About choosing Ruby?

I want to learn a programming langauge and I am stuck between Python and
Ruby. I want to know, where is Ruby used except Web development and jobs
in Ruby, etc. What are the benefits of choosing Ruby over Python. I see
“Learn Python the Hard way” & “Learn Ruby the Hard way” side by side,
and the two languages are alomst silimar. Please forgive me for my
English and if i asked the wrong question or in wrong forum. Thank You.

The languages are quite similar. You really should just use the one
that seems nicer to you :slight_smile:

Here’s a comparison:
http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/documentation/ruby-from-other-languages/to-ruby-from-python/

I’d add to it:

  • Python is slightly less flexible, but slightly faster
  • Python usually uses list comprehensions (google it) instead of
    higher-order functions like select or map (google these, too)

– Matma R.

Ok. But please can you tell me Where Ruby is mostly used after web
development? And how many Jobs are there in Ruby (including Rails).

Ok. But please can you tell me Where Ruby is mostly used after web
development? And how many Jobs are there in Ruby (including Rails).

I use Ruby as my general scripting language. When I need to do something
(parse
data, fix directory full of files, etc.) I pick up Ruby and have it do
all the
heavy lifting for me. As far as Jobs go, that’s pretty wide open. I’d
say look
online and see what you can find. I can tell you that most of the people
who I
met doing Ruby development were working on some pretty cool things
(mostly for
the web) and for smaller companies. But I don’t think that jobs would be
limited
to that. I work for a fairly large company and we have people writing
scripts in
Java, Ruby, Python, and Perl. Just depends on what they learned and what
the
project is they are working on.

Wayne

On 9/11/2012 10:37 PM, Mr. Bean wrote:

Ok. But please can you tell me Where Ruby is mostly used after web
development? And how many Jobs are there in Ruby (including Rails).

It depends only on YOU actually.
I used it for some networking projects and general system scripts and
CGI scripts.
I must admit that with some lower level stuff you will need to learn
more then this or other language.

I like ruby for the ease of understanding of the language and most of
the API structure in it.
I did some scripting fixing in perl and python but ruby had the most
understandable\self explanatory language I have ever used.

most of the jobs I have seen in system(my area) is not a “ruby” job but
more of Do whatever tools you have in the system job.

Regards,
Eliezer

Mr. Bean wrote in post #1075521:

Ok. But please can you tell me Where Ruby is mostly used after web
development? And how many Jobs are there in Ruby (including Rails).

Remember that it is not just about how many jobs are out there. It is
also how many people there are to fill them. If there are a million
jobs and 2 million people that want them, it is not as good as half a
million jobs and 100k people to fill them.

There are not as many ruby jobs as there are for java, for example.
Still, there are fewer people standing in line for them, so the odds of
getting a good one are higher in this completely contrived example. :slight_smile:

Bartosz Dziewoński wrote in post #1075516:

The languages are quite similar. You really should just use the one
that seems nicer to you :slight_smile:

Here’s a comparison:

http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/documentation/ruby-from-other-languages/to-ruby-from-python/

I’d add to it:

  • Python is slightly less flexible, but slightly faster
  • Python usually uses list comprehensions (google it) instead of
    higher-order functions like select or map (google these, too)

And I’d add:

  • Ruby has a much clearer class model, and cleaner separation of methods
    and instance variables
  • Python(3) has a much more sane approach to strings and encoded
    representations of strings than ruby(1.9)

However if you really have to ask the question “which one should I learn
to get a job?”, then you’re not really starting at the right point IMO.

To make yourself attractive to an employer, you should get experience
writing real projects in multiple languages. In this process you’ll not
only find out what you enjoy, but you will fill in a lot of gaps in your
knowledge by looking at problems from different angles.

You will have a clearer idea what sort of job you are looking for, and
your prospective employer can be impressed both that you enjoy working
in a particular language, and that you can explain the differences
between this one and others you have worked with.

Regards,

Brian

You have to choose what you like better. It doesn’t really matter which
language. Think about experience you get :slight_smile:

Take care,
wizard

Perhaps an analogous question would be: “Do you think I should become an
Anglican or a Catholic in order to get a good job as a priest?”

Being an excellent programmer is more of a vocation than you might
think.

If you don’t think you have what it takes, but just want to make a
living, then I suggest you learn Java. There are plenty of humdrum jobs
out there churning out code for moving business objects around. After a
while, you can start earnestly discussing “design patterns” with your
colleagues.

Regards,

Brian.

“I see “Learn Python the Hard way” & “Learn Ruby the Hard way” side by
side,
and the two languages are alomst silimar.”

Unless I am mistaken, the author of those sites hates Ruby.

He rage-quitted before. It is sad that he is a drama queen and STILL
writes ruby without really USING it.

As for your question, you must decide on your own.

I can tell you that I had to make the same decision 7 years ago.

I picked ruby because of these reasons:

  • matz. He convinced me with an interview from ~back then. matz = very
    clever person

  • Philosophy. Ruby is like beautiful poetry. I have not seen this before
    in a programming language. Sure, you can write ugly code, but you can
    also write very beautiful code. I look at my code and when I understand
    it without having to THINK about it, then I know it is “right”.

If I have to think about it, it is wrong (this is a reason why I avoid
“meta-programming”. Meta-programming leads me to HAVE to think, which is
BAD. I don’t want to think at all, code should work in such a way as I
NEVER have to think about it after it is written and “fits in”.)

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