) website template of sorts for
the contest…
I present Handsome in
Blue
.
It’s not just a blank template, it’s a lesson of sorts as well for those
new to Radiant as well as managing websites. The template
is a heavy weighing in at 41k, but it has separate stylesheets for
screen, print, and handheld devices, (also has some goodies for text
browsers). It uses XHTML-Strict, the CSS validates beautifully, and
takes advantage of a lot of Radius’s features.


Excuse me while I sob like a little baby I figured it out…the hard
way. I got to thinking, this is Ruby…therefore spaces matter. With
that in mind, I’ll outline the structure of the yaml file.

name: [name of template]
description: [description for template]
records:
Layouts:
1:
name: [name of layout]
id: 1
content: |
This is where the body of your template goes the
white space must be at least one space beyond
the beginning of its container, and remember
no indents that’s cheating.
2:
name: [name of second layout]
id: 2
Content: |
Snippets:
1:
name: [you get the point]
id: 1
content: |

Pages:
1:
slug:
title:
breadcrumb:
id:
status_id:
layout_id: [id of layout that should apply to it]
parent_id: [id of parent]
PageParts:
1:
name:
page_id: [id of page this part applies to]
id: 1
content: |
I hate myself, a lot

You basically have to give the same level container the same ammount of
white-space (so “layouts,” “Snippets,” “Pages,” and “PageParts” all have
2spaces, the ID numbers all have 4 spaces, etc). Hopefully I explained
that well enough…once you figure it out, it’s really easy. Good luck!